3D Risks

3D Printing Offers New Risk Challenges

Revolutionary 3D printing processes offer known and unknown risks.
By: | March 17, 2014 • 3 min read
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As commercial 3D printing advances from occasional to routine use, the product liability landscape will shift around it. Defective and counterfeit product exposures, among others, will arise for all participants along the manufacturing continuum, industry experts said.

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In an adverse incident, said Rob Gaus, product risk leader, Marsh, liability will be apportioned among participants in the manufacturing and distribution stream: product manufacturer, printer manufacturer, software designer, feedstock supplier, distributor (especially if it modifies the product) and retailer (if the manufacturer is not well capitalized). No case law exists yet.

In 3D printing, a computer sends the software containing a product design to one or more printers, which builds the product, layer by layer, from many kinds of materials — plastics, metals, drugs, paints and even human tissue.

David Carlson, U.S. manufacturing and automotive practice leader, Marsh, said 3D-printed products are treated the same as any other new operation that poses new risks.

Underwriters and brokers must first assess the company’s risk management profile and risk appetite. When production, research and development teams look at technology, “they should loop in risk management. Risk management should be part of the continuum, or the company could get into sticky situations.”

The emerging risks include unregulated manufacturing, said Mark Schonfeld, a partner at Burns & Levinson LLP in Boston specializing in business and intellectual property law.

If 3D printing enables production of, say, just 100 hip implants or 100 hearing aids, such work will generally take place outside of a traditional mass-production factory, which is subject to government regulation and inspection.

“Insurance companies like FDA oversight of manufacturing because it makes products safer and helps identify responsibility when things go wrong,” Schonfeld said.

To protect themselves and their clients, Schonfeld advises insurers to keep abreast of technological developments, consult with a creative and knowledgeable attorney about how to address liability exposure, and adjust existing policies to be fair to consumers and prevent injury to the insurance company.

3D printing also raises the risk of counterfeit products, said Peter Dion, line of business director-product liability, Zurich Insurance. The digital “recipe” in the software design, and is vulnerable to capture, he said.

Although there is no encryption mechanism for the software, one solution might be to transfer the digital file in pieces only as they are needed by the printer to prevent capture of the entire design signature, Dion said.

Manufacturers have always struggled with counterfeit products, but 3D printing magnifies the risks because it can slash the time from product development to market-ready product to a matter of hours and requires no molds or prototypes. “Hackers can take the proprietary blueprint or software, send it to a third-world country, and have the product ready for market tomorrow,” said Carlson. “That’s a business disruption issue. Counterfeiters can put a company out of business.”

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Drug manufacturers may subvert counterfeiters by adding tracer elements and watermarks to their formulations, which protects their reputations, profits and public health. “If the counterfeiters get the recipe wrong, they might not produce high-quality drugs for public consumption,” Carlson said.

Other manufacturers can also use watermarks and digital rights management (DRM) software to prevent file sharing. Still, Carlson said, counterfeiting is an old problem. “Bad guys have always exploited new technologies for their personal gain.”

The materials used by manufacturers present a greater potential loss exposure than the 3D printer itself, said Dion, noting that it is just another piece of equipment, like a pencil or a lathe.

For example, if a 3D printer is used to replicate a cupcake, the manufacturer should be as careful of contaminants in the mix as traditional bakers need to be. “When 3D printer manufacturers purchase materials from suppliers, they need to perform due diligence on their supplier’s products also.”

Susannah Levine writes about health care, education and technology. She can be reached at riskletters@lrp.com.
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Emerging Risk: Drones

Risky Flights

Drone risks include collisions with aircraft, invasion of privacy, aerial surveillance and data collection.
By: | March 2, 2015 • 2 min read
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The increasing use of drones for commercial purposes has become one of the biggest emerging threats to the future of airplane safety, according to Allianz Global Corporate & Specialty (AGCS).

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The use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) for a host of different applications may leave operators exposed to a whole new set of risks, including third-party damage or injury and liability, according to AGCS’s Global Aviation Safety Study.
One of the biggest risks, it said, was from radio frequency interference, resulting in loss of control, and, in the worst cases, fatalities.

Other problems include invasion of privacy, aerial surveillance and data collection.

“With the ability to collect massive amounts of unsolicited data, UAVs present an enormous threat to individual privacy and a significant challenge for insurance carriers,” said Vikki Stone, senior vice president at Poms & Associates Insurance Brokers. “In drafting policies, it is crucial for carriers to know how such information will be used.”

The production of UAVs has increased by double-digits year-on-year since 2007, according to AGCS, with applications ranging from news gathering and surveillance to sporting events and crop dusting.

Such has been the take-up that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) estimates that by 2020, there will be about 30,000 small commercial unmanned aircraft in our skies.

However, coverage is limited, with only about 21 insurers involved and those that do offer policies have been hampered by a lack of historical and analytical data, the study said.

“Annual utilization, number of accidents and repair costs are not readily available and unmanned aircraft are not presently flying at the rate that they will be in the near future in the national airspace,” the report said.

Another problem is that, despite FAA plans to integrate UAVs into the U.S. airspace in 2015, there is a “lack of international, regional and local regulations for the safe operation of UAVs,” said Henning Haagen, AGCS’s global head of aviation EMEA and Asia Pacific.

Stone said that the No. 1 concern among carriers was the lack of certification of UAV pilots.

“I think the bigger problems are going to be the people that don’t follow the guidelines required, so ultimately we’ll end up with a number of rogue flyers out there — that’s the scary part,” she said.

Peter Schmitz, CEO of global aviation specialty at Aon, outlined other major risks of drones.

“The biggest threat is clearly the taking down of a major aircraft in a mid-air collision,” he said.

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“The second issue is the application of these vehicles in urban areas where the risk of damage to properties and individuals is much greater than it would be in rural parts.”

Schmitz said that regulatory authorities across the world face an uphill task in coming to grips with these issues because UAVs are still a relatively new and unknown quantity in terms of repair costs and loss ratios.

Alex Wright is a U.K.-based business journalist, who previously was deputy business editor at The Royal Gazette in Bermuda. You can reach him at riskletters@lrp.com.
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Sponsored: Berkshire Hathaway Specialty Insurance

Healthcare: The Hardest Job in Risk Management

Do you have the support needed to successfully navigate healthcare challenges?
By: | April 1, 2015 • 4 min read

BrandedContent_BHSIThe Affordable Care Act.

Large-scale consolidation.

Radically changing cost and reimbursement models.

Rapidly evolving service delivery approaches.

It is difficult to imagine an industry more complex and uncertain than healthcare. Providers are being forced to lower costs and improve efficiencies on a scale that is almost beyond imagination. At the same time, quality of care must remain high.

After all, this is more than just a business.

The pressure on risk managers, brokers and CFOs is intense. If navigating these challenges wasn’t stress inducing enough, these professionals also need to ensure continued profitability.

Leo Carroll, Senior Vice President, Healthcare Professional Liability, Berkshire Hathaway Specialty Insurance

Leo Carroll, Senior Vice President, Healthcare Professional Liability, Berkshire Hathaway Specialty Insurance

“Healthcare companies don’t hide the fact that they’re looking to reduce costs and improve efficiencies in practically every facet of their business. Insurance purchasing and financing are high on that list,” said Leo Carroll, who heads the healthcare professional liability underwriting unit for Berkshire Hathaway Specialty Insurance.

But it’s about a lot more than just price. The complexity of the healthcare system and unique footprint of each provider requires customized solutions that can reduce risk, minimize losses and improve efficiencies.

“Each provider is faced with a different set of challenges. Therefore, our approach is to carefully listen to the needs of each client and respond with a creative proposal that often requires great flexibility on the part of our team,” explained Carroll.

Creativity? Flexibility? Those are not terms often used to describe an insurance carrier. But BHSI Healthcare is a new type of insurer.

The Foundation: Financial Strength

BrandedContent_BHSIBerkshire Hathaway is synonymous with financial strength. Leveraging the company’s well-capitalized balance sheet provides BHSI with unmatched capabilities to take on substantial risks in a sustainable way.

For one, BHSI is the highest rated paper available to healthcare providers. Given the severity of risks faced by the industry, this is a very important attribute.

But BHSI operationalizes its balance sheet in many ways beyond just strong financial ratings.

For example, BHSI has never relied on reinsurance. Without the need to manage those relationships, BHSI is able to eliminate a significant amount of overhead. The result is an industry leading expense ratio and the ability to pass on savings to clients.

“The impact of operationalizing our balance sheet is remarkable. We don’t impose our business needs on our clients. Our financial strength provides us the freedom to genuinely listen to our clients and propose unique, creative solutions,” Carroll said.

Keeping Things Simple

BrandedContent_BHSIHealthcare professional liability policy language is often bloated and difficult to decipher. Insurers are attempting to tackle complex, evolving issues and account for a broad range of scenarios and contingencies. The result often confuses and contradicts.

Carroll said BHSI strives to be as simple and straightforward as possible with policy language across all lines of business. It comes down to making it easy and transparent to do business with BHSI.

“Our goal is to be as straightforward as we can and at the same time provide coverage that’s meaningful and addresses the exposures our customers need addressed,” Carroll said.

Claims: More Than an After Thought

Complex litigation is an unfortunate fact of life for large healthcare customers. Carroll, who began his insurance career in medical claims management, understands how important complex claims management is to the BHSI value proposition.

In fact, “claims management is so critical to customers, that BHSI Claims contributes to all aspects of its operations – from product development through risk analysis, servicing and claims resolution,” said Robert Romeo, head of Healthcare and Casualty Claims.

And as part of the focus on building long-term relationships, BHSI has made it a priority to introduce customers to the claims team as early as possible and before a claim is made on a policy.

“Being so closely aligned automatically delivers efficiency and simplicity in the way we work,” explained Carroll. “We have a common understanding of our forms, endorsements and coverage, so there is less opportunity for disagreement or misunderstanding between what our underwriters wrote and how our claims professionals interpret it.”

Responding To Ebola: Creativity + Flexibility

BrandedContent_BHSIThe recent Ebola outbreak provided a prime example of BHSI Healthcare’s customer-centric approach in action.

Almost immediately, many healthcare systems recognized the need to improve their infectious disease management protocols. The urgency intensified after several nurses who treated Ebola patients were themselves infected.

BHSI Healthcare was uniquely positioned to rapidly respond. Carroll and his team approached several of their clients who were widely recognized as the leading infectious disease management institutions. With the help of these institutions, BHSI was able to compile tools, checklists, libraries and other materials.

These best practices were immediately made available to all BHSI Healthcare clients who leveraged the information to improve their operations.

At the same time, healthcare providers were at risk of multiple exposures associated with the evolving Ebola situation. Carroll and his Healthcare team worked with clients from a professional liability and general liability perspective. Concurrently, other BHSI groups worked with the same clients on offerings for business interruption, disinfection and cleaning costs.

David Fields, Executive Vice President, Underwriting, Actuarial, Finance and Reinsurance

David Fields, Executive Vice President, Underwriting, Actuarial, Finance and Reinsurance, Berkshire Hathaway Specialty Insurance

Ever vigilant, the BHSI chief underwriting officer, David Fields, created a point of central command to monitor the situation, field client requests and execute the company’s response. The results were highly customized packages designed specifically for several clients. On some programs, net limits exceeded $100 million and covered many exposures underwritten by multiple BHSI groups.

“At the height of the outbreak, there was a lot of fear and panic in the healthcare industry. Our team responded not by pulling back but by leaning in. We demonstrated that we are risk seekers and as an organization we can deploy our substantial resources in times of crisis. The results were creative solutions and very substantial coverage options for our clients,” said Carroll.

It turns out that creativity and flexibly requires both significant financial resources and passionate professionals. That is why no other insurer can match Berkshire Hathaway Specialty Insurance.

To learn more about BHSI Healthcare, please visit www.bhspecialty.com.

Berkshire Hathaway Specialty Insurance (www.bhspecialty.com) provides commercial property, casualty, healthcare professional liability, executive and professional lines, surety, travel, programs, and homeowners insurance. It underwrites on the paper of Berkshire Hathaway’s National Indemnity group of insurance companies, which hold financial strength ratings of A++ from AM Best and AA+ from Standard & Poor’s. Based in Boston, Berkshire Hathaway Specialty Insurance has regional underwriting offices in Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles, New York, San Francisco, Toronto, Hong Kong, Singapore and New Zealand. For more information, contact info@bhspecialty.com.

The information contained herein is for general informational purposes only and does not constitute an offer to sell or a solicitation of an offer to buy any product or service. Any description set forth herein does not include all policy terms, conditions and exclusions. Please refer to the actual policy for complete details of coverage and exclusions.

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This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with Berkshire Hathaway Specialty Insurance. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.




Berkshire Hathaway Specialty Insurance (www.bhspecialty.com) provides commercial property, casualty, healthcare professional liability, executive and professional lines, surety, travel, programs, and homeowners insurance.
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