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Infographic: The Risk List

7 Emerging Technology Risks

Innovative technology presents unforeseen risk exposures. Presented by Travelers.
By: | August 26, 2014 • 1 min read
RiskList_August RiskList_August RiskList_August

The Risk List is presented by:


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The R&I Editorial Team may be reached at riskletters@lrp.com.
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Risk Insider: Susan LaBar

The High Cost of Fraud

By: | August 21, 2014 • 2 min read
Susan LaBar is the risk manager at Coach USA/Megabus. She has more than 20 years experience in handling nationwide liability and workers’ compensation claims. She can be reached at susan.labar@coachusa.com.

Workers’ compensation fraud is prevalent and is costing employers and insurance carriers significant dollars each year.

There are many degrees of fraud. There are blatantly false claims, such as someone faking a fall or accident, to more subtle examples, such as complaining of false or lingering pain to get more time off of work.

All forms of fraud cost money.  Recognizing fraudulent claims and controlling them can be difficult.  Below are two of the many ways that workers’ compensation fraud can be controlled.

Get the Facts

The initial investigation is the first step, and one of the most important in preventing and controlling fraud.  When an employee reports an injury, ensure that an accurate report is received.

Investigate every claim in detail.  No matter how minor the injury, it is important to complete a thorough investigation.

How many times has that “minor” claim turned into a large exposure?  An effective way to investigate is by interviewing the employee.  Question the employee about how exactly the incident happened, who witnessed it and what could be done to avoid it in the future.

Specifically ask them to name all body parts that were injured. One form of fraud is an attempt to add non-related injuries to the claim by expanding reported injuries to different body parts as time goes on.

Ask them questions about their life.  What are their hobbies, do they have other employment, and do they have a spouse and children?

These questions help document the accident and provide great information if there is a need to investigate the validity of the claim.  Having their version of the accident in writing makes it less likely that the facts will change.

Nurse Case Management

Nurse case management is useful in many ways to help ensure proper treatment, mitigate costs and return the worker to full duty. It is also a way to help manage situations where there is suspected claims fraud.

The nurse can observe and establish a relationship with the claimant.  The nurse should attend medical appointments with the injured worker and ensure the worker is being forthright with the doctor about their injury and job duties.

He/she should have a detailed job description so there is no question what restrictions the doctor should or shouldn’t place on the injured worker.  The nurse can present information to the doctor about the worker’s hobbies and lifestyle.

If investigation reveals that an employee is performing activities that he/she states they cannot do, the nurse can present this to the doctor in the hope of getting a full duty release.

There are numerous ways to reduce or prevent claims fraud.  Initial investigation and nurse case management are valuable tools.

While some fraudulent claims are prosecuted, most are not.  The evidence of fraud can be used to limit exposure of the claim.

Use the information to bring the worker back to full duty as soon as possible.  These tools can help shorten the length of a claim and save the company money.

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Sponsored Content by Riskonnect

A Dreaming Team

Chris Thorn of Southwest Airlines got creative with his risk management program. Now, the sky's the limit.
By: | September 15, 2014 • 4 min read
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Chris Thorn is known as one of the most creative risk managers in the business. After all, his risk management program hit the cover of Risk & Insurance® in March, 2012.

Now the senior manager, payments and risk, for Southwest Airlines is working with Riskonnect, a technology partner that he thinks can take his program to new heights.

“For us, it’s a platform that gives you so many different tools that if you can dream it, you can build it,” said Thorn.

Claims administration

Thorn ditched his legacy risk management information system in 2012 and started working with Riskonnect, initially using the platform solely for liability claims management.

But the system’s “do-it-yourself” accessibility almost immediately caught the eye of Thorn’s colleagues managing safety risk and workers’ compensation.

“They were seeking a software solution at the time and said, ‘Hey, we want to join the party,” Thorn recalls of his friends in safety and workers’ compensation.

SponsoredContent_Riskonnect“For us, it’s a platform that gives you so many different tools that if you can dream it, you can build it.”

–Chris Thorn, senior manager, payments and risk, Southwest Airlines

What was making Thorn’s colleagues so jealous was the system’s “smart question” process which allows any supervisor in the company to enter a claim, while at the same time freeing those supervisors from being claims adjusters.

The Riskonnect platform asks questions that direct the claim to the appropriate category without the supervisor having to take on the burden of performing that triage.

“They love it because all of the redundant questions are gone,” Thorn said.

The added beauty of the system, Thorn said, is that allows carriers and TPAs to work right alongside the Southwest team in claims files while maintaining rock-solid cyber security.

“This has sped up the process,” Thorn said.

“Any time you can speed up the process, the more success you’re going to have when you make offers to settle claims,” he said.

Policy management

Since that initial splash in claims management, the Riskonnect platform has gone on to become a rock star at Southwest in a number of other areas. And as Thorn suggests, the possibilities of the system are limited only by the user’s imagination.

SponsoredContent_RiskonnectWith a little creativity and help from Riskonnect as needed, a risk manager can add on system capabilities without having to go on bended knee to his own information technology department.

In the area of insurance policy management, for example, the Riskonnect platform as built by Thorn now holds data on all property values and exposures that can in turn be downloaded for use by underwriters.

Every time Southwest buys a new airplane, the enterprise platform sends out a notice to the airlines insurance broker, who in turn notifies the 16 or 17 carriers that are on the hull program.

Again, in that “anything’s possible” vein, the system has the capability of notifying the carriers, directly, a tool Thorn said he’s flirting with.

“It is capable of doing that,” he said.

“We’re testing out this functionality before we turn on it loose directly to the insurance companies.”

Carrier ratings

In alignment with the platform’s muscle in documenting, storing and reporting liability and property exposures, the system monitors and reports on insurance carrier financial strength.

If a rating agency downgrades a Southwest program carrier’s financial strength, for example, the system “pings” Thorn and his colleagues.

“Not only will we know about it, but we will also know all programs, present and past that they participated on, what the open reserves are for those policy years and policies,” Thorn said.

“That gives us even more comfort that we have good, solid financial backing of the insurance policies that are protecting us,” Thorn said.

Accounting interface

Like many of us, Chris Thorn didn’t set out to work in risk management and insurance. Thorn is a Certified Public Accountant, and it’s that background that allows him to take creative advantage of the Riskonnect platform’s malleability in yet another way.

With the help of the Riskonnect customer service team, Thorn added a function to the platform that allows him to calculate the cost of insurance policies on a monthly basis, enter them into a general ledger and send them over to his colleagues in accounting.

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“It’s very robust on handling financial information, date information, or anything with that much granularity,” Thorn said.

The sky is the limit

Thorn and Southwest are only two years into their relationship with Riskonnect and there are a number of places Thorn thinks the platform can take him that have yet to be explored, but certainly will be.

“It’s basically a repository of anything that’s risk-related, it continues to grow,” Thorn said.

SponsoredContent_Riskonnect“This has sped up the process. Any time you can speed up the process, the more success you’re going to have when you make offers to settle claims.”
–Chris Thorn, senior manager, payments and risk, Southwest Airlines

Not only have Southwest’s safety and workers’ compensation managers joined Thorn in his work with Riskonnect, business continuity has come knocking as well.

Thorn met in July with members of Southwest Airline’s business continuity team, which has a whole host of concerns, ranging from pandemics to cyber-attacks that it needs help in documenting the exposures and resiliency options for.

That Enterprise Risk Management approach will in the future also involve the system’s capability to provide risk alerts, telling Thorn and his team for example, that a hurricane or fast moving wildfire is threatening one of the company’s facilities.

Supply chain resiliency and managing certificates of insurance for foreign vendors are other areas where Thorn and his team plan to put the Riskonnect platform to good use.

“That’s all stuff that’s being worked on by us,” Thorn said.

“They’ve given us the tools, but we’re trying to develop how we’re going to use it,” he said.

This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with Riskonnect. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.


Riskonnect is the provider of a premier, enterprise-class technology platform for the risk management industry.
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