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6 Emerging Supply Chain Risks You Should Know

Risks to your supply chain can come from unexpected sources.
By: | May 5, 2014 • 2 min read

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Risk Insider: Joe Boren

The Wolf of RIMS

By: | May 5, 2014 • 2 min read
Joseph L. Boren is Chairman of the Environmental product line at Ironshore Holdings (U.S.) Inc., Executive Vice President of Ironshore Insurance Services, LLC, President of U.S. Field Operations and Director of Strategic Relations. He has experience in every segment of the environmental market; a regulator, practitioner, and insurer. Joe can be reached at [email protected]

RIMS just concluded in Denver, and I had a few observations.

It was cold, very cold. Given that the Spencer/Gallagher Golf Tournament is always a part of RIMS, why isn’t the conference held in cities with much better weather? Who could forget Chicago a few years ago, where the golf tournament lasted three holes because of the snow and those who chose Cubs opening day didn’t fare much better. I know we can never really guarantee the weather but we might want to increase the chances of a good climate for a great meeting. Eighteen holes of golf in the sun beats three holes in the cold any day.

And then there was the keynote speaker – Jordan Belfort, the author of “The Wolf of Wall Street.” I actually couldn’t believe RIMS would pick him to speak at our convention. Let’s see, his redeeming values were abusing drugs, denigrating women and maybe worst of all stealing money from at least 1,500 people. Nobody should have money stolen from them, but Belfort concentrated mostly on the weak and vulnerable, retirees or people just getting by. Nice guy, our motivational speaker.

So I was thinking, is this the best our industry could do for a keynote speaker? Was there a lesson RIMS wanted to teach, like “Greed is Bad”?

Of course, people deserve a second chance, so I did a little research after I learned Belfort was the keynote speaker. Nancy Dillon from the Daily News wrote, “according to Federal prosecutors, Belfort failed to live up to the restitution requirement of his 2003 sentencing agreement. The agreement requires him to pay 50 percent of his income towards the 1,500 clients he defrauded.” The Federal government filed a complaint since Belfort had an income of $1,767,203 in 2013 from his book/movie rights and another $24k from speaking engagements like the one at RIMS. Yet, According to Ben Child of the guardian.com he has only paid back $11.6 million of the $110.4 million he was ordered to pay as restitution.

For more details of just how rotten Belfort is, read this NY Times article by Joel M.Cohen who prosecuted the case.

So I was thinking, is this the best our industry could do for a keynote speaker? Was there a lesson RIMS wanted to teach, like “Greed is Bad”? Most of us saw Michael Douglas in Wall Street, some lived it. Couldn’t we as an industry have done better?

In the last year, I saw some great conference speakers such as Garrison Wynn, author of “The Real Truth About Success” as well as Lt. Col. Rob Waldman, a highly decorated fighter pilot, author and businessman and wonderful motivational speaker. And we got a guy who stole money from people and has yet to pay it back. Belfort would be a solid choice if we we motivating crooks, however I like to think a bit more highly of our community

Maybe Albert Einstein said it best when he said “the value of a man should be seen in what he gives and not in what he is able to receive.”

There are plenty of good, decent people who give back to society – why don’t we stick with them as our guest speakers!

Read all of Joe Boren’s Risk Insider contributions.

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Sponsored Content by Chubb

Electronic Waste Risks Piling Up

As new electronic devices replace older ones, electronic waste is piling up. Proper e-waste disposal poses complex environmental, regulatory and reputational challenges for risk managers.
By: | July 5, 2016 • 4 min read
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The latest electronic devices today may be obsolete by tomorrow. Outdated electronics pose a rapidly growing problem for risk managers. Telecommunications equipment, computers, printers, copiers, mobile devices and other electronics often contain toxic metals such as mercury and lead. Improper disposal of this electronic waste not only harms the environment, it can lead to heavy fines and reputation-damaging publicity.

Federal and state regulators are increasingly concerned about e-waste. Settlements in improper disposal cases have reached into the millions of dollars. Fines aren’t the only risk. Sensitive data inadvertently left on discarded equipment can lead to data breaches.

To avoid potentially serious claims and legal action, risk managers need to understand the risks of e-waste and to develop a strategy for recycling and disposal that complies with local, state and federal regulations.

The Risks Are Rising

E-waste has been piling up at a rate that’s two to three times faster than any other waste stream, according to U.S Environmental Protection Agency estimates. Any product that contains electronic circuitry can eventually become e-waste, and the range of products with embedded electronics grows every day. Because of the toxic materials involved, special care must be taken in disposing of unwanted equipment. Broken devices can leach hazardous materials into the ground and water, creating health risks on the site and neighboring properties.

Despite the environmental dangers, much of our outdated electronics still end up in landfills. Only about 40 percent of consumer electronics were recycled in 2013, according to the EPA. Yet for every million cellphones that are recycled, the EPA estimates that about 35,000 pounds of copper, 772 pounds of silver, 75 pounds of gold and 33 pounds of palladium can be recovered.

While consumers may bring unwanted electronics to local collection sites, corporations must comply with stringent guidelines. The waste must be disposed of properly using vendors with the requisite expertise, certifications and permits. The risk doesn’t end when e-waste is turned over to a disposal vendor. Liabilities for contamination can extend back from the disposal site to the company that discarded the equipment.

Reuse and Recycle

To cut down on e-waste, more companies are seeking to adapt older equipment for reuse. New products feature designs that make it easier to recycle materials and to remove heavy metals for reuse. These strategies conserve valuable resources, reduce the amount of waste and lessen the amount of new equipment that must be purchased.

Effective risk management should focus on minimizing waste, reusing and recycling electronics, managing disposal and complying with regulations at all levels.

For equipment that cannot be reused, companies should work with a disposal vendor that can make sure that their data is protected and that all the applicable environmental regulations are met. Vendors should present evidence of the required permits and certifications. Companies seeking disposal vendors may want to look for two voluntary certifications: the Responsible Recycling (R2) Standard, and the e-Stewards certification.

The U.S. EPA also provides guidance and technical support for firms seeking to implement best practices for e-waste. Under EPA rules for the disposal of items such as batteries, mercury-containing equipment and lamps, e-waste waste typically falls under the category of “universal waste.”

About half the states have enacted their own e-waste laws, and companies that do business in multiple states may have to comply with varying regulations that cover a wider list of materials. Some materials may require handling as hazardous waste according to federal, state and local requirements. U.S. businesses may also be subject to international treaties.

Developing E-Waste Strategies

Companies of all sizes and in all industries should implement e-waste strategies. Effective risk management should focus on minimizing waste, reusing and recycling electronics, managing disposal and complying with regulations at all levels. That’s a complex task that requires understanding which laws and treaties apply to a particular type of waste, keeping proper records and meeting permitting requirements. As part of their insurance program, companies may want to work with an insurer that offers auditing, training and other risk management services tailored for e-waste.

Insurance is an essential part of e-waste risk management. Premises pollution liability policies can provide coverage for environmental risks on a particular site, including remediation when necessary, as well as for exposures arising from transportation of e-waste and disposal at third-party sites. Companies may want to consider policies that provide coverage for their entire business operations, whether on their own premises or at third-party locations. Firms involved in e-waste management may want to consider contractor’s pollution liability coverage for environmental risks at project sites owned by other entities.

The growing challenges of managing e-waste are not only financial but also reputational. Companies that operate in a sustainable manner lower the risks of pollution and associated liabilities, avoid negative publicity stemming from missteps, while building reputations as responsible environmental stewards. Effective electronic waste management strategies help to protect the environment and the company.

This article is an annotated version of the new Chubb advisory, “Electronic Waste: Managing the Environmental and Regulatory Challenges.” To learn more about how to manage and prioritize e-waste risks, download the full advisory on the Chubb website.

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This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with Chubb. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.




With operations in 54 countries, Chubb provides commercial and personal property and casualty insurance, personal accident and supplemental health insurance, reinsurance and life insurance to a diverse group of clients.
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