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3D Risks

3D Printing Offers New Risk Challenges

Revolutionary 3D printing processes offer known and unknown risks.
By: | March 17, 2014 • 3 min read
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As commercial 3D printing advances from occasional to routine use, the product liability landscape will shift around it. Defective and counterfeit product exposures, among others, will arise for all participants along the manufacturing continuum, industry experts said.

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In an adverse incident, said Rob Gaus, product risk leader, Marsh, liability will be apportioned among participants in the manufacturing and distribution stream: product manufacturer, printer manufacturer, software designer, feedstock supplier, distributor (especially if it modifies the product) and retailer (if the manufacturer is not well capitalized). No case law exists yet.

In 3D printing, a computer sends the software containing a product design to one or more printers, which builds the product, layer by layer, from many kinds of materials — plastics, metals, drugs, paints and even human tissue.

David Carlson, U.S. manufacturing and automotive practice leader, Marsh, said 3D-printed products are treated the same as any other new operation that poses new risks.

Underwriters and brokers must first assess the company’s risk management profile and risk appetite. When production, research and development teams look at technology, “they should loop in risk management. Risk management should be part of the continuum, or the company could get into sticky situations.”

The emerging risks include unregulated manufacturing, said Mark Schonfeld, a partner at Burns & Levinson LLP in Boston specializing in business and intellectual property law.

If 3D printing enables production of, say, just 100 hip implants or 100 hearing aids, such work will generally take place outside of a traditional mass-production factory, which is subject to government regulation and inspection.

“Insurance companies like FDA oversight of manufacturing because it makes products safer and helps identify responsibility when things go wrong,” Schonfeld said.

To protect themselves and their clients, Schonfeld advises insurers to keep abreast of technological developments, consult with a creative and knowledgeable attorney about how to address liability exposure, and adjust existing policies to be fair to consumers and prevent injury to the insurance company.

3D printing also raises the risk of counterfeit products, said Peter Dion, line of business director-product liability, Zurich Insurance. The digital “recipe” in the software design, and is vulnerable to capture, he said.

Although there is no encryption mechanism for the software, one solution might be to transfer the digital file in pieces only as they are needed by the printer to prevent capture of the entire design signature, Dion said.

Manufacturers have always struggled with counterfeit products, but 3D printing magnifies the risks because it can slash the time from product development to market-ready product to a matter of hours and requires no molds or prototypes. “Hackers can take the proprietary blueprint or software, send it to a third-world country, and have the product ready for market tomorrow,” said Carlson. “That’s a business disruption issue. Counterfeiters can put a company out of business.”

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Drug manufacturers may subvert counterfeiters by adding tracer elements and watermarks to their formulations, which protects their reputations, profits and public health. “If the counterfeiters get the recipe wrong, they might not produce high-quality drugs for public consumption,” Carlson said.

Other manufacturers can also use watermarks and digital rights management (DRM) software to prevent file sharing. Still, Carlson said, counterfeiting is an old problem. “Bad guys have always exploited new technologies for their personal gain.”

The materials used by manufacturers present a greater potential loss exposure than the 3D printer itself, said Dion, noting that it is just another piece of equipment, like a pencil or a lathe.

For example, if a 3D printer is used to replicate a cupcake, the manufacturer should be as careful of contaminants in the mix as traditional bakers need to be. “When 3D printer manufacturers purchase materials from suppliers, they need to perform due diligence on their supplier’s products also.”

Susannah Levine often writes about health care, education and technology. She can be reached at riskletters@lrp.com.
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Risk Insider: Joe Boren

Climate Change is Real and Hurts Our Industry

By: | June 19, 2014 • 2 min read
Joseph L. Boren is Chairman of the Environmental product line at Ironshore Holdings (U.S.) Inc., Executive Vice President of Ironshore Insurance Services, LLC, President of U.S. Field Operations and Director of Strategic Relations. He has experience in every segment of the environmental market; a regulator, practitioner, and insurer. Joe can be reached at joe.boren@ironshore.com.

While many aspects of managing environmental risks are very complicated, sometimes the direct relationship of a cause and its effect is clear.

In October of 1948, a historic air inversion over Donora, Pa., acted like an upside down fish bowl and trapped a layer of pollution from the local zinc and steel plants. Sulfuric acid, nitrogen dioxide, fluorine and other poisonous gases that usually were dispersed into the atmosphere mixed with fog to create a deadly smog. Twenty people died and 7,000 became ill, some seriously. Sixty years later, the New York Times described it as “one of the worst air pollution disasters in the nation’s history.” (Nov. 1, 2008)

 As I tell my friends, “if you want to be a climate change denier, do it quietly, alone, so others don’t know how foolish you are!” 

Dr. Devra Davis, director of the Center for Environmental Oncology of the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, after a long study, concluded that the pollutants trapped by stagnant air were the primary cause of deaths (Pittsburgh Gazette, Oct. 21, 2008).

While the science behind climate change is on a much larger scale than the Donora smog, the cause and effect are still the same. When we put a lot of “bad stuff” into the environment over a period of time, we are not going to like the results.

And who puts that “bad stuff” in the environment?  Man does. We do.  Climate change is man made, man caused. As I tell my friends, “if you want to be a climate change denier, do it quietly, alone, so others don’t know how foolish you are!”

In the recently concluded National Climate Assessment, White House Science Advisor John Holdren said, “The study is the loudest and clearest alarm bell to date signaling the need to take urgent action to combat the threats to Americans from climate change.” If you need more persuading, read the report here.

Most of us probably studied something other than science in school. That is not a reason to dismiss science. Science gave us a cure for polio, put a man on the moon and an iPhone in your pocket.

I can only guess at the motivations of some politicians who think climate change is a hoax, but we are an industry that studies facts, patterns and prior results. When you study the facts about climate change, I have no doubt you will be in agreement — climate change is real. It is happening.

Changing weather patterns are having an effect on our business. Droughts, wildfires, hurricanes, etc. … I understand energy fuels our economy. I would not advocate not using oil, coal or gas, which all generate emissions. I just believe they need to be used in a cleaner way. At the same time, wind, solar and nuclear have a role to play as well.

Not dealing with the issue of climate change has and will continue to have an adverse effect on our business.

When our industry sounds an alarm, people usually listen. It is time to clang the alarm.

Read all of Joe Boren’s Risk Insider contributions.

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Sponsored: Healthcare Solutions

Achieving More Fluid Case Management

Four tenured claims management professionals convene in a roundtable discussion.
By: | June 2, 2014 • 6 min read
SponsoredContent_HealthcSol

Risk management practitioners point to a number of factors that influence the outcome of workers’ compensation claims. But readily identifiable factors shouldn’t necessarily be managed in a box.

To identify and discuss the changing issues influencing workers’ compensation claim outcomes, Risk & Insurance®, in partnership with Duluth, Ga.-based Healthcare Solutions, convened an April roundtable discussion in Philadelphia.

The discussion, moderated by Dan Reynolds, editor-in-chief of Risk & Insurance®, featured participation from four tenured claims management professionals.

This roundtable was ruled by a pragmatic tone, characterized by declarations on solutions that are finding traction on many current workers’ compensation challenges.

The advantages of face-to-face case management visits with injured workers got some of the strongest support at the roundtable.

“What you can assess from somebody’s home environment, their motivation, their attitude, their desire to get well or not get well is easy to do when you are looking at somebody and sitting in their home,” participant Barb Ritz said, a workers’ compensation manager in the office of risk services at the Temple University Health System in Philadelphia.

Telephonic case management gradually replaced face-to-face visits in many organizations, but participants said the pendulum has swung back and face-to-face visits are again more widely valued.

In person visits are beneficial not only in assessing the claimant’s condition and attitude, but also in providing an objective ear to annotate the dialogue between doctors and patients.

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“Oftentimes, injured workers who go to physician appointments only retain about 20 percent of what the doctor is telling them,” said Jean Chambers, a Lakeland, Fla.-based vice president of clinical services for Bunch CareSolutions. “When you have a nurse accompanying the claimant, the nurse can help educate the injured worker following the appointment and also provide an objective update to the employer on the injured worker’s condition related to the claim.”

“The relationship that the nurse develops with the claimant is very important,” added Christine Curtis, a manager of medical services in the workers’ compensation division of New Cumberland, Pa.-based School Claims Services.

“It’s also great for fraud detection. During a visit the nurse can see symptoms that don’t necessarily match actions, and oftentimes claimants will tell nurses things they shouldn’t if they want their claim to be accepted,” Curtis said.

For these reasons and others, Curtis said that she uses onsite nursing.

Roundtable participant Susan LaBar, a Yardley, Pa.-based risk manager for transportation company Coach USA, said when she first started her job there, she insisted that nurses be placed on all lost-time cases. But that didn’t happen until she convinced management that it would work.

“We did it and the indemnity dollars went down and it more than paid for the nurses,” she said. “That became our model. You have to prove that it works and that takes time, but it does come out at the end of the day,” she said.

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The ultimate outcome

Reducing costs is reason enough for implementing nurse case management, but many say safe return-to-work is the ultimate measure of a good outcome. An aging, heavier worker population plagued by diabetes, hypertension, and orthopedic problems and, in many cases, painkiller abuse is changing the very definition of safe return-to-work.

Roundtable members were unanimous in their belief that offering even the most undemanding forms of modified duty is preferable to having workers at home for extended periods of time.

“Return-to-work is the only way to control the workers’ comp cost. It’s the only way,” said Coach USA’s Susan LaBar.

Unhealthy households, family cultures in which workers’ compensation fraud can be a way of life and physical and mental atrophy are just some of the pitfalls that modified duty and return-to-work in general can help stave off.

“I take employees back in any capacity. So long as they can stand or sit or do something,” Ritz said. “The longer you’re sitting at home, the longer you’re disconnected. The next thing you know you’re isolated and angry with your employer.”

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“Return-to-work is the only way to control the workers’ comp cost. It’s the only way,” said Coach USA’s Susan LaBar.

Whose story is it?

Managing return-to-work and nurse supervision of workers’ compensation cases also play important roles in controlling communication around the case. Return-to-work and modified duty can more quickly break that negative communication chain, roundtable participants said.

There was some disagreement among participants in the area of fraud. Some felt that workers’ compensation fraud is not as prevalent as commonly believed.

On the other hand, Coach USA’s Susan LaBar said that many cases start out with a legitimate injury but become fraudulent through extension.

“I’m talking about a process where claimants drag out the claim, treatment continues and they never come back to work,” she said.

 

Social media, as in all aspects of insurance fraud, is also playing an important role. Roundtable participants said Facebook is the first place they visit when they get a claim. Unbridled posts of personal information have become a rich library for case managers looking for indications of fraud.

“What you can assess from somebody’s home environment, their motivation, their attitude, their desire to get well or not get well is easy to do when you are looking at somebody and sitting in their home,” said participant Barb Ritz.

As daunting as co-morbidities have become, roundtable participants said that data has become a useful tool. Information about tobacco use, weight, diabetes and other complicating factors is now being used by physicians and managed care vendors to educate patients and better manage treatment.

“Education is important after an injury occurs,” said Rich Leonardo, chief sales officer for Healthcare Solutions, who also sat in on the roundtable. “The nurse is not always delivering news the patient wants to hear, so providing education on how the process is going to work is helpful.”

“We’re trying to get people to ‘Know your number’, such as to know what your blood pressure and glucose levels are,” said SCS’s Christine Curtis. “If you have somebody who’s diabetic, hypertensive and overweight, that nurse can talk directly to the injured worker and say, ‘Look, I know this is a sensitive issue, but we want you to get better and we’ll work with you because improving your overall health is important to helping you recover.”

The costs of co-morbidities are pushing case managers to be more frank in patient dialogue. Information about smoking cessation programs and weight loss approaches is now more freely offered.

Managing constant change

Anyone responsible for workers’ compensation knows that medical costs have been rising for years. But medical cost is not the only factor in the case management equation that is in motion.

The pendulum swing between technology and the human touch in treating injured workers is ever in flux. Even within a single program, the decision on when it is best to apply nurse case management varies.

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“It used to be that every claim went to a nurse and now the industry is more selective,” said Bunch CareSolutions’ Jean Chambers. “However, you have to be careful because sometimes it’s the ones that seem to be a simple injury that can end up being a million dollar claim.”

“Predictive analytics can be used to help organizations flag claims for case management, but the human element will never be replaced,” Leonardo concluded.

This article was produced by Healthcare Solutions and not the Risk & Insurance® editorial team.


Healthcare Solutions serves as a health services company delivering integrated solutions to the property and casualty markets, specializing in workers’ compensation and auto liability/PIP.
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