Katie Siegel

Katie Siegel is a staff writer at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]

2016 Risk All Star: Carlos Dezayas

Freeing Cargo From Captivity

Kraft and Heinz announced their merger in the spring of 2015, around the time of Heinz’s May 1st renewal. The impending marriage spurred Senior Manager of Corporate Risk Management Carlos Dezayas to rejigger his insurance portfolio ahead of the acquisition’s finalization.

“We were looking for the most efficient structure for the combined program so that everything would be in place on day one of the merger,” Dezayas said.

He found that the Kraft Heinz cargo program was sorely in need of an overhaul.

Carlos Dezayas Senior Manager, Corporate Risk Management, The Kraft Heinz Company

Carlos Dezayas
Senior Manager, Corporate Risk Management, The Kraft Heinz Company

“The cargo program was run through our captive, with a $25,000 retention held at the business unit level and a $225,000 retention at the captive. The problem was that we only had captive licenses in the EU, U.S., Canada, Australia and New Zealand,” he said.

This meant that import/export operations from countries such as China, Japan, Korea, Costa Rica and Brazil were vulnerable. Whenever a claim breached the local deductible but not the captive deductible, it was difficult to get cash into those countries to make claim payments; large cash infusions were subject to a variety of local taxes.

Heinz also could not collect premium from the unlicensed countries.

“Essentially we were overcharging the business units in the licensed countries to make up for the fact that we could not charge any premium from the unlicensed countries,” Dezayas said.

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Working with Marsh broker Herman Brito, Dezayas removed the cargo program from the captive structure, retained the local business unit deductibles and established locally admitted policies written by AIG.

The move was atypical — most companies don’t move from a captive to a fully insured plan — but it paid off.

“A year and a half down the road, this seems to be a more stable structure for us,” he said.

“It has allowed the business units to be comfortable knowing we have the coverage in place and that their claims will be paid. It also creates more visibility and transparency across the entire program, which is what senior management expects from their insurance portfolio.”

“[The new program structure] has allowed the business units to be comfortable knowing we have the coverage in place and that their claims will be paid.” — Carlos Dezayas, senior manager, corporate risk management, The Kraft Heinz Co.

In addition to increasing efficiency, the new non-captive structure also means Kraft Heinz can collect premium from every business unit while shifting administrative and claims management expenses away from the captive.

Brito, assistant vice president at Marsh, and a 2016 Power Broker® winner, praised Dezayas for his willingness to tackle a project outside of his area of expertise.

“Carlos came from a strong insurance background, but not particularly in marine. When we were undergoing our renewal strategy, he quickly familiarized himself with marine terminology and set out to learn the latest and greatest in the marine world — not an easy task,” Brito said.

“He took the time to walk through the policy language with me and ask the right questions. He was willing to put his trust in Marsh when we discussed changing the captive structure for cargo and was always extremely responsive.” &

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AllStars2016v1oRisk All Stars stand out from their peers by overcoming challenges through exceptional problem solving, creativity, perseverance and passion.

See the complete list of 2016 Risk All Stars.

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Risk Management

The Profession

Skanska USA Building’s VP of Insurance and Surety knows that sharing data helps combat risk of all kinds.
By: | September 14, 2016 • 4 min read

R&I: What was your first job?

I was a financial analyst with Household Finance Corp. after graduating from college.

R&I: How did you come to work in risk management?

I was an accountant for a long time in the construction industry. Once I became a financial manager, that role started to take on some risk management responsibilities and sort of became a dual role. Then the opportunity came up to move to Skanska and do it full time, so that’s what I did.

R&I: What is the risk management community doing right?

We’re taking a much more holistic view of risk instead of staying in silos, so it’s not just about insurance, it’s not just about financial risk, or any one thing. It’s about looking at the business holistically.

R&I: What could the risk management community be doing a better job of?

We could be doing a way better job of sharing data around both leading and lagging indicators of what’s driving risk decisions. We all have enough data to get an individual picture of how our businesses are doing, but we’re not sharing very well within the industry.

09152016_profession_johnson

R&I: What was the best location and year for the RIMS conference and why?

I’ve never been to RIMS. I’ve always gone to IRMI. I would say San Diego has been the best location for that conference because of the great weather, which makes for a nice place for people to relax and get together. IRMI is usually in early November, and that time of year, not every location is nice. But in San Diego it’s almost always a nice day, and that makes people want to go out and meet each other.

R&I: What’s been the biggest change in the risk management and insurance industry since you’ve been in it?

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As a New York contractor, the biggest change has been the exposures in New York and emphasis on our industry there. It seems that now in construction there’s everywhere else, and then there’s New York; it’s become a separate entity.

Another change has been the sharing of risk between us and the insurance industry. When I came into the industry, we were leaving most of the risk with the insurer, and now we’re taking on much more of it ourselves and sharing it with carriers.

R&I: What emerging commercial risk most concerns you?

Labor risk is huge. The subcontractor community is stretched very thin both in terms of labor and the number of projects that are out there. I know everyone wants to talk about cyber risk, but talent shortage is a more critical risk for our business right now. Everything else will fall apart if we don’t fix that problem first.

R&I: How much business do you do direct versus going through a broker?

We do everything through a broker.

R&I: Is the contingent commission controversy overblown?

Yes. Even if a broker bundles up a bunch of policies, they still have to sell you what you need and the policy still has to do what it has to do. If bundling together a good policy over multiple clients gives them the ability to make a few extra dollars on it, I don’t have a problem with that. It just has to be transparent.  Transparency is what it comes down to.

R&I: Are you optimistic about the U.S. economy or pessimistic and why?

I’m cautiously optimistic. I think better days are ahead if we don’t overthink or overregulate ourselves.

R&I: Who is your mentor and why?

I couldn’t identify one person, but I do have a few folks that I rely on. I’m a strong believer that you need a variety of points of view.

R&I: What have you accomplished that you are proudest of?

From a personal perspective, it’s raising four kids that so far — knock on wood — seem to be solid citizens.

R&I: What is your favorite book or movie?

I love science fiction and fantasy movies. I have not seen the new Star Trek yet, but that’s on my list.

R&I: What’s the best restaurant you’ve ever eaten at?

There are way too many in New York to choose just one.

R&I: What is the most unusual/interesting place you have ever visited?

Prague, in the Czech Republic. I was there for business and extended the trip. I’ve been to quite a few cities in Europe, and there’s usually some area that’s historic, and in Prague that area is much larger. It’s full of shops and restaurants and interesting sights.

R&I: What about this work do you find the most fulfilling or rewarding?

Helping my folks on a day-to-day basis get through whatever roadblocks they encounter. I like to use my own expertise to help them move their day along and solve whatever problem is bogging them down.

R&I: What do your friends and family think you do?

As hard as I try, it’s tough for them to understand. Saying that I buy insurance isn’t really descriptive of what I do because it happens only occasionally. My son is a civil engineer, so he understands parts of it. I’m really working hard with my three daughters to get them interested in the construction business, because there are so many things you can do.




Katie Siegel is a staff writer at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]
Share this article:

Risk Management

The Profession

Skanska USA Building’s VP of Insurance and Surety knows that sharing data helps combat risk of all kinds.
By: | September 14, 2016 • 4 min read

R&I: What was your first job?

I was a financial analyst with Household Finance Corp. after graduating from college.

R&I: How did you come to work in risk management?

I was an accountant for a long time in the construction industry. Once I became a financial manager, that role started to take on some risk management responsibilities and sort of became a dual role. Then the opportunity came up to move to Skanska and do it full time, so that’s what I did.

R&I: What is the risk management community doing right?

We’re taking a much more holistic view of risk instead of staying in silos, so it’s not just about insurance, it’s not just about financial risk, or any one thing. It’s about looking at the business holistically.

R&I: What could the risk management community be doing a better job of?

We could be doing a way better job of sharing data around both leading and lagging indicators of what’s driving risk decisions. We all have enough data to get an individual picture of how our businesses are doing, but we’re not sharing very well within the industry.

09152016_profession_johnson

R&I: What was the best location and year for the RIMS conference and why?

I’ve never been to RIMS. I’ve always gone to IRMI. I would say San Diego has been the best location for that conference because of the great weather, which makes for a nice place for people to relax and get together. IRMI is usually in early November, and that time of year, not every location is nice. But in San Diego it’s almost always a nice day, and that makes people want to go out and meet each other.

R&I: What’s been the biggest change in the risk management and insurance industry since you’ve been in it?

Advertisement




As a New York contractor, the biggest change has been the exposures in New York and emphasis on our industry there. It seems that now in construction there’s everywhere else, and then there’s New York; it’s become a separate entity.

Another change has been the sharing of risk between us and the insurance industry. When I came into the industry, we were leaving most of the risk with the insurer, and now we’re taking on much more of it ourselves and sharing it with carriers.

R&I: What emerging commercial risk most concerns you?

Labor risk is huge. The subcontractor community is stretched very thin both in terms of labor and the number of projects that are out there. I know everyone wants to talk about cyber risk, but talent shortage is a more critical risk for our business right now. Everything else will fall apart if we don’t fix that problem first.

R&I: How much business do you do direct versus going through a broker?

We do everything through a broker.

R&I: Is the contingent commission controversy overblown?

Yes. Even if a broker bundles up a bunch of policies, they still have to sell you what you need and the policy still has to do what it has to do. If bundling together a good policy over multiple clients gives them the ability to make a few extra dollars on it, I don’t have a problem with that. It just has to be transparent.  Transparency is what it comes down to.

R&I: Are you optimistic about the U.S. economy or pessimistic and why?

I’m cautiously optimistic. I think better days are ahead if we don’t overthink or overregulate ourselves.

R&I: Who is your mentor and why?

I couldn’t identify one person, but I do have a few folks that I rely on. I’m a strong believer that you need a variety of points of view.

R&I: What have you accomplished that you are proudest of?

From a personal perspective, it’s raising four kids that so far — knock on wood — seem to be solid citizens.

R&I: What is your favorite book or movie?

I love science fiction and fantasy movies. I have not seen the new Star Trek yet, but that’s on my list.

R&I: What’s the best restaurant you’ve ever eaten at?

There are way too many in New York to choose just one.

R&I: What is the most unusual/interesting place you have ever visited?

Prague, in the Czech Republic. I was there for business and extended the trip. I’ve been to quite a few cities in Europe, and there’s usually some area that’s historic, and in Prague that area is much larger. It’s full of shops and restaurants and interesting sights.

R&I: What about this work do you find the most fulfilling or rewarding?

Helping my folks on a day-to-day basis get through whatever roadblocks they encounter. I like to use my own expertise to help them move their day along and solve whatever problem is bogging them down.

R&I: What do your friends and family think you do?

As hard as I try, it’s tough for them to understand. Saying that I buy insurance isn’t really descriptive of what I do because it happens only occasionally. My son is a civil engineer, so he understands parts of it. I’m really working hard with my three daughters to get them interested in the construction business, because there are so many things you can do.




Katie Siegel is a staff writer at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]
Share this article: