Infographic: The Risk List

6 Emerging Supply Chain Risks You Should Know

Risks to your supply chain can come from unexpected sources.
By: | May 5, 2014 • 2 min read

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Risk Insider: Joe Boren

The Wolf of RIMS

By: | May 5, 2014 • 2 min read
Joseph L. Boren is Chairman of the Environmental product line at Ironshore Holdings (U.S.) Inc., Executive Vice President of Ironshore Insurance Services, LLC, President of U.S. Field Operations and Director of Strategic Relations. He has experience in every segment of the environmental market; a regulator, practitioner, and insurer. Joe can be reached at joe.boren@ironshore.com.

RIMS just concluded in Denver, and I had a few observations.

It was cold, very cold. Given that the Spencer/Gallagher Golf Tournament is always a part of RIMS, why isn’t the conference held in cities with much better weather? Who could forget Chicago a few years ago, where the golf tournament lasted three holes because of the snow and those who chose Cubs opening day didn’t fare much better. I know we can never really guarantee the weather but we might want to increase the chances of a good climate for a great meeting. Eighteen holes of golf in the sun beats three holes in the cold any day.

And then there was the keynote speaker – Jordan Belfort, the author of “The Wolf of Wall Street.” I actually couldn’t believe RIMS would pick him to speak at our convention. Let’s see, his redeeming values were abusing drugs, denigrating women and maybe worst of all stealing money from at least 1,500 people. Nobody should have money stolen from them, but Belfort concentrated mostly on the weak and vulnerable, retirees or people just getting by. Nice guy, our motivational speaker.

So I was thinking, is this the best our industry could do for a keynote speaker? Was there a lesson RIMS wanted to teach, like “Greed is Bad”?

Of course, people deserve a second chance, so I did a little research after I learned Belfort was the keynote speaker. Nancy Dillon from the Daily News wrote, “according to Federal prosecutors, Belfort failed to live up to the restitution requirement of his 2003 sentencing agreement. The agreement requires him to pay 50 percent of his income towards the 1,500 clients he defrauded.” The Federal government filed a complaint since Belfort had an income of $1,767,203 in 2013 from his book/movie rights and another $24k from speaking engagements like the one at RIMS. Yet, According to Ben Child of the guardian.com he has only paid back $11.6 million of the $110.4 million he was ordered to pay as restitution.

For more details of just how rotten Belfort is, read this NY Times article by Joel M.Cohen who prosecuted the case.

So I was thinking, is this the best our industry could do for a keynote speaker? Was there a lesson RIMS wanted to teach, like “Greed is Bad”? Most of us saw Michael Douglas in Wall Street, some lived it. Couldn’t we as an industry have done better?

In the last year, I saw some great conference speakers such as Garrison Wynn, author of “The Real Truth About Success” as well as Lt. Col. Rob Waldman, a highly decorated fighter pilot, author and businessman and wonderful motivational speaker. And we got a guy who stole money from people and has yet to pay it back. Belfort would be a solid choice if we we motivating crooks, however I like to think a bit more highly of our community

Maybe Albert Einstein said it best when he said “the value of a man should be seen in what he gives and not in what he is able to receive.”

There are plenty of good, decent people who give back to society – why don’t we stick with them as our guest speakers!

Read all of Joe Boren’s Risk Insider contributions.

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Sponsored: Liberty International Underwriters

From Coast to Coast

Planning the Left Coast Lifter's complex voyage demands a specialized team of professionals.
By: | January 7, 2015 • 5 min read

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The 3,920-ton Left Coast Lifter, originally built by Fluor Construction to help build the new Bay Bridge in San Francisco, will be integral in rebuilding the Tappan Zee Bridge by 2018.

The Lifter and the Statue of Liberty

When he got the news, Scot Burford could see it as clearly as if somebody handed him an 8 by 11 color photograph.

On January 30,  the Left Coast Lifter, a massive crane originally built by Fluor Construction to help build the new Bay Bridge in San Francisco, steamed past the Statue of Liberty. Excited observers, who saw the crane entering New York Harbor, dubbed it the “The Hudson River Hoister,” honoring its new role in rebuilding the Tappan Zee Bridge over the Hudson River.

Powered by two stout-hearted tug boats, the Lauren Foss and the Iver Foss, it took more than five weeks for the huge crane to complete the 6,000 mile ocean journey from San Francisco to New York via the Panama Canal.

Scot took a deep breath and reflected on all the work needed to plan every aspect of the crane’s complicated journey.

A risk engineer at Liberty International Underwriters (LIU), Burford worked with a specialized team of marine insurance and risk management professionals which included John Phillips, LIU’s Hull Product Line Leader, Sean Dollahon, an LIU Marine underwriter, and Rick Falcinelli, LIU’s Marine Risk Engineering Manager, to complete a detailed analysis of the crane’s proposed route. Based on a multitude of factors, the LIU team confirmed the safety of the route, produced clear guidelines for the tug captains that included weather restrictions, predetermined ports of refuge in the case of bad weather as well as specifying the ballast conditions and rigging of tow gear on the tugs.

Of equal importance, the deep expertise and extensive experience of the LIU team ensured that the most knowledgeable local surveyors and tugboat captains with the best safety records were selected for the project. After all, the most careful of plans will only be as effective as the people who execute them.

The tremendous size of the Left Coast Lifter presented some unique challenges in preparing for its voyage.

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The original intention was to dry tow the crane by loading and securing it on a semi-submersible vessel. However, the lack of an American-flagged vessel that could accommodate the Left Coast Lifter created many logistical complexities and it was decided that the crane would be towed on its own barge.

At first, the LIU team was concerned since the barge was not intended for ocean travel and therefore lacked towing skegs and other structural components typically found on oceangoing barges.

But a detailed review of the plan with the client and contractors gave the LIU team confidence. In this instance, the sheer weight and size of the crane provided sufficient stability, and with the addition of a second tug on the barge’s stern, the LIU team, with its knowledge of barges and tugs, was confident the configuration was seaworthy and the barge would travel in a straight line. The team approved the plan and the crane began its successful voyage.

As impressive as the crane and its voyage were, it was just one piece in hundreds that needed to be underwritten and put in place for the Tappan Zee Bridge project to come off.

Time-Sensitive Quote

SponsoredContent_LIUThe rebuilding of the Tappan Zee Bridge, due to be completed in 2018, is the largest bridge construction project in the modern history of New York. The bridge is 3.1 miles long and will cost more than $3 billion to construct. The twin-span, cable-stayed bridge will be anchored to four mid-river towers.

When veteran contractors American Bridge, Fluor Corp., Granite Construction Northeast and Traylor Bros. formed a joint venture and won the contract to rebuild the Tappan Zee, one of the first things the consortium needed to do was find an insurance partner with the right coverages and technical expertise.

The Marsh broker, Ali Rizvi, Senior Vice President, working with the consortium, was well known to the LIU underwriting and engineering teams. In addition, Burford and the broker had worked on many projects in the past and had a strong relationship. These existing relationships were vital in facilitating efficient communication and data gathering, particularly given the scope and complexity of a project like the Tappan Zee.

And the scope of the project was indeed immense – more than 200 vessels, coming from all over the United States, would be moving construction equipment up the Hudson River.

An integrated team of LIU underwriters and risk engineers (including Burford, Phillips, Dollahon and Falcinelli) got to work evaluating the risk and the proper controls that the project required. Given the global scope of the project, the team’s ability to tap into their tight-knit global network of fellow LIU marine underwriters and engineers with deep industry relationships and expertise was invaluable.

In addition to the large number of vessels, the underwriting process was further complicated by many aspects of the project still being finalized.

“Because the consortium had just won this account, they were still working on contracts and contractors to finalize the deal and were unsure as to where most of the equipment and materials would be coming from,” Burford said.

Despite the massive size of the project and large number of stakeholders, LIU quickly turned around a quote involving three lines of marine coverage, Marine Liability, Project Cargo and Marine Hull & Machinery.

How could LIU produce such a complicated quote in a short period of time? It comes down to integrating risk engineers into the underwriting process, possessing deep industry experience on a global scale and having strong relationships that facilitate communication and trust.

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Photo Credit: New York State Thruway Authority

When completed in 2018, the Tappan Zee will be eight lanes, with four emergency pullover lanes. Commuters sailing across it in their sedans and SUVs might appreciate the view of the Hudson, but they might never grasp the complexity of insuring three marine lines, covering the movements of hundreds of marine vessels carrying very expensive cargo.

Not to mention ferrying a 3,920-ton crane from coast to coast without a hitch.

But that’s what insurance does, in its quiet profundity.

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This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with Liberty International Underwriters. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.




LIU is part of the Global Specialty Division of Liberty Mutual Insurance.
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