It’s All About Content

Sleeker. Bolder. More responsive. In a word - immersive.

A more immersive reading experience? We’re glad you asked. A cleaner layout and typographic design keeps your focus on the content. The “infinite scroll,” simplified navigation and Google search make finding interesting articles easier. And no matter your screen size – PC, tablet or phone – the site is optimized to ensure the same great experience.

The benefits of the site are mostly self-evident. But a few features are worth highlighting to help get you started:

Article Pages

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Current Section: Displays the issue, topic, author or section you are currently viewing.

Content Ribbon: Lists all of the articles in the current section. Easily browse the articles and click on any tile to load that article into the infinite scroll.

Infinite Scroll: Read each article from top to bottom without having to click to continue. The next article loads automatically so you can continuously read/browse an entire issue or section – similar to how you read a print magazine.

Full Screen: Click the arrow to hide the content ribbon and create a clutter-free article reading experience. Also handy for smaller screens or tablets.

More Ways to Explore

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Nav Bar: Click the gray bar to reveal several filters, sections and topics that tailor articles to your interests. 

Authors/Topics: Reading an article you like? Click on the author’s name to see all of their content or click on one of the topics to load that section.

Google Search: Still not finding what you want? The search bar slides out to help you find it.

Responsive Design (Mobile Optimized) 

The site utilizes a responsive design. That means the layout automatically adjusts to different screen sizes. You can see the technology in action by adjusting the size of your browser window. It’s pretty cool.

But responsive design is more than just a neat trick. It ensures that our new site looks great and works well on all screen sizes. Call us a website or, if you like, a web app – the site combines the benefits of the free and open web with the elegance of an application.

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More to Come

But we are not done yet. The site enables us to integrate new content types into our stories. Over the next year, you will see more charts, graphs, infographics, videos, photos, etc.

Be sure to sign-up for one of our newsletters to stay abreast of all these developments as well as the latest articles and content we publish.

In the meantime, we would love to hear your feedback about the new site or anything else we do. Write to us at riskletters@lrp.com.

Risk Scenario

The Plague of Baltimore

A hospital group grows by acquiring medical talent. But growth comes with unanticipated risks.
By: | January 7, 2014 • 8 min read
Risk Scenarios are created by Risk & Insurance editors along with leading industry partners. The hypothetical, yet realistic stories, showcase emerging risks that can result in significant losses if not properly addressed.

Disclaimer: The events depicted in this scenario are fictitious. Any similarity to any corporation or person, living or dead, is merely coincidental.

A Disturbing Email

Carley Fitzpatrick flipped the line and the blueberry-colored, 7-inch, Texas-rigged rubber worm sank, almost motionless, next to the sunken tree that projected from the near bank of Lake Rita.

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She inhaled and exhaled deeply, balancing herself on the wooden seat of the canoe. Must be calm, she reminded herself, must be very calm and settled to do this right.

Carley looked away from her target, to where the sun was banking down below the green crest of trees on the ridge above the lake.

She twitched her rod tip once; paused for several seconds and then twitched it again. Then came the long, strong pull that signified a largemouth bass had sucked in the artificial worm.

She hooked him, netted him, took a brief admiring glance and put him back in the water unharmed.

Paddling back to her SUV, Carley remembered that she wanted to check back in with the office before going home. As the COO of Blue Mountain Regional Medical Center in York County, she was a key player in the hospital group’s expansion plans, putting in extra hours as it built itself into a larger system.

With the outdoorsy Central Pennsylvania lifestyle as a draw, Blue Mountain was successful in drawing talent from Washington, D.C., Philadelphia, Baltimore and Harrisburg. Making the switch from freeways and subways to the countryside dotted with horse farms and wineries was not that hard a sell.

With health care reform on the march, there were a number of smaller, more urban practices that were more than willing to have their assets and liabilities acquired by a hospital system. Health care reform just created too many uncertainties.

Back at the office, Carley opened a disturbing email from the office of Blue Mountain’s general counsel.

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Scenario Partner

The email said that 12 hospitalists in a Baltimore practice that Blue Mountain had acquired six months ago were now defendants in a class-action lawsuit stemming from a hospital-acquired infection outbreak at a Baltimore teaching hospital.

The outbreak had been dubbed “The Plague of Baltimore” by the local press.

“Sending this to you as an FYI, we’re not too concerned about it at this point,” Blue Mountain’s youngish general counsel had typed to Carley in the email.

“I’m not so sure that we shouldn’t be worried about it,” Carley said to herself under her breath as the sky outside her office window darkened into nightfall.

“Can you follow up with me on this or direct me to a copy of the lawsuit?” she wrote back to the general counsel.

Carley had been around long enough to know that Baltimore, along with some other East Coast cities like Philadelphia, fell into the category of  legal venue where judge and jury verdicts in personal injury cases could balloon far beyond what might be considered reasonable reparation.

The general counsel may have been good on paper at Dickinson Law, but he just might have a lot left to learn here in the real world.

Carley made a mental note to keep the “Baltimore 12” on her radar.

Poll Question

With the health care practices that you have acquired, how well versed are you on the prior acts exposures these physicians may carry with them?

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Look Back in Anguish

With the fate of the “Baltimore 12” never leaving her consciousness for long, Carley called a meeting with Blue Mountain’s director of risk management and insurance, Nathan Haines.

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“I just want to be sure,” she said, explaining why she was asking Nate to review with her, yet again, the hospital’s professional liability coverage.

“No problem,” Nate said.

“We’ve got a $5 million self-insured retention and a $10 million excess tower on top of that,” Nate said.

“Which means what again?” Carley said.

“Let’s just say one of our doctors gets sued for medical malpractice and the jury finds against him for $1 million,” Nate said. “We’re self-insured for $5 million, we pay that $1 million out of our pockets.”

“Okay,” Carley said. “But what if …”

Nate knew where she was going.

“If we saw a loss of $6 million,” he said, finishing her thought, “which would be highly unusual, we’d pay $5 million out of pocket and the insurance company would pay $1 million,” Nate said.

“Why so much retention?” said Carley.

“Eh, it’s kind of a balancing act,” said Nate. “You’re trying to offset premium costs by taking some of the risk on.”

“I’d hate to be a risk manager,” Carley said to herself as she left the meeting with Nate.

———

When the “Baltimore 12” case went to trial, the full brunt of what Blue Mountain was facing became more evident.

It turned out that two deaths were linked to the hospital infection outbreak in Baltimore. One of the fatalities was David Brandt, the COO of a well-capitalized, up-and-coming tech firm with naval engineering connections based in Annapolis. Brandt had gone into the Baltimore hospital for knee surgery and hadn’t come out.

The other victim was Anna French, a striking attorney and mother of three who underwent an emergency appendectomy, acquired an infection and died a lingering, painful death.

The framed photographic portrait of a smiling Anna with her equally photogenic husband and children taken on the oak-leaf-speckled lawn of their family home in October was all the jury needs to see.

Three jury members, two of them male, wept openly. The pain and suffering amount decided on was in the tens of millions.

The lifetime income loss of the deceased COO came in at the very high end as well. Aggregate pain and suffering and loss of income determination from the juries in those two cases alone totaled $45 million.

Poll Question

Does your insurance program cover prior acts of the physician practices acquired by your group?

View Results

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Woulda’, Coulda’, Shoulda’

When Blue Mountain acquired the assets and liabilities of the Baltimore 12, trout fishing and sipping Cabernet Franc next to the fields it was grown in weren’t the only draws.

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To lure that talent, Blue Mountain had agreed to cover the physicians’ prior acts as part of their employment benefits.

Talking to Nathan Haines, Carley got yet another insurance lesson.

“We’ve got $20 million in liability in connection with these 12 hospitalists from Baltimore,” Nathan told Carley and the CFO, Fred Rutter, in a closed door meeting on a cold January morning.

“That’s pain and suffering, loss of income and attorneys’ fees,” Nathan said.

The room was silent for a minute.

“What about an appeal?” Fred said just to say something.

“From what the attorneys for the carrier tell us, that would be throwing good money after bad,” Nathan replied.

“Should I go on?”

“Sure,” Fred said.

“The physicians are covered under our limits,” Nathan said. “When we hired them, we didn’t negotiate the option that they have individual limits, so their liabilities hit our entire program,” Nathan said.

“Which means?” said Carley.

“Which means that we are looking at $10 million in uncovered liability, with the carrier picking up the other $10 million,” Nathan said.

———

In the months after that conversation, Blue Mountain Regional Medical Center went from an organization that was expanding and pervaded by a sense of optimism to an organization in retreat.

The aftermath of the “Baltimore 12” jury verdict was that Blue Mountain was going to have to scrap to find a professional liability insurance carrier for the coming year. It was also going to have to take an even higher retention than it had previously.

It was also looking at its additional newly acquired practices with a jaundiced eye.

Attempts to renegotiate professional liability indemnity arrangements after the fact were, to say the least, a point of contention with the doctors’ groups.

As she drove to work one morning the following May, Carley cast a doleful eye out the window to Lake Rita.

She would have liked to be jigging for crappies on the lake, instead of putting in her seventh straight 11-hour day.

The future of Blue Mountain Regional was highly uncertain, having looked so bright just a year or so ago.

“Maybe I should start looking for a job in Baltimore,” Carley said to herself as she drove into the parking lot at work.

Poll Question

Are you aware that you can establish individual liability limits for the physicians in your organization?

View Results

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Summary

A hospital group seeks to grow by attracting medical practices from around the Middle Atlantic region. But its plans backfire when its insurance coverage is misaligned with the professional liability exposures that some of the acquired physicians bring into the company.

1. Know what you are buying: The Blue Mountain Regional Medical Center erred by not fully understanding the professional liability risks carried by the physicians in the practices it was acquiring.

2. Tailor your coverage: As a hospital group looking to expand by acquiring regional practices, Blue Mountain needed to tailor its coverage to better mitigate potential professional liability risks that were being brought on board. Covering all prior acts with no individual limits was clearly not the way to go here.

3. Risk management needs to drive the bus: Blue Mountain clearly did not have risk management integrated into its acquisition and growth strategies. Risk management should have had more of a voice in what coverage physicians were being offered as a part of their benefits packages.

4. Know your legal venues: The risk to the hospital group in this scenario was compounded by the legal venue the professional liability was being adjudicated in. Professionals being brought in from a legal venue that has a reputation for outsized settlements should be examined with extra care.

5. Beware of the unknowns: The Affordable Care Act has placed health care risk management in flux like never before. Any growth or profit strategy that does not take this vast uncertainty into account is in all likelihood a flawed strategy.

Dan Reynolds is editor-in-chief of Risk & Insurance. He can be reached at dreynolds@lrp.com.
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Sponsored: Aspen Insurance

A Modern Claims Philosophy: Proactive and Integrated

Aspen Insurance views the expertise and data of their claims professionals as a valuable asset.
By: | February 19, 2015 • 4 min read
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According to some experts, “The best claim is the one that never happens.”

But is that even remotely realistic?

Experienced risk professionals know that in the real world, claims and losses are inevitable. After all, it’s called Risk Management, not Risk Avoidance.

And while no one likes losses, there are rich lessons to be gleaned from the claims management process. Through careful tracking and analysis of losses, risk professionals spot gaps in their risk control programs and identify new or emerging risks.

Aspen Insurance embraces this philosophy by viewing the data and expertise of their claims operation as a valuable asset. Unlike more traditional carriers, Aspen Insurance integrates their claims professionals into all of their client work – from the initial risk assessment and underwriting process through ongoing risk management consulting and loss control.

This proactive and integrated approach results in meaningful reductions to the frequency and severity of client losses. But when the inevitable does happen, Aspen Insurance claims professionals utilize their established understanding of client risks and operations to produce some truly amazing solutions.

“I worked at several of the most well known and respected insurance companies in my many years as a claims executive. But few of them utilize an approach that is as innovative as Aspen Insurance,” said Stephen Perrella, senior vice president, casualty claims, at Aspen Insurance.

SponsoredContent_Aspen“We do a lot of trending and data analysis to provide as much information as possible to our clients. Our analytics can help clients improve upon their own risk management procedures.”
— Stephen Perrella, Senior Vice President, Casualty Claims, Aspen Insurance

Utilizing claims expertise to improve underwriting

Acting as adviser and advocate, Aspen integrates the entire process under a coverage coordinator who ensures that the underwriters, claims and insureds agree on consistent, clear definitions and protocols. With claims professionals involved in the initial account review and the development of form language, Aspen’s underwriters have a full sense of risks so they can provide more specific and meaningful coverage, and identify risks and exclusions that the underwriter might not consider during a routine underwriting process.

“Most insurers don’t ever want to talk about claims and underwriting in the same sentence,” said Perrella. “That archaic view can potentially hurt the insurance company as well as their business partners.”
SponsoredContent_AspenSponsoredContent_AspenAspen Insurance considered a company working on a large bridge refurbishment project on the West Coast as a potential insured, posing the array of generally anticipated construction-related risks. During underwriting, its claims managers discovered there was a large oil storage facility underneath the bridge. If a worker didn’t properly tether his or her tools, or a piece of steel fell onto a tank and fractured it, the consequences would be severe. Shutting down a widely used waterway channel for an oil cleanup would be devastating. The business interruption claims alone would be astronomical.

“We narrowed the opportunity for possible claims that the underwriter was unaware existed at the outset,” said Perrella.

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Risk management improved

Claims professionals help Aspen Insurance’s clients with their risk management programs. When data analysis reveals high numbers of claims in a particular area, Aspen readily shares that information with the client. The Aspen team then works with the client to determine if there are better ways to handle certain processes.

“We do a lot of trending and data analysis to provide as much information as possible to our clients,” said Perrella. “Our analytics can help clients improve upon their own risk management procedures.”
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SponsoredContent_AspenFor a large restaurant-and-entertainment group with locations in New York and Las Vegas, Aspen’s consultative approach has been critical. After meeting with risk managers and using analytics to study trends in the client’s portfolio, Aspen learned that the sheer size and volume of customers at each location led to disparate profiles of patron injuries.

Specifically, the organization had a high number of glass-related incidents across its multiple venues. So Aspen’s claims and underwriting professionals helped the organization implement new reporting protocols and risk-prevention strategies that led to a significant drop in glass-related claims over the following two years. Where one location would experience a disproportionate level of security assault or slip & fall claims, the possible genesis for those claims was discussed with the insured and corrective steps explored in response. Aspen’s proactive management of the account and working relationship with its principals led the organization to make changes that not only lowered the company’s exposures, but also kept patrons safer.

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World-class claims management

Despite expert planning and careful prevention, losses and claims are inevitable. With Aspen’s claims department involved from the earliest stages of risk assessment, the department has developed world-class claims-processing capability.

“When a claim does arrive, everyone knows exactly how to operate,” said Perrella. “By understanding the perspectives of both the underwriters and the actuaries, our claims folks have grown to be better business people.

“We have dramatically reduced the potential for any problematic communication breakdown between our claims team, broker and the client,” said Perrella.
SponsoredContent_AspenSponsoredContent_AspenA fire ripped through an office building rendering it unusable by its seven tenants. An investigation revealed that an employee of the client intentionally set the fire. The client had not purchased business interruption insurance, and instead only had coverage for the physical damage to the building.

The Aspen claims team researched a way to assist the client in filing a third-party claim through secondary insurance that covered the business interruption portion of the loss. The attention, knowledge and creativity of the claims team saved the client from possible insurmountable losses.

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Modernize your carrier relationship

Aspen Insurance’s claims philosophy is a great example of how this carrier’s innovative perspective is redefining the underwriter-client relationship. Learn more about how Aspen Insurance can benefit your risk management program at http://www.aspen.co/insurance/.

Stephen Perrella, Senior Vice President, Casualty, can be reached at Stephen.perrella@aspen-insurance.com.

This article is provided for news and information purposes only and does not necessarily represent Aspen’s views and does constitute legal advice. This article reflects the opinion of the author at the time it was written taking into account market, regulatory and other conditions at the time of writing which may change over time. Aspen does not undertake a duty to update the article.

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This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with Aspen Insurance. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.




Aspen Insurance is a business segment of Aspen Insurance Holdings Limited. It provides insurance for property, casualty, marine, energy and transportation, financial and professional lines, and programs business.
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