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It’s All About Content

Sleeker. Bolder. More responsive. In a word - immersive.

A more immersive reading experience? We’re glad you asked. A cleaner layout and typographic design keeps your focus on the content. The “infinite scroll,” simplified navigation and Google search make finding interesting articles easier. And no matter your screen size – PC, tablet or phone – the site is optimized to ensure the same great experience.

The benefits of the site are mostly self-evident. But a few features are worth highlighting to help get you started:

Article Pages

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Current Section: Displays the issue, topic, author or section you are currently viewing.

Content Ribbon: Lists all of the articles in the current section. Easily browse the articles and click on any tile to load that article into the infinite scroll.

Infinite Scroll: Read each article from top to bottom without having to click to continue. The next article loads automatically so you can continuously read/browse an entire issue or section – similar to how you read a print magazine.

Full Screen: Click the arrow to hide the content ribbon and create a clutter-free article reading experience. Also handy for smaller screens or tablets.

More Ways to Explore

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Nav Bar: Click the gray bar to reveal several filters, sections and topics that tailor articles to your interests. 

Authors/Topics: Reading an article you like? Click on the author’s name to see all of their content or click on one of the topics to load that section.

Google Search: Still not finding what you want? The search bar slides out to help you find it.

Responsive Design (Mobile Optimized) 

The site utilizes a responsive design. That means the layout automatically adjusts to different screen sizes. You can see the technology in action by adjusting the size of your browser window. It’s pretty cool.

But responsive design is more than just a neat trick. It ensures that our new site looks great and works well on all screen sizes. Call us a website or, if you like, a web app – the site combines the benefits of the free and open web with the elegance of an application.

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More to Come

But we are not done yet. The site enables us to integrate new content types into our stories. Over the next year, you will see more charts, graphs, infographics, videos, photos, etc. And an entirely new editorial program called “Risk Insider” is launching in April.

Be sure to sign-up for one of our newsletters to stay abreast of all these developments as well as the latest articles and content we publish.

In the meantime, we would love to hear your feedback about the new site or anything else we do. Write to us at riskletters@lrp.com.

Cover Story

Forged By Fire

Peter Eastwood and three trusted colleagues set out to build Berkshire Hathaway Specialty Insurance.
By: | December 1, 2013 • 9 min read
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To understand the professional bonds and temperaments of the team that leads Berkshire Hathaway Specialty Insurance, go back to 2008.

Peter Eastwood, president of BHSI since its April 29 launch, then worked at Lexington Insurance, AIG’s excess and surplus division. David Bresnahan, David Fields and Sanjay Godhwani, the three other players in the leadership quartet that left AIG for BHSI in April, were also AIG employees at the time. All of them had worked together on major projects and trusted one another. Then came September of 2008 and the earth shook in financial services.

We all know the story. AIG’s liquidity problems brought it to its knees. For many of its employees, the question became, should I stay or should I go?

These four stayed.

David Bresnahan, now an executive vice president, casualty, healthcare professional liability, executive and professional lines with BHSI, recalled that AIG’s property/casualty operation was financially sound at the time but was losing talent.

“Because of the parent company challenges and the possibility that people would start leaving the organization, there was the threat of a vicious spiral where people would leave and then customers would leave and lose confidence in the property/casualty businesses’ ability to move forward. And if the customers had left, that is the beginning of that downward spiral,” Bresnahan said.

David Bresnahan, executive vice president, casualty, healthcare professional liability, executive and professional lines, Berkshire Hathaway Specialty Insurance

“Those years that we spent together — between December of 2008 through 2011 — were when I learned some of the most important life lessons with respect to leadership and teamwork.”
– David Bresnahan, executive vice president, casualty, healthcare, professional liability, executive & professional lines, Berkshire Hathaway Specialty Insurance

Kevin Kelley, who had stood at the helm of Lexington for years, left the company in December of 2008 to take his present job as CEO of Ironshore.

Eastwood was then promoted to president and CEO of Lexington. It was, to that point in his career, the chance of a lifetime.

“It was an enormous opportunity for me and I recognized it for what it was. As a result of that event I have received more opportunity than I ever would have been given,” Eastwood said.

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But he and his colleagues who stayed at Lexington and AIG had to battle to save the company and its reputation. Looking back, Eastwood now sees that as his proudest moment at AIG.

“I think the thing that stands out the most is how my former colleagues and I came together at the height of the financial crisis to move together as a team to move the organization forward. Essentially to run to the fight, to stay with the organization,” Eastwood said.

“I stayed, and I think my colleagues stayed, out of a sense of loyalty to one another and to the organization, as well as based on a commitment we felt we had made to customers and other business partners. Many of us had worked for AIG for many, many years,” he said.

One can’t gauge an individual in just one meeting. But when Risk & Insurance® interviewed Eastwood in New York in early November, he came off as someone with a great deal of self-control, who chooses his words very carefully. One executive who watched Eastwood at work in the stressful days of late 2008 recalled him as one who kept his cool.

“Despite everything going on around him,” said James Drinkwater, president of the brokerage division for the AmWINS Group Inc., “he was always very calm and very thoughtful in his approach.

“He obviously took over at a very difficult time in Lexington’s history. He retained many of the key staff and I think he just demonstrated great leadership at that time,” he said.

Eastwood also marks late 2008 and beyond as a time that strengthened his bonds with Bresnahan, Fields and Godhwani.

The Team

As he looks at the team he is assembling now, that proven success in sticking together to help salvage AIG is in his hip pocket.

“I have said repeatedly to people that they are individuals who are just great professionals and equally good, if not better, human beings,” Eastwood said.

In Eastwood, Bresnahan and Fields said, they have a leader who leads by example, someone who holds himself to high standards and expects the same from teammates.

“He is one of the hardest working individuals you will meet. No matter how high he has climbed in particular organizations, I find that he really sweats the details and really gets into the weeds of the business,” said Bresnahan.

Bresnahan said that he too feels the time the four spent at AIG when it was reeling not only strengthened their bonds with one another but helped them grow as individuals.

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David Fields, executive vice president, underwriting, actuarial, finance and reinsurance at Berkshire Hathaway Specialty Insurance

“I agree with Peter,” Bresnahan said, “Those years that we spent together — between December of 2008 through 2011 — were when I learned some of the most important life lessons with respect to leadership and teamwork.

“And I share Peter’s view that it was one of the more rewarding times. It really revolved around teamwork, collaboration and being highly communicative to employees, customers and brokers. Those were some of the keys that got us through that very difficult time,” he said.

That experience and the way it strengthened existing bonds, instead of weakening them, is perhaps why this team at BHSI has as much faith as it does.

“It comes from having worked together in a variety of different situations and feeling that we had each other’s backs. We really feel comfortable with each other,” said Fields, now executive vice president, underwriting, actuarial, finance and reinsurance at BHSI.

Chance of a Lifetime

Being able to launch BHSI, backed as it is by the Berkshire Hathaway name and balance sheet, presents unique advantages.

“From my perspective, I smile every morning. I feel like I need to be able to pinch myself about is this all real,” said Fields.

“We are fortunate to be able to have the capital support and name recognition of the Berkshire organization; the freedom within the organization to focus on the things that are important and to be able to accomplish them quickly; and then the ability to work with people that we know and feel comfortable with.

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“We are creating an environment here that is completely different, in my opinion, than other places in the industry … it is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity,” he said.

Bresnahan said the response from customers so far has been glowing.

“When you meet with customers,
a lot of validation comes out of those meetings. There is genuine joy that people have seeing what we are doing and recognizing that we have a really special opportunity,” Bresnahan said.

“They have approached the marketplace in a very responsible fashion,” said AmWINS’ Drinkwater, “and I think that they have got a terrific team that is going to be incredibly successful in building a new company.”

On the one hand, BHSI has capital strength and a strong brand so it is not viewed as a new entrant, but on the other, it has the unique opportunity to build a team and systems from the ground up that are highly efficient and service-oriented.

R12-13p24-26_01Eastwood12-2.indd“The opportunity in and of itself is exciting. But the ability to build a company with people you respect, trust and have a very strong working relationship with is unique.”
– Sanjay Godhwani, executive vice president, property and programs, Berkshire Hathaway Specialty Insurance

“The opportunity in and of itself is exciting,” said Sanjay Godhwani, executive vice president, property and programs for BHSI. “But the ability to build a company with people you respect, trust and have a very strong working relationship with is unique.”

Since its launch, Eastwood said, BHSI has grown quickly and has been received enthusiastically by brokers and insureds. The possibilities are obviously enormous, but for Eastwood — who left a position as CEO and president of AIG property/casualty in the Americas for this unique opening — so too is the gravity with which it must be treated.

“It comes with a lot of opportunity and a lot of responsibility. The former of which I am thankful for, the latter of which I take very seriously. While the opportunity is significant for me, it is important for me to recognize the team and their contributions and the significance of this opportunity to them as well,” Eastwood said.

The Business So Far

BHSI was launched in April with Eastwood, Bresnahan, Fields and Godhwani. As of early November, the company had 73 employees and five business units, those being a property group, a casualty group, an executive professional lines group, a health care professional liability group and a program business group.

Coming out of the gate, Eastwood described BHSI as “disproportionately focused on the E&S market right now” for a number of reasons, “but evolving quickly.”

The reasons for the initial focus on E&S is that there is a good growth trajectory in E&S. It offers freedom of rate and form, and that makes it attractive for a firm looking to stand up businesses quickly, Eastwood said.

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Getting to work in admitted markets takes a little longer to set up, but Eastwood said BHSI is in the process of doing that. The directors’ and officers’ market, in particular, and the larger professional lines space is more of an admitted market.

“We have just completed a primary D&O policy form and we are now underway getting that policy form filed and the rates filed with it,” Eastwood said.

BHSI is, at this point, also a predominantly U.S.-focused business. The United States is by far the largest market in the world and it is where the Berkshire Hathaway infrastructure is “largely focused and built,” Eastwood said.

But BHSI does have an interest, he said, in moving the business outside of the United States and is exploring opportunities. That said, the company is writing U.S.-domiciled risk with foreign exposures.

In terms of distribution, Eastwood said his team is “interested in seeing as much of the marketplace as we can and as a result we are interested in seeing as much business from as many brokers as we can see it, because it is, again, the only way to see the totality of the market.”

Eastwood said the network will be both retail and wholesale-focused.

“I value the wholesale broker channel as a very effective distribution channel for us, reaching brokers that we couldn’t get to on our own or getting to geographic territories that we wouldn’t get to on our own,” he said.

As this venture unfolds, the excitement on the part of the BHSI executives is palpable and the possibilities before them look to be historic in their uniqueness.

Eastwood described this chance to build a business within Berkshire Hathaway as an opportunity to work within a company that has “industry leading characteristics.”

One, he said, Berkshire Hathaway is a company that knows and values the insurance industry. Its personal lines business Geico and its reinsurance arm Gen Re being just two examples.

Two, it has great financial strength.

“In a business where companies are transferring risk and we are assuming risk — it’s a competitive advantage,” Eastwood said.

The third is the brand of Berkshire Hathaway, standing as it does in Eastwood’s words, for “integrity and doing things the right way.”

And the fourth is group empowerment.

Eastwood said he has the right team to act with that freedom and deliver.

It’s fair to say that the rest of the industry is watching closely.

Dan Reynolds is editor-in-chief of Risk & Insurance. He can be reached at dreynolds@lrp.com.
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Sponsored: Healthcare Solutions

Achieving More Fluid Case Management

Four tenured claims management professionals convene in a roundtable discussion.
By: | June 2, 2014 • 6 min read
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Risk management practitioners point to a number of factors that influence the outcome of workers’ compensation claims. But readily identifiable factors shouldn’t necessarily be managed in a box.

To identify and discuss the changing issues influencing workers’ compensation claim outcomes, Risk & Insurance®, in partnership with Duluth, Ga.-based Healthcare Solutions, convened an April roundtable discussion in Philadelphia.

The discussion, moderated by Dan Reynolds, editor-in-chief of Risk & Insurance®, featured participation from four tenured claims management professionals.

This roundtable was ruled by a pragmatic tone, characterized by declarations on solutions that are finding traction on many current workers’ compensation challenges.

The advantages of face-to-face case management visits with injured workers got some of the strongest support at the roundtable.

“What you can assess from somebody’s home environment, their motivation, their attitude, their desire to get well or not get well is easy to do when you are looking at somebody and sitting in their home,” participant Barb Ritz said, a workers’ compensation manager in the office of risk services at the Temple University Health System in Philadelphia.

Telephonic case management gradually replaced face-to-face visits in many organizations, but participants said the pendulum has swung back and face-to-face visits are again more widely valued.

In person visits are beneficial not only in assessing the claimant’s condition and attitude, but also in providing an objective ear to annotate the dialogue between doctors and patients.

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“Oftentimes, injured workers who go to physician appointments only retain about 20 percent of what the doctor is telling them,” said Jean Chambers, a Lakeland, Fla.-based vice president of clinical services for Bunch CareSolutions. “When you have a nurse accompanying the claimant, the nurse can help educate the injured worker following the appointment and also provide an objective update to the employer on the injured worker’s condition related to the claim.”

“The relationship that the nurse develops with the claimant is very important,” added Christine Curtis, a manager of medical services in the workers’ compensation division of New Cumberland, Pa.-based School Claims Services.

“It’s also great for fraud detection. During a visit the nurse can see symptoms that don’t necessarily match actions, and oftentimes claimants will tell nurses things they shouldn’t if they want their claim to be accepted,” Curtis said.

For these reasons and others, Curtis said that she uses onsite nursing.

Roundtable participant Susan LaBar, a Yardley, Pa.-based risk manager for transportation company Coach USA, said when she first started her job there, she insisted that nurses be placed on all lost-time cases. But that didn’t happen until she convinced management that it would work.

“We did it and the indemnity dollars went down and it more than paid for the nurses,” she said. “That became our model. You have to prove that it works and that takes time, but it does come out at the end of the day,” she said.

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The ultimate outcome

Reducing costs is reason enough for implementing nurse case management, but many say safe return-to-work is the ultimate measure of a good outcome. An aging, heavier worker population plagued by diabetes, hypertension, and orthopedic problems and, in many cases, painkiller abuse is changing the very definition of safe return-to-work.

Roundtable members were unanimous in their belief that offering even the most undemanding forms of modified duty is preferable to having workers at home for extended periods of time.

“Return-to-work is the only way to control the workers’ comp cost. It’s the only way,” said Coach USA’s Susan LaBar.

Unhealthy households, family cultures in which workers’ compensation fraud can be a way of life and physical and mental atrophy are just some of the pitfalls that modified duty and return-to-work in general can help stave off.

“I take employees back in any capacity. So long as they can stand or sit or do something,” Ritz said. “The longer you’re sitting at home, the longer you’re disconnected. The next thing you know you’re isolated and angry with your employer.”

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“Return-to-work is the only way to control the workers’ comp cost. It’s the only way,” said Coach USA’s Susan LaBar.

Whose story is it?

Managing return-to-work and nurse supervision of workers’ compensation cases also play important roles in controlling communication around the case. Return-to-work and modified duty can more quickly break that negative communication chain, roundtable participants said.

There was some disagreement among participants in the area of fraud. Some felt that workers’ compensation fraud is not as prevalent as commonly believed.

On the other hand, Coach USA’s Susan LaBar said that many cases start out with a legitimate injury but become fraudulent through extension.

“I’m talking about a process where claimants drag out the claim, treatment continues and they never come back to work,” she said.

 

Social media, as in all aspects of insurance fraud, is also playing an important role. Roundtable participants said Facebook is the first place they visit when they get a claim. Unbridled posts of personal information have become a rich library for case managers looking for indications of fraud.

“What you can assess from somebody’s home environment, their motivation, their attitude, their desire to get well or not get well is easy to do when you are looking at somebody and sitting in their home,” said participant Barb Ritz.

As daunting as co-morbidities have become, roundtable participants said that data has become a useful tool. Information about tobacco use, weight, diabetes and other complicating factors is now being used by physicians and managed care vendors to educate patients and better manage treatment.

“Education is important after an injury occurs,” said Rich Leonardo, chief sales officer for Healthcare Solutions, who also sat in on the roundtable. “The nurse is not always delivering news the patient wants to hear, so providing education on how the process is going to work is helpful.”

“We’re trying to get people to ‘Know your number’, such as to know what your blood pressure and glucose levels are,” said SCS’s Christine Curtis. “If you have somebody who’s diabetic, hypertensive and overweight, that nurse can talk directly to the injured worker and say, ‘Look, I know this is a sensitive issue, but we want you to get better and we’ll work with you because improving your overall health is important to helping you recover.”

The costs of co-morbidities are pushing case managers to be more frank in patient dialogue. Information about smoking cessation programs and weight loss approaches is now more freely offered.

Managing constant change

Anyone responsible for workers’ compensation knows that medical costs have been rising for years. But medical cost is not the only factor in the case management equation that is in motion.

The pendulum swing between technology and the human touch in treating injured workers is ever in flux. Even within a single program, the decision on when it is best to apply nurse case management varies.

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“It used to be that every claim went to a nurse and now the industry is more selective,” said Bunch CareSolutions’ Jean Chambers. “However, you have to be careful because sometimes it’s the ones that seem to be a simple injury that can end up being a million dollar claim.”

“Predictive analytics can be used to help organizations flag claims for case management, but the human element will never be replaced,” Leonardo concluded.

This article was produced by Healthcare Solutions and not the Risk & Insurance® editorial team.


Healthcare Solutions serves as a health services company delivering integrated solutions to the property and casualty markets, specializing in workers’ compensation and auto liability/PIP.
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