Roberto Ceniceros

Roberto Ceniceros is senior editor at Risk & Insurance® and chair of the National Workers' Compensation and Disability Conference® & Expo. He can be reached at [email protected] Read more of his columns and features.

Quality-Based Care

Bundled Care’s Place in Workers’ Comp

Bundled care programs are one alternative care model emphasizing quality over quantity.
By: | August 8, 2016 • 5 min read
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Medicare continues wielding its leverage to push the nation’s medical systems away from fee-for-service arrangements toward alternative payment models expected to improve care quality.

But one mainstay alternative medical treatment model — bundled care— is off to a slow start in workers’ compensation as implementation hurdles remain.

Very few bundled care models have emerged for treating injured workers. Yet workers’ comp experts expect that the bundled payment concept will eventually flow into more treatments for workplace injuries.

Jacob Lazarovic, senior VP and chief medical officer, Broadspire

Jacob Lazarovic, senior VP and chief medical officer, Broadspire

“I think we will get there,” said Jacob Lazarovic, senior VP and chief medical officer at Broadspire, a third party administrator with a large workers’ comp book of business.

“There will be models that work,” he continued. “There will be entities that manage to put it together. I am pretty sure we are going to see an expansion of programs,” including a potential bundled care program Broadspire is developing for injured worker outpatient surgeries.

Bundled care and bundled payment refers to the coordinated delivery of all medical provider services needed to address a specific illness or injury. A medical group or hospital, for example, would bundle all services including imaging, anesthesia, surgery, follow-up doctor visits and physical therapy for repairing a knee or hip.

They would do so for one single bundled fee that includes financial incentives holding providers accountable for quality outcomes.

In contrast, under fee-for-service arrangements that dominate U.S. health care, claims payers receive bills for each patient interaction with a provider, encouraging treatment quantity over quality.

But Medicare is aggressively pushing nationwide adoption of value-based care delivery models, including bundled care. By the end of 2018, Medicare wants half of its payments flowing to alternative payment models.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services continues unfurling mandates to make that happen. In July, it announced that hospitals in nearly 100 markets would be accountable for the financial and quality outcomes associated with bypass surgeries and heart attacks.

By bundling care for those treatments Rising provides insurers, TPAs and self-insured employers greater cost predictability, administrative efficiency, and “concierge” level of service” for injured worker.

That follows a 2015 announcement impacting nearly 800 hospitals with a mandate for bundled programs for hip and knee replacements.

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Experts frequently cite the government efforts among reasons they expect bundled payments will eventually spread from Medicare arrangements to private contracts such as those arranged to care for group health and workers’ compensation claimants.

Medicare’s efforts, for example, should help accustom medical provider groups to contracting with each other to arrange bundles.

“With Medicare we’ve seen quick diffusion of bundled payments,” said Shawn Matheson, a manager at Leavitt Partners, a health care consultant and intelligence firm. That will help private industry claims payers evaluate CMS challenges and successes as a base for additional program designs, Matheson added.

Developing Bundled Programs

For now, though, several workers’ comp observers said they can only cite two or three existing bundled care programs for treating worker injuries while other efforts are under development.

Treatment at the University of California Los Angeles’ Center for Behavioral & Addiction Medicine, for instance, is available through a bundled care program that R&Q Healthcare Interests arranged for workers’ comp claims payers.

“But it is important to recognize there are some difficult problems to be solved in comp that start with return to work and how you hold people accountable.” — David Deitz, managed care expert, David Deitz and Associates

R&Q’s program for injured worker pain and addiction treatment is the first bundled offering the company expects to develop under an existing contract it has with the entire University of California system, said Bill Lape, CEO at R&Q Healthcare, a unit of Randall & Quilter Investment Holding Ltd.

Broadspire, meanwhile, teamed up with a medical network provider to explore developing a pilot program of ambulatory surgery facilities offering bundled services for injured-workers, Lazarovic said.

Robert Evans, VP of repricing solutions, Rising Medical Solutions

Robert Evans, VP of repricing solutions, Rising Medical Solutions

Ideally, the arrangement would allow the collection of metrics for measuring outcomes such as patient satisfaction and return to work.

And Rising Medical Solutions now offers workers’ comp surgery care programs in regions of Illinois, Florida, New Jersey and Georgia. Those regions generally experience greater variation than normal in the pricing of routine surgeries for treating problems such as knee injuries and carpal tunnel syndrome, said Robert Evans, VP of repricing solutions at Rising.

By bundling care for those treatments Rising provides insurers, TPAs and self-insured employers greater cost predictability, administrative efficiency, and “concierge” level of service for injured workers, Evans said.

Evans will speak in November at the National Workers’ Compensation and Disability Conference & Expo in New Orleans as part of a panel discussion on strategies for bringing value-based care, like bundled arrangements, to workers’ comp.

Broadspire’s Lazarovic will also speak at NWCDC during a presentation titled “How to Use a Medical Expert So You Don’t Get Burned on Causation.” The conference agenda is available at www.wcconference.com.

Fee-for-service’s entrenchment in workers’ comp medical care, meanwhile, and work comp’s emphasis on issues that don’t exist in group health, like return to work, are slowing adoption of bundled care for injured workers.

David Deitz, managed care expert, David Deitz and Associates

David Deitz, managed care expert, David Deitz and Associates

Bundling care for ailments commonly diagnosed among injured works, like carpal tunnel syndrome, would be straight forward, said David Deitz, a managed care expert at David Deitz and Associates. But holding medical providers accountable for return to work remains a challenge.

Accountability could be difficult to enforce if, say, medical providers repair a worker’s injury as expected, but for some other reason the employee decides not to return to the job, Deitz elaborated.

“I think there is a really difficult problem here [but] it’s not insolvable,” Dietz said. “But it is important to recognize there are some difficult problems to be solved in comp that start with return to work and how you hold people accountable.”

Other obstacles to implementing bundled programs for injured workers include work comp’s state-by-state regulation and entrenched reliance on medical fee schedules based on fee-for-service arrangements.

Roberto Ceniceros is senior editor at Risk & Insurance® and chair of the National Workers' Compensation and Disability Conference® & Expo. He can be reached at [email protected] Read more of his columns and features.
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Combating Opioid Abuse

Bluegrass State Leads the Opioid Fight

Kentucky, long poisoned by the opioid epidemic, is turning its experiences into strategies that can help other states drive change.
By: | August 3, 2016 • 5 min read
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Central Appalachia earned a distinction as the epicenter of the nation’s opioid-addiction epidemic for a number of reasons. Two key factors are the complex injuries suffered by coal miners and the physical demands placed on workers toiling in other hazardous industries in that region such as logging and trucking.

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Others include the region’s economic misfortunes, lax prescribing practices, access to pill mills, and pharmaceutical company marketing.  All led to an ongoing drug-abuse scourge that surfaced there in the 1990s, studies and observers report.

“Central Appalachia, which for us is eastern Kentucky, was one of the first areas to see the opioid epidemic explode in the 1990s,” said former Bluegrass State attorney general Jack Conway. “Because in Appalachia you had mining, you had a lot of heavy industry, trucking, and more workplace injuries on average than you would in other parts of the state. You saw an increase in the prescribing and utilization of opioids and it created an addiction epidemic.”

“I think we have more tools in the states that have been battling this [opioid epidemic] for some time. That has made us stronger in the ability to control it.”  — Cindy Whitehouse, CEO and founder, Ascential Care

Now, as the rest of the nation experiences opioid abuse patterns seen early on across Central Appalachia, Kentucky provides examples for battling back against the epidemic.

In 2012, Kentucky became the first state among jurisdictions adopting stricter prescription-drug monitoring programs (PDMPs) with objective criteria mandating when prescribers must register and review a state database of patient prescription histories, Brandeis University’s PDMP Center of Excellence reports.

State PDMPs seek to change provider prescribing practices and prevent patients from doctor-shopping to obtain multiple prescriptions.

Kentucky’s latest PDMP was born from a 2012 comprehensive law adopted to combat opioid abuse.

“Kentucky has a great [PDMP] system,” said Tom Clark, research associate for the Brandeis Center of Excellence. “It is very well supported by the state. Of course, this is all a response to Kentucky being in the epicenter of the prescription drug abuse epidemic and it has been for a long time.”

While all states except Missouri have PDMP laws, participation in many states remains voluntary, said Brian Allen, VP of government affairs for Optum workers’ comp and auto no-fault. In the last three years or so, however, more jurisdictions are making their use mandatory.

“There has been a lot more renewed emphasis on [PDMPs] because everybody has been trying to get their heads around this opioid problem,” he said.

A May 2016 Center of Excellence report with data from Kentucky and the other states indicates that increased PDMP use immediately impacts controlled substance prescribing and doctor-shopping.

Yet only a few states have laws as strict as Kentucky’s, requiring all prescribers to register and check their PDMPs when initially prescribing opioids and benzodiazepines, and again every three months when continuing the prescriptions, the PDMP Center of Excellence reports.

Meanwhile, reports linking Central Appalachia’s work injuries to drug abuse have persisted for years.

A 2002 combined U.S. Justice Department and Kentucky State Police assessment described a growing threat from prescription painkillers. The threat was so specific to Appalachia that opioids and opiates became known disrespectfully as “hillbilly heroin.”

“In the eastern coal mining counties of Kentucky, the large-scale diversion and abuse of painkillers are particular problems,” the report warned. “In the past, coal miners spent hours each day crouched in narrow mine shafts. Painkillers were dispensed by coal mine camp doctors in an attempt to keep the miners working. Self-medicating became a way of life for miners, and this practice often led to abuse and addiction among individuals who would have been disinclined to abuse traditional illicit drugs.”

Michelle Landers, VP and general counsel for Kentucky Employers Mutual Insurance, agreed that eastern Kentucky’s historical dependence on coal mines, and related service industries like trucking, helped link workplace injuries and chronic pain with opioid use.

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KEMI, which issues policies to coal mines, is the Bluegrass State’s largest workers’ comp insurer.

Coal operations provide one of eastern Kentucky’s few employment opportunities.

Mining also produces severe workplace injuries, caused by accidents such as cave-ins or heavy machinery malfunctions, Landers said.

“We have, from early on, taken the approach that if we don’t feel it’s appropriate and we don’t get cooperation from the physician, we are going to challenge it.” — Michelle Landers, VP and general counsel, Kentucky Employers Mutual Insurance

“It’s not an industry where you are going to have small injuries,” she elaborated.

“They are typically severe or the chronic type of injuries you expect from people being underground.”

Kentucky’s private-industry workers, in general, experience a high injury rate. U.S. Department of Labor statistics for 2014 ranked Kentucky among 19 states with a recordable injury rate significantly higher than the national average.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data for the same year, meanwhile, shows Kentucky among five states with the nation’s highest rate of overdose deaths.

Early Adopter

KEMI first discovered a frequent use of the narcotic OxyContin to treat work injuries after contracting with a pharmacy benefit manager in 2001, Landers said. The PBM data revealed questionable practices, such as doctors prescribing high doses of the drugs early in the course of treatment for back strains.

“We were seeing things out there about the high levels of addiction and [overdose] deaths and we didn’t want to contribute to that,” Landers said.

Cindy Whitehouse, CEO and founder, Ascential Care

Cindy Whitehouse, CEO and founder, Ascential Care

So KEMI became an early adopter of measures like educating adjusters and nurse case managers about the dangers of opioids and teaching them to recognize red flags, such as doctors prescribing the drugs for longer periods than typically appropriate.

KEMI also used PBM data to identify frequently prescribing doctors.

“If you were treating with one of those [doctors] that might be a red flag,” Landers said.

KEMI’s concerted efforts included using its attorneys to engage in medical-fee disputes challenging claims before administrative judges when inappropriate prescribing occurred.

“We have, from early on, taken the approach that if we don’t feel it’s appropriate and we don’t get cooperation from the physician, we are going to challenge it,” Landers said.

Landers will speak at the 25th Annual National Workers’ Compensation and Disability Conference® & Expo on Dec. 1, during a presentation titled “Lessons Learned From Fighting Drug Abuse in the Opioid-Crisis Epicenter.”

The 2012 Kentucky law has limited prescription abuse. In addition to requiring prescribers to report to the state PDMP, it also regulated pain clinics.

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A 2015 study prepared by the Institute of Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy at the University of Kentucky reported that since the law’s passage, prescribers registering with the PDMP increased by 262 percent, while annual prescriber queries into the PDMP rose 650 percent.

Prescriptions for controlled drugs decreased 4 percent to 8 percent during the same period.

Appalachia still has issues, but the situation is improving.

“I think we have more tools in the states that have been battling this [opioid epidemic] for some time,” said Cindy Whitehouse, CEO and founder of Ascential Care, a Lexington, Ky.-based managed care company. &

Roberto Ceniceros is senior editor at Risk & Insurance® and chair of the National Workers' Compensation and Disability Conference® & Expo. He can be reached at [email protected] Read more of his columns and features.
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Column: Workers' Comp

In Support of Monitoring

By: | August 3, 2016 • 2 min read
Roberto Ceniceros is senior editor at Risk & Insurance® and chair of the National Workers' Compensation and Disability Conference® & Expo. He can be reached at [email protected] Read more of his columns and features.

State prescription drug monitoring programs can help prevent the ruin of families, overdose deaths and other steep costs society pays for the nation’s opioid drug abuse epidemic.

In narrower workers’ compensation terms, the databases can stop injured workers and other patients from slipping into addiction and the illegal activity that drives claims costs. PDMPs track prescriptions and alert prescribers and pharmacists when claimants doctor-shop to obtain multiple pharmacy fills, either to use the drugs themselves or sell them.

The information can help stop such activity and detect when a patient might need an intervention.

The benefits of PDMP laws make it absurd that Missouri remains the nation’s only state without one, after a legislative bid to adopt a law failed again there this year.

Conservative organizations opposed the bill, arguing that it represented an unnecessary invasion of privacy.

Recent studies also show that PDMPs do reduce doctor-shopping and help change prescriber behavior so that fewer inappropriate prescriptions are written.

Organizations such as the American Insurance Association, the Missouri Chamber of Commerce and Industry, and the Missouri Hospital Association. backed it. They argued that a PDMP law shields families from drug abuse and improves workplace safety.

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Existing PDMP laws vary widely across states.  Some call only for voluntary participation. But in contrast to Missouri’s failure to implement a PDMP, more states are responding to the opioid-abuse epidemic by making their existing PDMPs more stringent and including mandates for prescribers.

Three years ago, 13 states had laws mandating prescribers to register with or query their state PDMPs.

By May 2016, about 30 states had mandates, and more are expected to join the trend, according to the Brandeis University PDMP Center of Excellence.

Recent studies also show that PDMPs do reduce doctor-shopping and help change prescriber behavior so that fewer inappropriate prescriptions are written.

Kudos to states adopting strong PDMP laws for helping patients, their families and the rest of society.

Billions of dollars are now spent on the nonmedical use of prescription opioids including crime expenses, the cost of addiction treatment, and lost worker productivity.

Missouri isn’t the only state that can do more to help, though. States also need to adopt multijurisdictional pacts allowing the sharing of PDMP data across borders.

Such pacts can prevent traveling to neighboring states to avoid detection.

That is occurring along the Kentucky-Missouri border. Kentucky has one of the nation’s most stringent PDMP laws. But sources tell me they have seen some workers’ compensation claims from injured workers that crossed into Missouri to get meds.

There are legitimate concerns about implementing stringent PDMPs. If they are inefficient and cumbersome they can excessively tax doctors’ offices, which must commit staff resources to access the databases.

So states need to support their PDMP laws and provide the resources necessary to make their systems easy to navigate.

Claims that a potential invasion of privacy is more important than the opioid problem are overblown.

Solving complicated problems requires multiple tools and PDMPs are a tool proving their worth. &

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