2014 Power Broker: Under 40

Young Talent Pushing Forward

Many insurance professionals say they “fell into” the industry. Our Power Broker® winners and finalists under age 40 are no different, crediting their introduction to the business largely to family members who got them an “in.” Their experiences entering and working their way up through the ranks demonstrate both the strengths and weaknesses of the industry, and paint a picture of what the future may hold.

2014 Under-40 rankings sponsored by:

The Institues

Denton Christner, 36, a Power Broker® in the Gaming and Hospitality category, started working as a file clerk in his father’s Allstate agency as a high school student. He stayed with Allstate through college and eventually became an agent at the age of 21.

After agency consolidation left him and other brokers with smaller books looking for other options, he took a tip from another family member and went the independent route, joining BayRisk Insurance Brokers at 24.

Eleven years later, Christner is vice president and has helped BayRisk build its biggest new business source: a program for food truck insurance. Taking advantage of social media and online marketing, he has used the Internet as a primary sales driver, bringing InsureMyFoodTruck.com to the top of search engine results lists.

“Trying to sell commercial insurance to business owners who are oftentimes 10, 20 or 30 years my senior was very difficult. That was a big obstacle as a young agent, trying to prove my professionalism.”
— Denton Christner, vice president, Bay Risk Insurance Brokers

“It was an amazing experience; totally life-changing,” Christner said. “I pretty much ate, slept and breathed food trucks for 18 months getting it launched.”

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Lindsay Roos, 30, and a Power Broker® in the Pharmaceutical category, secured an internship with Marsh as a college junior with the help of a family member. In fact, internships and early training programs are a common thread among our young success stories.

“I interned in our Morristown, N.J., office for two years,” said Roos, a vice president and excess casualty placement broker at Bowring Marsh. “It was my first real work experience, and I really liked the work and the company. Most importantly, I really liked the people.” Marsh hired Roos into a graduate training program that gave her a well-rounded and formalized immersion in the industry alongside her peers.

Kate Simons, a 28-year-old Power Broker® finalist in the Retail category, took a summer internship with Aon as a college student “without really knowing what it was at first.” But the program drew her in, opening up the world of learning opportunities that the insurance industry has to offer.

“In this job, the thing I like is that you ultimately get to learn about all the industries your clients are in, whether it’s retail, real estate, manufacturing, food, and the list goes on and on,” she said.

Like Roos, Simons participated in an early career development program at the company. The 18-month training helped her home in on what aspects of insurance most appealed to her and exposed her to key mentors, leading her to her current position as senior broker.

“I also felt that the industry had a really good focus on developing young talent and investing in the future,” Simons said.

Attracting Graduates

Indeed, internships and intensive training programs continue to be key tools in bringing new grads into the fold.

Big brokers like Aon, Marsh and Beecher Carlson reach out to colleges to find prospective talent and introduce them to the industry. If all goes according to plan, those interns become full-time hires.

A year or two of initial training for new employees gets their feet wet in every aspect of the business. Those onboarding programs help young brokers find what niche appeals to them, and in what function they can excel.

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For many, that process helps young professionals move on from simply “falling into” insurance to really embracing it as a rewarding and exciting career.

As evidence of these programs’ successes, notice that this year’s “Under 40” class of winners and finalists includes 60 brokers, as opposed to last year’s 40. More young brokers are thriving in the business.

“The best experience comes from clinging onto some good people who are willing to teach you.”

— Lindsay Roos, vice president, Bowring Marsh

Yet, for an industry that invests considerable time and resources in developing new talent, the concern remains that not enough young people realize the benefits of working in insurance. In spite of a wealth of opportunity, the influx of new grads remains troublingly low.

“There are not enough young people getting into insurance, unfortunately,” Christner said. “It takes a lot of convincing and hand-holding and mentorship to get new producers settled into their career.”

Roos echoed that thought, noting that most college students aren’t necessarily looking for a professional career in insurance, but end up there via a tangential skill or interest.

That’s how a career in insurance brokering developed for Blythe O’Brien Hogan, a director in the Global Fine Arts Practice at Aon. O’Brien Hogan majored in art history as an undergraduate, then pursued a master’s degree in art business at Sotheby’s Institute of Art in London. That got her interested in art protection, both for personal collections as well as in transit or on display in a gallery or museum. She eventually wrote her master’s thesis on the development of insurance and risk management for fine art.

“From there I segued into the very dynamic, but a little bit niche, risk management insurance industry for fine art collections,” she said.

Aon’s Global Fine Arts Practice, launched in 2005, allowed O’Brien Hogan, a Power Broker® in the Fine Arts category, to work more closely with all players in the art industry, from handlers, shippers, storage facilities, and conservators to appraisers and tax attorneys.

Growing Pains

Despite being given opportunities and responsibilities early in their careers, many young brokers have had to overcome ageism in order to move ahead.

“Trying to sell commercial insurance to business owners who are oftentimes 10, 20 or 30 years my senior was very difficult,” Christner said. “That was a big obstacle as a young agent, trying to prove my professionalism.”

“It is challenging at times to get people to look past your age,” Simons said. “Being younger and still successful; sometimes, people tend to look for a little gray hair.”

Ultimately, though, a sound working knowledge of clients’ industries wins out, gaining their trust and building a positive reputation.

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Seth Cohen, 30, and an Entertainment Power Broker®, worked around the challenges of youth and inexperience by focusing on educational opportunities and industry training.

“I realized I could really accelerate my experience beyond my years,” said Cohen, an entertainment area vice president with Arthur J. Gallagher. “I got my ARM and CPCU as quickly as I could. I took a UCLA filmmaking and production course that was very intensive. I continue to attend media law conferences. Staying on top of current affairs helps to stay ahead of your inexperience.”

A little persistence never hurt either.

“Hard work and perseverance, being creative and asking questions has been the way to work through all that,” Simons said.

Younger brokers also have the advantage of greater familiarity with changing technologies, which shape industry best practices in a number of ways. Social media and online marketing are becoming increasingly common and important ways to reach clients, as Christner proved with the success of his food truck program. Sophisticated data analysis and modeling are now equally invaluable items in the broker’s toolbox.

“The younger generation probably embraces it more and adapts better,” Simons said. “They have more innovative thoughts as far as asking, ‘What else can I do with this technology and data to look at things a different way?’ ”

Tips for Success

So what can entry-level brokers learn from our Under 40 winners and finalists? First and foremost: Pounce on every new venture.

“I would say take advantage of every single opportunity, meaning every chance to be involved with other professionals [in the industry],” O’Brien Hogan said.

Simons echoed that advice. “Jump on every opportunity, and there are many in the industry, but you have to make the most of them,” she said. “Work hard. Be confident.”

And that uncle, sister or cousin with experience in the field? Tap into their knowledge base, and pick mentors’ brains as often as possible.

“The best experience comes from clinging onto some good people who are willing to teach you,” Roos said.

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Finally, the best brokers — no matter what their age — always have an in-depth knowledge of their customers’ industries. Specializing in areas of interest helps develop expertise that clients covet.

“Knowing the industry is key,” O’Brien Hogan said. “From all different angles — not just insurance, but all the little components that go into risk management.”

While challenges remain for the industry’s stability and growth potential, the growing number of Under 40 Power Broker® winners and finalists offers hope that the industry will remain dynamic for the future.

Listing of Power Broker Winners and Finalists Under 40:

Sarah Allison Senior Vice President Marsh, New York

Sarah Allison
Senior Vice President
Marsh, New York

James Bernstein, 34 Mercer, Cincinnati Employee Benefits

James Bernstein, 34
Mercer, Cincinnati
Employee Benefits

Morgan Anderson, 36 Arthur J. Gallagher, Irvine, Calif. Real Estate

Morgan Anderson, 36 Gallagher, Irvine, Calif.
Real Estate

Charles Blackmon, 34 Krauter & Co., Chicago Private Equity

Charles Blackmon, 34
Krauter & Co., Chicago
Private Equity

Joseph Braunstein, 37 Marsh, New York Aviation

Joseph Braunstein, 37
Marsh, New York
Aviation

Denton Christner, 35 BayRisk Insurance Brokers, Inc., Alameda, Calif. Gaming/Hospitality

Denton Christner, 35
BayRisk, Calif.
Gaming/Hospitality

Krista Cinotti, 35 Willis, New York Financial Services - Banking

Krista Cinotti, 35
Willis, New York
Financial Services

Seth Cohen, 30 Arthur J. Gallagher, Glendale, Calif. Entertainment

Seth Cohen, 30
Gallagher, California
Entertainment

Anne Corona, 36 Aon, Los Angeles Gaming/ Hospitality

Anne Corona, 36
Aon, Los Angeles
Gaming/ Hospitality

Bryan Eure, 34 Willis, New York Real Estate

Bryan Eure, 34
Willis, New York
Real Estate

Lindy Connery, 29 Marsh, New York Technology

Lindy Connery, 29
Marsh, New York
Technology

Ariel Duris, 38 Aon, Denver Aviation, Financial Services - Banking

Ariel Duris, 38
Aon, Denver
Financial Services

Larissa Gallagher, 26 Aon, Southfield, Mich. Chemicals & Refining

Larissa Gallagher, 26
Aon, Southfield, Mich.
Chemicals & Refining

Elisa Black, 28 Aon, Chicago Automotive

Elisa Black, 28
Aon, Chicago
Automotive

David Garrett, 37 John L. Wortham & Son, Houston Private Equity

David Garrett, 37
Wortham Ins., Houston
Private Equity

Jim Gillette, 34 EPIC, Los Angeles Retailing/ Wholesaling

Jim Gillette, 34
EPIC, Los Angeles
Retail

Mike Gingrich, 38 Neace Lukens, Dayton, Ohio Workers' Comp

Mike Gingrich, 38
Neace Lukens, Ohio
Workers’ Comp

Angela Giunto, 37 Aon, Denver Gaming/ Hospitality

Angela Giunto, 37
Aon, Denver
Gaming/ Hospitality

Meaghan Haney, 27 Aon, Washington Education

Meaghan Haney, 27
Aon, Washington
Education

Chris Heinicke, 38 Aon, Hamilton, Bermuda Automotive

Chris Heinicke, 38
Aon, Bermuda
Automotive

Matthew Heinz, 37 Aon, New York Private Equity

Matthew Heinz, 37
Aon, New York
Private Equity

Drew Johnston, 38 Aon, Wichita, Kan, Aviation

Drew Johnston, 38
Aon, Wichita, Kan,
Aviation

Jared McElroy, 33 Aon, Cincinnati Chemicals & Refining

Jared McElroy, 33
Aon, Cincinnati
Chemicals & Refining

Brian Lu, 32 Aon, New York Environmental

Brian Lu, 32
Aon, New York
Environmental

Matt Mautz, 33 Beecher Carlson, Atlanta Workers' Comp

Matt Mautz, 33
Beecher Carlson, 
Workers’ Comp

Tyler LaMantia, 27 Arthur J. Gallagher, Itasca, Ill. Public Sector

Tyler LaMantia, 27
Gallagher, Itasca, Ill.
Public Sector

Lorrie McNaught, 39 Aon/ Albert G. Ruben, Sherman Oaks, Calif. Entertainment

Lorrie McNaught, 39
Aon, California
Entertainment

Keith Montone, 31 Willis, Radnor, Pa. Environmental

Keith Montone, 31
Willis, Radnor, Pa.
Environmental

Anthony Moraes, 36 Integro Insurance Brokers, San Francisco Technology

Anthony Moraes, 36
Integro, San Francisco
Technology

Sean Murphy, 34 Arthur J. Gallagher, Houston Gaming/ Hospitality

Sean Murphy, 34
Gallagher, Houston
Gaming/ Hospitality

Lee Newmark, 26 Arthur J. Gallagher, Itasca, Ill. Health Care

Lee Newmark, 26
Gallagher, Itasca, Ill.
Health Care

Tandis M. H. Nili, 33 Aon, New York Real Estate

Tandis M. H. Nili, 33
Aon, New York
Real Estate

Blythe O'Brien, 29 Aon, New York Real Estate

Blythe O’Brien, 29
Aon, New York
Real Estate

Dennis O'Neill Jr., 33 Aon, Philadelphia Retailing/ Wholesaling

Dennis O’Neill Jr., 33
Aon, Philadelphia
Retail

Michael O'Neill, 35 Aon, New York Pharmaceuticals

Michael O’Neill, 35
Aon, New York
Pharmaceuticals

Stefanie Pearl, 33 Marsh, New York Financial Services - Banking

Stefanie Pearl, 33
Marsh, New York
Financial Services

Adrian Pellen, 30 Aon, New York Environmental

Adrian Pellen, 30
Aon, New York
Environmental

Mary Pontillo, 37 DeWitt Stern, New York Fine Arts

Mary Pontillo, 37
DeWitt Stern, New York
Fine Arts

Samuel Pugatch, 31 DeWitt Stern, New York Fine Arts

Samuel Pugatch, 31
DeWitt Stern, New York
Fine Arts

Brendan Quinlan, 34 Arthur J. Gallagher, San Francisco Utilities

Brendan Quinlan, 34
Gallagher, Calif.
Utilities

Chris Rafferty, 34 Aon, Chicago Automotive

Chris Rafferty, 34
Aon, Chicago
Automotive

Lindsay Roos, 30 Marsh, Hamilton, Bermuda Pharmaceuticals

Lindsay Roos, 30
Marsh, Bermuda
Pharmaceuticals

Duncan Ross, 35 Marsh, London Energy - Traditional

Duncan Ross, 35
Marsh, London
Energy – Traditional

James Sallada, 34 Marsh, New York Retailing/ Wholesaling

James Sallada, 34
Marsh, New York
Retail

Scott Schachter, 39 Marsh, New York Entertainment

Scott Schachter, 39
Marsh, New York
Entertainment

Aaron Simpson, 37 Aon, Philadelphia Pharmaceuticals

Aaron Simpson, 37
Aon, Philadelphia
Pharmaceuticals

Sharon Sotelo-Lee, 39 Integro Insurance Brokers, San Francisco Technology

Sharon Sotelo-Lee, 39
Integro, San Francisco
Technology

Stephen Stoicovy, 27 Aon, Houston Chemicals & Refining

Stephen Stoicovy, 27
Aon, Houston
Chemicals & Refining

Marc Toy, 38 Beecher Carlson, San Francisco Energy - Alternative

Marc Toy, 38
Beecher Carlson, Calif.
Energy – Alternative

Andy Vetor, 34 MJ Insurance, Indianapolis Employee Benefits

Andy Vetor, 34
MJ Insurance, Ind.
Employee Benefits

Gina Visor, 35 Marsh, Charlotte, N.C. Utilities

Gina Visor, 35
Marsh, Charlotte, N.C.
Utilities

Michael White, 37 Beecher Carlson, Atlanta Construction

Michael White, 37
Beecher Carlson, 
Construction

Ross Wheeler, 37 Aon, Chicago Retailing/ Wholesaling

Ross Wheeler, 37
Aon, Chicago
Retail

Alexander Zavala, 33 Willis, New York Real Estate

Alexander Zavala, 33
Willis, New York
Real Estate

Clayton Corbett, 29 Aon, Houston Energy - Alternative

Clayton Corbett, 29
Aon, Houston
Energy – Alternative

Neil Cayabyab, 34 Marsh, Irvine, Calif. Utilities

Neil Cayabyab, 34
Marsh, Irvine, Calif.
Utilities

Brandon Cole, 29 Arthur J. Gallagher, Greenwood Village, Colo. Nonprofit

Brandon Cole, 29
Gallagher, Colo.
Nonprofit

Helena Lai, 34 Aon - Huntington T. Block Insurance Agency, Washington Fine Arts

Helena Lai, 34
Aon, Washington DC
Fine Arts

Adam Rekerdres, 35 Rekerdres & Sons Insurance Agency, Dallas Marine

Adam Rekerdres, 35
Rekerdres & Sons, Dallas
Marine

Kate Simons, 28 Aon, Chicago Retailing/ Wholesaling

Kate Simons, 28
Aon, Chicago
Retail

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2016 Power Broker

Power Broker Rising Stars

The class of 2016 impresses with its size and quality.
By: and | March 1, 2016 • 3 min read

Judging the talent employed by commercial insurance brokers leads us to one conclusion; optimism is the order of the day.

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As we discovered this year, not only are the ranks of high-achieving younger brokers as strong as ever, they are increasing in number.

We’ve renamed our Power Broker® “Under 40” category to “Rising Stars” to better celebrate this wave of talent and to focus on an important point. Yes, this is a younger group of professionals, all of them under 40, but it’s more on point to think of them as the future leaders of this profession.

As Power Broker® winners and finalists, this set of Rising Stars demonstrated a superior level of creativity in finding solutions for their clients, unflagging customer service and a devotion to learning more about their industry.

Just four years ago, the number of brokers honored by this designation hovered around 40. Last, year, there were 54 Power Broker® winners and finalists recognized in the Under 40 category.

Over the next few pages, you will see the names and affiliations of 77 brokers we recognize as Rising Stars. Since the launch of this category in 2009, more than 250 brokers under 40 received the designation.

The average age of the Rising Stars designees is 36. They represent a powerful wave of talent that is bolstering a profession, which like many other professions will be challenged to replace talent as the baby boomers retire.

For this group of Rising Stars, a career in commercial insurance brokerage is a compelling challenge that results in rich rewards.

“I really enjoy telling ‘the story’ on behalf of my client to the insurance carrier, to pique their interest in an account,” — Ashley De Paola, assistant vice president, Alliant

We first came to know Lockton’s Christopher Keith when he broke into the Power Broker® ranks as a winner in the Workers’ Compensation category in February 2013.

In those days, Keith worked for the Philadelphia-based Graham Co. Keith, 39, said it’s the “entrepreneurial” nature of the business that he finds so rewarding.

“I like the fact that I am managing my own profit and loss statement,” said Keith, who this year achieved Power Broker® status in the Aviation category.

Ashley De Paola, assistant vice president, Alliant

Ashley De Paola, assistant vice president, Alliant

At Lockton’s annual President’s Dinner, he was recognized as the “prototype” Lockton producer.

“I’m very proud of that,” he said.

Alliant’s Ashley De Paola, 33, a 2016 Power Broker® in the Real Estate category, said it’s the quick-paced, evolving atmosphere of commercial insurance brokerage that excites her.

“I really enjoy telling ‘the story’ on behalf of my client to the insurance carrier, to pique their interest in an account,” De Paola said.

Earlier in her career, a client expressed his concern over her age and experience. Her review of his insurance program changed his mind.

“It was very rewarding when he later asked me to work on his business,” she said.

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Beecher Carlson’s Joe Roberta, a 2016 Power Broker® winner in the Private Equity category, has several reasons he likes working in this industry. Top of the list is that this is a very “social industry.”

“I truly enjoy working with people that I’ve been fortunate enough to build long-term relationships with,” he said.

Justin Wiley, 32, Power Broker® winner in the Public Sector category, works for Arthur J. Gallagher & Co., which prides itself on its mentoring efforts.

The company sent Wiley to Orlando, Fla., to work with veteran Rich Terlecki, himself a multiple Power Broker® winner.

“My goal was to learn and gather from him as much intellectual capital as possible,” Wiley said.

Clearly, Terlecki taught him well.

The 2016 Power Broker® Rising Stars

Morgan Anderson, 38 Arthur J. Gallagher Irvine, Calif. Real Estate

Morgan Anderson, 38
Arthur J. Gallagher
Irvine, Calif.
Real Estate

Peter Ballas, 33 Aon Morristown, N.J. At-large

Peter Ballas, 33
Aon
Morristown, N.J.
At-large

Brooke Barnett, 37 Marsh Los Angeles Entertainment

Brooke Barnett, 37
Marsh
Los Angeles
Entertainment

Herman Brito Jr., 26 Marsh New York Marine

Herman Brito Jr., 26
Marsh
New York
Marine

John Byers, 34 Aon Franklin, Tenn. Employee Benefits

John Byers, 34
Aon
Franklin, Tenn.
Employee Benefits

Sandy Carter, 32 Beecher Carlson Atlanta Automotive

Sandy Carter, 32
Beecher Carlson
Atlanta
Automotive

Brandon Cole, 31 Arthur J. Gallagher Irvine, Calif. Nonprofit

Brandon Cole, 31
Arthur J. Gallagher
Irvine, Calif.
Nonprofit

Edward Conlon, 37 Aon New York Financial Institutions

Edward Conlon, 37
Aon
New York
Financial Institutions

Chris Connelly, 32 Arthur J. Gallagher Orlando, Fla. Public Sector

Chris Connelly, 32
Arthur J. Gallagher
Orlando, Fla.
Public Sector

Anne Corona, 38 Aon San Francisco Technology

Anne Corona, 38
Aon
San Francisco
Technology

Cara Cortes, 35 Aon Pittsburgh At-large

Cara Cortes, 35
Aon
Pittsburgh
At-large

Uri Dallal, 37 Aon New York Financial Institutions

Uri Dallal, 37
Aon
New York
Financial Institutions

Ashley De Paola, 33 Alliant New York Real Estate

Ashley De Paola, 33
Alliant
New York
Real Estate

Brian Dougal, 38 Aon San Francisco Real Estate

Brian Dougal, 38
Aon
San Francisco
Real Estate

Justin Dove, 29 Arthur J. Gallagher San Francisco Real Estate

Justin Dove, 29
Arthur J. Gallagher
San Francisco
Real Estate

Patrick Drake, 27 Aon Southfield, Mich. Utilities, Alternative

Patrick Drake, 27
Aon
Southfield, Mich.
Utilities, Alternative

Dan Edelstein, 37 Willis Towers Watson New York Manufacturing

Dan Edelstein, 37
Willis Towers Watson
New York
Manufacturing

Tim Farward, 36 Marsh Philadelphia Utilities, traditional

Tim Farward, 36
Marsh
Philadelphia
Utilities, traditional

Larissa Gallagher, 28 Aon Southfield, Mich. Manufacturing

Larissa Gallagher, 28
Aon
Southfield, Mich.
Manufacturing

Dominic Gallina, 39 Aon New York Real Estate

Dominic Gallina, 39
Aon
New York
Real Estate

Kevin Garvey, 37 Aon Cleveland Automotive

Kevin Garvey, 37
Aon
Cleveland
Automotive

Matthew Giambagno, 26 Marsh, New York Energy/Downstream

Matthew Giambagno, 26
Marsh, New York
Energy/Downstream

Blake Giannisis, 36 Aon New York Real Estate

Blake Giannisis, 36
Aon
New York
Real Estate

George Gionis, 33 Aon Philadelphia At-large

George Gionis, 33
Aon
Philadelphia
At-large

Debbie Goldstine, 39 Lockton Chicago Manufacturing

Debbie Goldstine, 39
Lockton
Chicago
Manufacturing

Sarah Goodman, 36 Marsh New York Pharma/Life Sciences

Sarah Goodman, 36
Marsh
New York
Pharma/Life Sciences

Jessica Govic, 30 Arthur J. Gallagher Itasca, Ill. Public Sector

Jessica Govic, 30
Arthur J. Gallagher
Itasca, Ill.
Public Sector

Robert Hale, 39 Aon London Utilities, traditional

Robert Hale, 39
Aon
London
Utilities, traditional

Joshua Halpern, 34 Aon New York Private Equity

Joshua Halpern, 34
Aon
New York
Private Equity

Matthew Heinz, 39 Aon New York Private Equity

Matthew Heinz, 39
Aon
New York
Private Equity

Charlie Herr, 25 Arthur J. Gallagher Kansas City, Mo. Education

Charlie Herr, 25
Arthur J. Gallagher
Kansas City, Mo.
Education

Blythe Hogan, 31 Aon New York Fine Arts

Blythe Hogan, 31
Aon
New York
Fine Arts

James Jackson, 35 Willis Towers Watson New York Financial Institutions

James Jackson, 35
Willis Towers Watson
New York
Financial Institutions

Sarah Johnson Court, 35 Aon, Miami Fine Arts

Sarah Johnson Court, 35
Aon, Miami
Fine Arts

Christopher Keith, 39 Lockton Blue Bell, Pa. Aviation & Aerospace

Christopher Keith, 39
Lockton
Blue Bell, Pa.
Aviation & Aerospace

Charlie King, 36 Alliant Houston Energy/Upstream

Charlie King, 36
Alliant
Houston
Energy/Upstream

Jonathan Kosin, 37 Aon Southfield, Mich. Construction

Jonathan Kosin, 37
Aon
Southfield, Mich.
Construction

Tyler LaMantia, 29 Arthur J. Gallagher Itasca, Ill. Education

Tyler LaMantia, 29
Arthur J. Gallagher
Itasca, Ill.
Education

Jeanna Madlener, 37 Wells Fargo Portland, Ore. At-large

Jeanna Madlener, 37
Wells Fargo
Portland, Ore.
At-large

 Kimberly Mann, 27 Marsh Philadelphia Environmental


Kimberly Mann, 27
Marsh
Philadelphia
Environmental

Kristina Marcigliano, 27 DeWitt Stern New York Fine Arts

Kristina Marcigliano, 27
DeWitt Stern
New York
Fine Arts

 Matt Medeiros, 34 Arthur J. Gallagher Media, Pa. Retail


Matt Medeiros, 34
Arthur J. Gallagher
Media, Pa.
Retail

Mary Mulhern, 33 Marsh Chicago Health Care

Mary Mulhern, 33
Marsh
Chicago
Health Care

Dennis Nevinski, 31 Aon Chicago Aviation & Aerospace

Dennis Nevinski, 31
Aon
Chicago
Aviation & Aerospace

Lee Newmark, 28 Arthur J. Gallagher Itasca, Ill. Health Care

Lee Newmark, 28
Arthur J. Gallagher
Itasca, Ill.
Health Care

Jake Onken, 26 Aon Houston Health Care

Jake Onken, 26
Aon
Houston
Health Care

Joanna Paredes, 28 Rekerdres & Sons Dallas Marine

Joanna Paredes, 28
Rekerdres & Sons
Dallas
Marine

Stephen Pasdiora, 27 Cottingham & Butler Rosemont, Ill. Employee Benefits

Stephen Pasdiora, 27
Cottingham & Butler
Rosemont, Ill.
Employee Benefits

Stefanie Pearl, 35 Marsh New York Financial Institutions

Stefanie Pearl, 35
Marsh
New York
Financial Institutions

Jason Peery, 37 Aon Newport Beach, Calif. Real Estate

Jason Peery, 37
Aon
Newport Beach, Calif.
Real Estate

Adrian Pellen, 32 Aon Chicago Construction

Adrian Pellen, 32
Aon
Chicago
Construction

Chris Rafferty, 36 Aon Chicago Manufacturing

Chris Rafferty, 36
Aon
Chicago
Manufacturing

Daniel R’bibo, 36 Arthur J. Gallagher Glendale, Calif. Entertainment

Daniel R’bibo, 36
Arthur J. Gallagher
Glendale, Calif.
Entertainment

Brent Rieth, 30 Aon San Francisco Technology

Brent Rieth, 30
Aon
San Francisco
Technology

 Joe Roberta, 35 Beecher Carlson New York Private Equity


Joe Roberta, 35
Beecher Carlson
New York
Private Equity

Robert Rosenzweig, 30 Risk Strategies New York Technology

Robert Rosenzweig, 30
Risk Strategies
New York
Technology

 Patrick Roth, 35 Aon Denver Pharma/Life Sciences


Patrick Roth, 35
Aon
Denver
Pharma/Life Sciences

 Laura Rubin, 33 Beecher Carlson Boston Utilities, Alternative


Laura Rubin, 33
Beecher Carlson
Boston
Utilities, Alternative

 Ian Schwartz,31 Aon Los Angeles Real Estate


Ian Schwartz,31
Aon
Los Angeles
Real Estate

Christopher Shorter, 36 Aon Houston Energy/Downstream

Christopher Shorter, 36
Aon
Houston
Energy/Downstream

Brian Simons, 34 Aon New York Financial Institutions

Brian Simons, 34
Aon
New York
Financial Institutions

Andrew Smith, 28 Marsh New York Marine

Andrew Smith, 28
Marsh
New York
Marine

Timothy Sullivan, 38 Willis Towers Watson Boston Financial Institutions

Timothy Sullivan, 38
Willis Towers Watson
Boston
Financial Institutions

Kurt Thoennessen, 37 Ericson Ins. Advisors Washington Depot, Conn. Private Client

Kurt Thoennessen, 37
Ericson Ins. Advisors
Washington Depot, Conn.
Private Client

 John Tomlinson, 37 Lockton Encino, Calif. Entertainment


John Tomlinson, 37
Lockton
Encino, Calif.
Entertainment

 Kaitlin Upchurch, 30 Wortham Houston At-large


Kaitlin Upchurch, 30
Wortham
Houston
At-large

 Liz Van Dervort, 30 Gillis, Ellis & Baker New Orleans Nonprofit


Liz Van Dervort, 30
Gillis, Ellis & Baker
New Orleans
Nonprofit

 Rene Van Winden, 36 Aon Houston Energy/Downstream


Rene Van Winden, 36
Aon
Houston
Energy/Downstream

Ben Von Obstfelder, 30 Aon Wauconda, Ill. Retail

Ben Von Obstfelder, 30
Aon
Wauconda, Ill.
Retail

Michael Walsh, 35 Marsh Boston Real Estate

Michael Walsh, 35
Marsh
Boston
Real Estate

Emily Weiss, 29 DeWitt Stern New York Fine Arts

Emily Weiss, 29
DeWitt Stern
New York
Fine Arts

Jeremiah White, 38 Aon Frederick, Md. Transportation

Jeremiah White, 38
Aon
Frederick, Md.
Transportation

 Joshua White, 28 Gulfshore Insurance Naples, Fla. Private Client


Joshua White, 28
Gulfshore Insurance
Naples, Fla.
Private Client

Casey Wigglesworth, 37 Aon Washington, DC Fine Arts

Casey Wigglesworth, 37
Aon
Washington, DC
Fine Arts

 Justin Wiley, 33 Arthur J. Gallagher Orlando, Fla. Public Sector


Justin Wiley, 33
Arthur J. Gallagher
Orlando, Fla.
Public Sector

Wendy Wu, 38 Aon Shanghai Automotive

Wendy Wu, 38
Aon
Shanghai
Automotive

Susan Young, 30 Marsh Seattle Retail

Susan Young, 30
Marsh
Seattle
Retail

Dan Reynolds is editor-in-chief of Risk & Insurance®. He can be reached at [email protected] Tom Starner, a freelance journalist, can be reached at [email protected]
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Commercial Auto Warning: Emerging Frequency and Severity Trends Threaten Policyholders

Commercial auto policyholders should consider utilizing a consultative approach and tools to better manage their transportation exposures.
By: | June 1, 2016 • 6 min read

The slow but steady climb out of the Great Recession means businesses can finally transition out of survival mode and set their sights on growth and expansion.

The construction, retail and energy sectors in particular are enjoying an influx of business — but getting back on their feet doesn’t come free of challenges.

Increasingly, expensive commercial auto losses hamper the upward trend. From 2012 to 2015, auto loss costs increased a cumulative 20 percent, according to the Insurance Services Office.

“Since the recession ended, commercial auto losses have challenged businesses trying to grow,” said David Blessing, SVP and Chief Underwriting Officer for National Insurance Casualty at Liberty Mutual Insurance. “As the economy improves and businesses expand, it means there are more vehicles on the road covering more miles. That is pushing up the frequency of auto accidents.”

For companies with transportation exposure, costly auto losses can hinder continued growth. Buyers who partner closely with their insurance brokers and carriers to understand these risks – and the consultative support and tools available to manage them – are better positioned to protect their employees, fleets, and businesses.

Liberty Mutual’s David Blessing discusses key challenges in the commercial auto market.

LM_SponsoredContent“Since the recession ended, commercial auto losses have challenged businesses trying to grow. As the economy improves and businesses expand, it means there are more vehicles on the road covering more miles. That is pushing up the frequency of auto accidents.”
–David Blessing, SVP and Chief Underwriting Officer for National Insurance Casualty, Liberty Mutual Insurance

More Accidents, More Dollars

Rising claims costs typically stem from either increased frequency or severity — but in the case of commercial auto, it’s both. This presents risk managers with the unique challenge of blunting a double-edged sword.

Cumulative miles driven in February, 2016, were up 5.6 percent compared to February, 2015, Blessing said. Unfortunately, inexperienced drivers are at the helm for a good portion of those miles.

A severe shortage of experienced commercial drivers — nearing 50,000 by the end of 2015, according to the American Trucking Association — means a limited pool to choose from. Drivers completing unfamiliar routes or lacking practice behind the wheel translate into more accidents, but companies facing intense competition for experienced drivers with good driving records may be tempted to let risk management best practices slip, like proper driver screening and training.

Distracted driving, whether it’s as a result of using a phone, eating, or reading directions, is another factor contributing to the number of accidents on the road. Recent findings from the National Safety Council indicate that as much as 27% of crashes involved drivers talking or texting on cell phones.

The factors driving increased frequency in the commercial auto market.

In addition to increased frequency, a variety of other factors are driving up claim severity, resulting in higher payments for both bodily injury and property damage.

Treating those injured in a commercial auto accident is more expensive than ever as medical costs rise at a faster rate than the overall Consumer Price Index.

“Medical inflation continues to go up by about three percent, whereas the core CPI is closer to two percent,” Blessing said.

Changing physical medicine fee schedules in some states also drive up commercial auto claim costs. California, for example, increased the cost of physical medicine by 38 percent over the past two years and will increase it by a total of 64 percent by the end of 2017.

And then there is the cost of repairing and replacing damaged vehicles.

“There are a lot of new vehicles on the road, and those cost more to repair and replace,” Blessing said. “In the last few years, heavy truck sales have increased at double digit rates — 15 percent in 2014, followed by an additional 11 percent in 2015.”

The impact is seen in the industry-wide combined ratio for commercial auto coverage, which per Conning, increased from 103 in 2014 to 105 for 2015, and is forecast to grow to nearly 110 by 2018.

None of these trends show signs of slowing or reversing, especially as the advent of driverless technology introduces its own risks and makes new vehicles all the more valuable. Now is the time to reign in auto exposure, before the cost of claims balloons even further.

The factors driving up commercial auto claims severity.

Data Opens Window to Driver Behavior

To better manage the total cost of commercial auto insurance, Blessing believes risk management should focus on the driver, not just the vehicle. In this journey, fleet telematics data plays a key role, unlocking insight on the driver behavior that contributes to accidents.

“Roughly half of large fleets have telematics built into their trucks,” Blessing said. “Traditionally, they are used to improve business performance by managing maintenance and routing to better control fuel costs. But we see opportunity there to improve driver performance, and so do risk managers.”

Liberty Mutual’s Managing Vital Driver Performance tool helps clients parse through data provided by telematics vendors and apply it toward cultivating safer driving habits.

“Risk managers can get overwhelmed with all of the data coming out of telematics. They may not know how to set the right parameters, or they get too many alerts from the provider,” Blessing said.

“We can help take that data and turn it into a concrete plan of action the customer can use to build a better risk management program by monitoring driver behavior, identifying the root causes of poor driving performance and developing training and other approaches to improve performance.”

Actions risk managers can take to better manage commercial auto frequency and severity trends.

Rather than focusing on the vehicle, the Managing Vital Driver Performance tool focuses on the driver, looking for indicators of aggressive driving that may lead to accidents, such as speeding, sharp turns and hard or sudden braking.

The tool helps a risk manager see if drivers consistently exhibit any of these behaviors, and take actions to improve driving performance before an accident happens. Liberty’s risk control consultants can also interview drivers to drill deeper into the data and find out what causes those behaviors in the first place.

Sometimes patterns of unsafe driving reveal issues at the management level.

“Our behavior-based program is also for supervisors and managers, not just drivers,” Blessing said. “This is where we help them set the tone and expectations with their drivers.”

For example, if data analysis and interviews reveal that fatigue factors into poor driving performance, management can identify ways to address that fatigue, including changing assigned work levels and requirements.  Are drivers expected to make too many deliveries in a single shift, or are they required to interact with dispatch while driving?

“Management support of safety is so important, and work levels and expectations should be realistic,” Blessing said.

A Consultative Approach

In addition to its Managing Vital Driver Performance tool, Liberty’s team of risk control consultants helps commercial auto policyholders establish screening criteria for new drivers, creating a “driver scorecard” to reflect a potential new hire’s driving record, any Motor Vehicle Reports, years of experience, and familiarity with the type of vehicle that a company uses.

“Our whole approach is consultative,” Blessing said. “We probe and listen and try to understand a client’s strengths and challenges, and then make recommendations to help them establish the best practices they need.”

“With our approach and tools, we do something no one else in the industry does, which is perform the root cause analysis to help prevent accidents, better protecting a commercial auto policyholder’s employees and bottom line.”

To learn more, visit https://business.libertymutualgroup.com/business-insurance/coverages/commercial-auto-insurance-policy.

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This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with Liberty Mutual Insurance. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.


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Liberty Mutual Insurance offers a wide range of insurance products and services, including general liability, property, commercial automobile, excess casualty, workers compensation and group benefits.
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