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It’s All About Content

Sleeker. Bolder. More responsive. In a word - immersive.

A more immersive reading experience? We’re glad you asked. A cleaner layout and typographic design keeps your focus on the content. The “infinite scroll,” simplified navigation and Google search make finding interesting articles easier. And no matter your screen size – PC, tablet or phone – the site is optimized to ensure the same great experience.

The benefits of the site are mostly self-evident. But a few features are worth highlighting to help get you started:

Article Pages

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Current Section: Displays the issue, topic, author or section you are currently viewing.

Content Ribbon: Lists all of the articles in the current section. Easily browse the articles and click on any tile to load that article into the infinite scroll.

Infinite Scroll: Read each article from top to bottom without having to click to continue. The next article loads automatically so you can continuously read/browse an entire issue or section – similar to how you read a print magazine.

Full Screen: Click the arrow to hide the content ribbon and create a clutter-free article reading experience. Also handy for smaller screens or tablets.

More Ways to Explore

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Nav Bar: Click the gray bar to reveal several filters, sections and topics that tailor articles to your interests. 

Authors/Topics: Reading an article you like? Click on the author’s name to see all of their content or click on one of the topics to load that section.

Google Search: Still not finding what you want? The search bar slides out to help you find it.

Responsive Design (Mobile Optimized) 

The site utilizes a responsive design. That means the layout automatically adjusts to different screen sizes. You can see the technology in action by adjusting the size of your browser window. It’s pretty cool.

But responsive design is more than just a neat trick. It ensures that our new site looks great and works well on all screen sizes. Call us a website or, if you like, a web app – the site combines the benefits of the free and open web with the elegance of an application.

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More to Come

But we are not done yet. The site enables us to integrate new content types into our stories. Over the next year, you will see more charts, graphs, infographics, videos, photos, etc.

Be sure to sign-up for one of our newsletters to stay abreast of all these developments as well as the latest articles and content we publish.

In the meantime, we would love to hear your feedback about the new site or anything else we do. Write to us at riskletters@lrp.com.

Risk Scenario

The Plague of Baltimore

A hospital group grows by acquiring medical talent. But growth comes with unanticipated risks.
By: | January 7, 2014 • 8 min read
Risk Scenarios are created by Risk & Insurance editors along with leading industry partners. The hypothetical, yet realistic stories, showcase emerging risks that can result in significant losses if not properly addressed.

Disclaimer: The events depicted in this scenario are fictitious. Any similarity to any corporation or person, living or dead, is merely coincidental.

A Disturbing Email

Carley Fitzpatrick flipped the line and the blueberry-colored, 7-inch, Texas-rigged rubber worm sank, almost motionless, next to the sunken tree that projected from the near bank of Lake Rita.

Scenario_PlagueOfBaltimore

She inhaled and exhaled deeply, balancing herself on the wooden seat of the canoe. Must be calm, she reminded herself, must be very calm and settled to do this right.

Carley looked away from her target, to where the sun was banking down below the green crest of trees on the ridge above the lake.

She twitched her rod tip once; paused for several seconds and then twitched it again. Then came the long, strong pull that signified a largemouth bass had sucked in the artificial worm.

She hooked him, netted him, took a brief admiring glance and put him back in the water unharmed.

Paddling back to her SUV, Carley remembered that she wanted to check back in with the office before going home. As the COO of Blue Mountain Regional Medical Center in York County, she was a key player in the hospital group’s expansion plans, putting in extra hours as it built itself into a larger system.

With the outdoorsy Central Pennsylvania lifestyle as a draw, Blue Mountain was successful in drawing talent from Washington, D.C., Philadelphia, Baltimore and Harrisburg. Making the switch from freeways and subways to the countryside dotted with horse farms and wineries was not that hard a sell.

With health care reform on the march, there were a number of smaller, more urban practices that were more than willing to have their assets and liabilities acquired by a hospital system. Health care reform just created too many uncertainties.

Back at the office, Carley opened a disturbing email from the office of Blue Mountain’s general counsel.

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Scenario Partner

The email said that 12 hospitalists in a Baltimore practice that Blue Mountain had acquired six months ago were now defendants in a class-action lawsuit stemming from a hospital-acquired infection outbreak at a Baltimore teaching hospital.

The outbreak had been dubbed “The Plague of Baltimore” by the local press.

“Sending this to you as an FYI, we’re not too concerned about it at this point,” Blue Mountain’s youngish general counsel had typed to Carley in the email.

“I’m not so sure that we shouldn’t be worried about it,” Carley said to herself under her breath as the sky outside her office window darkened into nightfall.

“Can you follow up with me on this or direct me to a copy of the lawsuit?” she wrote back to the general counsel.

Carley had been around long enough to know that Baltimore, along with some other East Coast cities like Philadelphia, fell into the category of  legal venue where judge and jury verdicts in personal injury cases could balloon far beyond what might be considered reasonable reparation.

The general counsel may have been good on paper at Dickinson Law, but he just might have a lot left to learn here in the real world.

Carley made a mental note to keep the “Baltimore 12” on her radar.

Poll Question

With the health care practices that you have acquired, how well versed are you on the prior acts exposures these physicians may carry with them?

View Results

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Look Back in Anguish

With the fate of the “Baltimore 12” never leaving her consciousness for long, Carley called a meeting with Blue Mountain’s director of risk management and insurance, Nathan Haines.

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“I just want to be sure,” she said, explaining why she was asking Nate to review with her, yet again, the hospital’s professional liability coverage.

“No problem,” Nate said.

“We’ve got a $5 million self-insured retention and a $10 million excess tower on top of that,” Nate said.

“Which means what again?” Carley said.

“Let’s just say one of our doctors gets sued for medical malpractice and the jury finds against him for $1 million,” Nate said. “We’re self-insured for $5 million, we pay that $1 million out of our pockets.”

“Okay,” Carley said. “But what if …”

Nate knew where she was going.

“If we saw a loss of $6 million,” he said, finishing her thought, “which would be highly unusual, we’d pay $5 million out of pocket and the insurance company would pay $1 million,” Nate said.

“Why so much retention?” said Carley.

“Eh, it’s kind of a balancing act,” said Nate. “You’re trying to offset premium costs by taking some of the risk on.”

“I’d hate to be a risk manager,” Carley said to herself as she left the meeting with Nate.

———

When the “Baltimore 12” case went to trial, the full brunt of what Blue Mountain was facing became more evident.

It turned out that two deaths were linked to the hospital infection outbreak in Baltimore. One of the fatalities was David Brandt, the COO of a well-capitalized, up-and-coming tech firm with naval engineering connections based in Annapolis. Brandt had gone into the Baltimore hospital for knee surgery and hadn’t come out.

The other victim was Anna French, a striking attorney and mother of three who underwent an emergency appendectomy, acquired an infection and died a lingering, painful death.

The framed photographic portrait of a smiling Anna with her equally photogenic husband and children taken on the oak-leaf-speckled lawn of their family home in October was all the jury needs to see.

Three jury members, two of them male, wept openly. The pain and suffering amount decided on was in the tens of millions.

The lifetime income loss of the deceased COO came in at the very high end as well. Aggregate pain and suffering and loss of income determination from the juries in those two cases alone totaled $45 million.

Poll Question

Does your insurance program cover prior acts of the physician practices acquired by your group?

View Results

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Woulda’, Coulda’, Shoulda’

When Blue Mountain acquired the assets and liabilities of the Baltimore 12, trout fishing and sipping Cabernet Franc next to the fields it was grown in weren’t the only draws.

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To lure that talent, Blue Mountain had agreed to cover the physicians’ prior acts as part of their employment benefits.

Talking to Nathan Haines, Carley got yet another insurance lesson.

“We’ve got $20 million in liability in connection with these 12 hospitalists from Baltimore,” Nathan told Carley and the CFO, Fred Rutter, in a closed door meeting on a cold January morning.

“That’s pain and suffering, loss of income and attorneys’ fees,” Nathan said.

The room was silent for a minute.

“What about an appeal?” Fred said just to say something.

“From what the attorneys for the carrier tell us, that would be throwing good money after bad,” Nathan replied.

“Should I go on?”

“Sure,” Fred said.

“The physicians are covered under our limits,” Nathan said. “When we hired them, we didn’t negotiate the option that they have individual limits, so their liabilities hit our entire program,” Nathan said.

“Which means?” said Carley.

“Which means that we are looking at $10 million in uncovered liability, with the carrier picking up the other $10 million,” Nathan said.

———

In the months after that conversation, Blue Mountain Regional Medical Center went from an organization that was expanding and pervaded by a sense of optimism to an organization in retreat.

The aftermath of the “Baltimore 12” jury verdict was that Blue Mountain was going to have to scrap to find a professional liability insurance carrier for the coming year. It was also going to have to take an even higher retention than it had previously.

It was also looking at its additional newly acquired practices with a jaundiced eye.

Attempts to renegotiate professional liability indemnity arrangements after the fact were, to say the least, a point of contention with the doctors’ groups.

As she drove to work one morning the following May, Carley cast a doleful eye out the window to Lake Rita.

She would have liked to be jigging for crappies on the lake, instead of putting in her seventh straight 11-hour day.

The future of Blue Mountain Regional was highly uncertain, having looked so bright just a year or so ago.

“Maybe I should start looking for a job in Baltimore,” Carley said to herself as she drove into the parking lot at work.

Poll Question

Are you aware that you can establish individual liability limits for the physicians in your organization?

View Results

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Summary

A hospital group seeks to grow by attracting medical practices from around the Middle Atlantic region. But its plans backfire when its insurance coverage is misaligned with the professional liability exposures that some of the acquired physicians bring into the company.

1. Know what you are buying: The Blue Mountain Regional Medical Center erred by not fully understanding the professional liability risks carried by the physicians in the practices it was acquiring.

2. Tailor your coverage: As a hospital group looking to expand by acquiring regional practices, Blue Mountain needed to tailor its coverage to better mitigate potential professional liability risks that were being brought on board. Covering all prior acts with no individual limits was clearly not the way to go here.

3. Risk management needs to drive the bus: Blue Mountain clearly did not have risk management integrated into its acquisition and growth strategies. Risk management should have had more of a voice in what coverage physicians were being offered as a part of their benefits packages.

4. Know your legal venues: The risk to the hospital group in this scenario was compounded by the legal venue the professional liability was being adjudicated in. Professionals being brought in from a legal venue that has a reputation for outsized settlements should be examined with extra care.

5. Beware of the unknowns: The Affordable Care Act has placed health care risk management in flux like never before. Any growth or profit strategy that does not take this vast uncertainty into account is in all likelihood a flawed strategy.

Dan Reynolds is editor-in-chief of Risk & Insurance. He can be reached at dreynolds@lrp.com.
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Sponsored: Lexington Insurance

The Re-Invention of American Healthcare

Healthcare industry changes bring risks and opportunities.
By: | September 15, 2014 • 5 min read
SponsoredContent_Lex

Consolidation among healthcare providers continues at a torrid pace.

A multitude of factors are driving this consolidation, including the Affordable Care Act compliance, growing costs and the ever-greater complexity of health insurance reimbursements. After several years of purchasing individual practices and regional hospital systems, the emergence of the mega-hospital system is now clear.

“Every month, one of our clients is either being bought or buying someone — and the M&A activity shows no signs of slowing down,” said Brenda Osborne, executive vice president at Lexington Insurance Co.

This dramatic change in the landscape of healthcare providers is soon to be matched by equally significant changes in patient behavior. Motivated by growing out-of-pocket costs and empowered with new sources of information, the emergence of a “healthcare consumer” is on the horizon.

Price, service, reputation and, ultimately, value are soon to be important factors for patients making healthcare decisions.

Such significant changes bring with them new and challenging risks.

Physician integration

Although physicians traditionally started their own practices or joined medical groups, the current climate is quite the opposite. Doctors are now seeking out employment by health systems. Wages are guaranteed, hours are more stable, vacations are easier to take, and the burdens of running a business are gone.

“It’s a lot more of a desirable lifestyle, particularly for the younger generation,” said Osborne.

Brenda Osborne discusses the changing healthcare environment and the risks and opportunities to come.

Given the strategic importance of successfully integrating acquired practices into a larger healthcare system, hospitals are rightfully focused on how best to keep doctors happy, motivated and focused on patient safety.

A key issue that many hospitals struggle with is how to provide effective liability insurance for their doctors. Physicians who previously owned their practice are accustomed to a certain type of coverage and they expect that coverage to continue.

Even when operators find comparable liability insurance solutions for their doctors, getting buy-in from their staff is often an additional hurdle to overcome.

“Physicians listen to two things — physician leaders and data,” said Osborne. “That’s why Lexington provides assessments that utilize deep data analysis, combined with providing insights from leading doctors to help explain trends and best practices.

“In addition, utilizing benchmarks against peers helps to identify gaps in best practices. It’s a very powerful approach that speaks to doctors in a way that will help them improve their risk.”

Focusing on the “continuum of care”

There’s been a fundamental shift in how healthcare providers care for patients: Treatment is becoming more focused on a patient’s overall health status and related needs.

SponsoredContent_LexA cancer patient, for example, should have doctors in a number of specialties communicating and working together toward a positive patient outcome. But that means a change in thinking: Physicians need to work collaboratively with one another — not easy for individuals or groups that are used to being independent. Healthcare is a team sport.

“If there isn’t strong communication, strong leadership, and the recognition of proper treatment procedures between physicians, healthcare providers can increase the risk of error,” said Osborne. “The provider has got to treat the whole patient rather than each individual condition.”

That coordination must extend from inpatient to outpatient, especially since the ACA has led to a rapid increase in patients being treated at outpatient clinics, or via home health or telehealth to reduce the cost of inpatient care

“Home health is going be a growing area in the future,” Osborne continued. “Telehealth will become an effective and efficient way of managing and treating patients in their home. A patient might have a nurse come in and help the healthcare provider communicate with a physician through an iPad or computer. The nurse can also convey assessment findings to the physician.”

Metrics matter more than ever

Patients have not always thought of themselves as healthcare consumers, but that’s changing dramatically as they pay more out of pocket for their own healthcare. At the same time, there’s an increase in metrics and data available to the public — and healthcare consumers are drawing upon those metrics more and more when making choices that affect their health.

SponsoredContent_Lexington“Consumers are going to start measuring physicians against physicians, healthcare systems against healthcare systems. That competition will force everyone to improve the quality of care.”
– Brenda Osborne, Executive Vice President, Lexington Insurance

Think about all the research a consumer does before buying a car. Which dealership has the best price? Who provides the best service? Who’s offering the best financing deal?

“Do patients do that with physicians? No,” said Osborne. “Patients choose physicians through referrals from friends or health plans with minimal information. Patients may be putting their lives in the physicians’ hands and not know their track record.

That’s all going to change as patients’ use of data becomes more widespread. There are many web based resources to find information on physicians.

“Consumers are going to start measuring physicians against physicians, healthcare systems against healthcare systems,” said Osborne. “That competition will force everyone to improve the quality of care.”

Effective solutions are driven by expertise and vision

The rapidly evolving healthcare space requires all healthcare providers to find ways to cut costs and focus on patient safety. Lexington Insurance, long known as the leading innovative and nimble specialty insurer, is at the forefront in providing clients cutting-edge tools to help reduce costs and healthcare exposures.

These tools include:

  • Office Practice Risk Assessment: To support clients as they acquire physician practices, Lexington developed an office practice assessment tool which provides a broad, comprehensive evaluation of operational practices that may impact risk. The resulting report, complete with charts, graphs and insights, includes recommendations that can help physicians reduce risk related to such issues as telephone triage, lab results follow-up and medication management. .
  • Best Practice Assessments: High risk clinical areas such as emergency departments (ED) and obstetrics (OB) can benefit significantly from external, objective, evidence-based assessments to identify gaps and assure compliance with best practices. In addition to ED and OB, Lexington can provide a BPA for peri-operative care, prevention of healthcare-acquired infections, and nursing homes. All assessments result in a comprehensive report with recommendations for improvement and resources along with consultative assistance and support. .
  • Continuing Education: In an effort to improve knowledge, decrease potential risk and support healthcare providers in the use the most current tools and techniques, Lexington provides Continuing Medical Education credits at no cost to hospitals or their physicians.
  • Targeting the Healthcare Consumer: With Medicare reimbursement impacted by patient-satisfaction surveys, assuring a positive patient experience is more critical than ever. Lexington helps hospitals understand and improve the patient experience so they can continue to earn the trust of healthcare consumers while preserving their good reputation. .

To learn more about Lexington Insurance’s scope and depth of the patient safety consulting products and services healthcare solutions, interested brokers may visit their website.

This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with Lexington Insurance. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.

Lexington Insurance Company, an AIG Company, is the leading U.S.-based surplus lines insurer.
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