Risk Insider: Jack Hampton

Cyber Risk: It’s Like Living on Mount Etna

By: | May 3, 2016 • 2 min read
Jack Hampton is a Professor of Business at St. Peter’s University in New Jersey and a former Executive Director of the Risk and Insurance Management Society (RIMS). He was named a Risk Innovator in 2008 by Risk and Insurance®. He can be reached at [email protected]

Everybody should have a favorite volcano and mine is Mount Etna in Sicily. A long time ago I became intrigued with the risk it poses for its neighbors.

Five distinct, active craters. A major eruption every two years throughout recorded history. Occasional destruction of entire villages.

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A Risk & Insurance® webinar on April 27, Maximizing ROI in Mitigating Cyber Risk conjured up a question. Is modern cyber risk the electronic equivalent of an active volcano? If yes, what do we do about living on it?

The webinar examined how organizations can maximize the return on investment from cyber risk mitigation. That is, how can we invest capital to achieve a specific financial goal?

The situation is straightforward. If we operate on Mount Etna, we will never control the volcano. We either get off or prepare for the year 1669 when an eruption wiped out parts of Catania and lava streams reached the Mediterranean Sea.

The sponsor was the Society of Actuaries. Thus, we could expect quantitative solutions to cyber problems. That was not what happened.

For starters, the speakers separated the information technology viewpoint from enterprise risk management. Organizations invest in computers and networks to earn a return on capital.

Time value of money paints the picture of the wisdom of the investment. This does not happen with cyber security decisions. The takeaway from the webinar was that quantitative tools are not at the level we need in an ERM context. In my view, they never will be.

The situation is straightforward. If we operate on Mount Etna, we will never control the volcano. We either get off or prepare for the year 1669 when an eruption wiped out parts of Catania and lava streams reached the Mediterranean Sea.

With cyber risk we are stuck about halfway up the mountain. We will be ducking lava flows for many years.

Where can we take refuge?

Business analytics can help understand the costs and opportunities of cyber risk mitigation. The webinar recommended The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) framework to help with cyber security decisions:

Identify. What are the things that are at risk? Include assets, data, computer systems and capabilities.

Protect. How do we safeguard those things? Include “hard” techniques like firewalls, encryption, and segregation. Do not forget “soft” approaches to reduce intentional or careless behaviors of employees, customers, vendors and authorized users.

Detect and Respond. Spend big money to hire people who could otherwise be wealthy beyond their wildest dreams if they took up hacking and avoided jail. Turn them loose to spot system weaknesses and block cyber security losses.

Recover. This may be the most important item on the NIST list. Assume the unexpected. Develop a contingency plan. Create a crisis team. Simulate an event. Assess your ability to restore assets, data, and capabilities. Spend the money to fix that which needs to be fixed.

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Now we go back to the return on investment. Measure it partly in financial terms with discounted cash flow techniques. Extend the analysis to incorporate the negative consequences of loss of markets, damage to reputation, and downgrading of stock value.

The common lesson of Mount Etna and cyber risk is that we cannot control the “mountain.” We should focus on our ability to survive an “eruption.”

This means we do not pursue the maximum return on investment. Instead, we should seek the maximum return on creating resilience after a cyber event.

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Vermont Report 2016

The Future Is Now

Mid-size employers transitioning from fully insured health care plans are intrigued by stop-loss captives.
By: | April 4, 2016 • 6 min read
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The relationship between captive insurance and health care is decades old. And it is very robust in the captive domicile of Vermont, which added seven health care captives in 2015 and now houses 96 health care captives overall.

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Now the domicile is poised to take advantage of its regulatory expertise to house medical stop-loss captives, for which some insurance professionals see a bright future.

One of them is Mark Tabler, executive director of Genesis Re, a segregated cell medical stop-loss captive, which redomesticated from Arizona to Vermont in 2015.
(Tabler also launched a separate medical professional liability risk retention group, Innovative Physician Solutions, of which he is COO.)

Tabler, the former president of the Arizona Captive Insurance Association, said he has found his calling.

“Once I got into the captive industry through this organization, it was just exciting,” he said. “I wouldn’t want to be in anything else.”

Stop-loss captives are, in essence, a type of reinsurance that kicks in to cover employee health care costs above a certain limit. And they have a number of advantages, according to Tabler.

Steve Gransbury, president, Accident & Health, QBE North America

Steve Gransbury, president, Accident & Health, QBE North America

That’s especially true of the one he operates, he said.

Genesis Re is owned by TPA and benefits company SIHO Insurance Services, which has its own book of business, as well as managing a large number of administrative services only (ASO) contracts, so the company has a good understanding of how to manage the health of large populations of people, Tabler said.

By setting up its own captive, it is able to apply that expertise to finance and control its exposures — and recoup any savings gained from loss control.

Steve Gransbury, president, accident and health for QBE North America, is another supporter of the captive stop-loss option.

The benefits of stop-loss captives are manifold, he said, but the primary ones are control and transparency.

“For a group captive, there is control in how to approach risk with economies of scale not available to mid-sized employers who don’t participate in a group captive,” he said.

“For a single-parent captive, there is control over financing or predictable risk internally versus the commercial market.”

Because captive premiums are treated as ordinary business expenses, he continued, there are incentives for “greater risk, claim and reserving control,” not to mention to keep underwriting profit and maintain stable prices.

Not Loved by All

Medical stop-loss captives aren’t without opposition though.

Some regulators perceive stop-loss captives as instruments for side-stepping the provisions of the Affordable Care Act.

State legislators in Minnesota and Rhode Island, for instance, considered putting floors on deductibles or increasing the attachment points for stop-loss captives — the dollar limit amount at which stop-loss would kick in above primary health insurance.

California passed a law that limited stop-loss captives to employers with 100 or more workers.

In July 2013, the captive regulator in Washington, D.C. took an even stronger stand. Dana Sheppard, associate commissioner of the district’s Department of Insurance, Securities and Banking, declared:

“Washington, D.C. is not in favor of allowing small employers located in D.C. to self-insure their health care risks, including the establishment of medical stop-loss captives, if their motivation for doing so would result in removing young and healthy persons from the exchange, leaving older and less healthy employees in the exchange.”

Tabler’s captive avoids these concerns by having a high attachment point at $500,000, too rich for small employers.

“A few years ago, groups who were exploring and ‘tire kicking’ are now doing business. Our large group/single parent captive business continues to be very robust.” — Steve Gransbury, president, accident and health for QBE North America.

Another obstacle to stop-loss captive success, however, is how many employers, whether big or small, are actually interested in participating in them.

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The experience of one captive, the Central Coast Community Mutual Insurance Co., is cautionary.

Formed in 2011 by the Community Hospital of the Monterey Peninsula (CHMP), the group stop-loss captive has since been trying to recruit members — unsuccessfully.

As hospital CFO Laura Zehm admitted, the parent company is at a do-or-die point in 2016; if they still haven’t brought on additional employers (it currently just involves the hospital’s and one other employer’s employee populations), they will consider giving it up.

“We had interest, for sure,” she said of other employers’ attitudes to the stop-loss captive over the past few years. “We do get calls.”

But eventually employers are dissuaded by brokers who promise to find them cheaper coverage elsewhere. It does not help the captive’s case that the commercial stop-loss insurance market is “really soft.”

The CHMP captive has so much to offer beyond just its coverages though. As part of the captive’s offering, members can tap into the hospital’s physician networks.

Laura Zehm, CFO, Community Hospital of the Monterey Peninsula

Laura Zehm, CFO, Community Hospital of the Monterey Peninsula

Zehm’s captive has its own TPA, which collects data from claims and then analyzes the information and applies it for better patient care.

For instance, through data, they can spot when a patient would benefit from six months of physical therapy before having to get his back or neck operated on. Or maybe never have that surgery.

For its all-in effort this year, Zehm said, the captive also made improvements. It partnered with the brokerage Alliant to gain the broker’s buy-side understanding. Zehm asked Alliant: If we don’t have anything worth selling, let us know.

Alliant didn’t reject them but instead offered ways to better the captives’ offerings.

Since then, the captive lowered costs within its physician network and incentivized physicians to keep member employees healthy.

“We continue to learn how to do this,” Zehm said. “We’re fixing everything that might be a barrier.”

High Interest in Stop-Loss Captives

While Zehm and Tabler provide an on-the-ground perspective of the benefits and challenges of stop-loss captives, the 30,000-foot perspective is one of optimism.

“While interest still remains very high, we’re actually seeing more deals get done over the last couple of years. In particular, with mid-sized employers that are looking at transitioning to self-insurance from fully insured health plans,” said QBE’s Gransbury.

“A few years ago, groups who were exploring and ‘tire kicking’ are now doing business. Our large group/single parent captive business continues to be very robust.”

Gransbury said that post-ACA and the removal of annual and lifetime benefit maximums, large employers are buying stop-loss coverage with unlimited reimbursement benefits and using existing single-parent captives to finance certain layers.

“A few years ago, groups who were exploring and ‘tire kicking’ are now doing business. Our large group/single parent captive business continues to be very robust.” — Steve Gransbury, president, Accident & Health, QBE North America

Then again, with every Republican presidential candidate since the beginning of the 2016 election season declaring that he or she would repeal the ACA if elected, perhaps the issue of how employers can best finance their employee health care benefits is far from moot.

It’s going on eight years that we have heard about uncertainty around health care, but Tabler said people are still waiting to see what will happen to the ACA before they feel totally settled and comfortable in their health care benefits arrangement.

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Whatever happens this November, employers can rest assured that Vermont will continue to be a home for health-care-related captives.

On the whole, captive insurance will continue to serve as an alternative and extremely innovative approach, whether it’s for professional liability, stop-loss coverage or another health care-related exposure. &

The R&I Editorial Team may be reached at [email protected]
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Sponsored Content by IPS

Compounding: Is it Coming of Age?

Prescription drug compounding is beginning to turn a corner in managing chronic pain.
By: | April 28, 2016 • 5 min read
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The WC managed care market has generally viewed the treatment method of Rx compounding through the lens of its negative impact to cost for treating chronic pain without examining fully the opportunity to utilize “best practice” prescription compounds to help combat the opioid epidemic this nation faces. IPS stands on the front lines of this opioid battle every day making a difference for its clients.  

After a shaky start cost-wise, prescription drug compounding is turning the corner in managing chronic pain without the risk of opioid addiction. A push from forward-thinking states and workers’ compensation PBMs who have the networks and resources to manage it is helping, too.

Prescription drug compounding has been around for more than a decade, but after a rocky start (primarily in terms of cost), compounding is finally coming into its own as an effective chronic pain management strategy – and a worthy alternative for costly and dangerous opioids – in workers’ compensation.

According to Greg Todd, CEO and founder of Integrated Prescription Solutions Inc. (IPS), a Costa Mesa, Calif.-based pharmacy benefit manager (PBM) for the workers’ compensation and disability market, one reason compounding is beginning to hit its stride is because some states have enacted laws to manage it more effectively. Another is PBMs like IPS have stepped up and are now managing compound drugs in a much more proactive manner from an oversight perspective.

By definition, compounding is a practice through which a licensed pharmacist or physician (or, in the case of an outsourcing facility, a person under the supervision of a licensed pharmacist) combines, mixes, or alters ingredients of a drug to create a medication tailored to the needs of an individual patient.

During that decade, Todd explains, opioids have filled the chronic pain management needs gap, bringing with them an enormous amount of problems as the ensuing addiction epidemic sweeping the nation resulted in the proliferation and over-consumption of opioids – at a staggering cost to both the bottom line and society at large.

As an alternative, compounded topical cream formulations also offer strong chronic pain management but have limited side effects and require much reduced dosage amounts to achieve effective tissue level penetration. In fact, they have a very low systemic absorption rate.

Bottom line, compounding provides prescribers with an excellent alternative treatment modality for chronic pain patients, both early and late stage, Todd says.

Time for Compounding Consideration

IPS_SponsoredContentThat scenario sets up the perfect argument for compounding, because for one thing, doctors are seeking a new solution, with all the pressure and scrutiny they’re receiving when trying to solve people’s chronic pain problems using opioids.

Todd explains the best news about neuropathic pain treatment using compounded topical analgesic creams is the results are outstanding, both in terms of patient satisfaction in VAS pain reduction but also in reduction potentially dangerous side effects of opioids.

The main issue with some of the early topical creams created via compounding was their high costs. In the early years, compounding, which does not require FDA approval, had little oversight or controls in place. But in the past few years, the workers compensation industry began to take notice of the solid science. At the same time, medical providers also were seeing the same science and began writing more prescriptions for compounding – which also offers them a revenue stream.

This is where oversight and rigor on the part of a PBM can make a difference, Todd says.

“You don’t let that compounded drug get dispensed when you’re going to pay for it without having a chance to approve it,” Todd says.

Education is Critical

IPS_SponsoredContentAt the same time, there is the growing, and genuine, need to start educating the doctors, helping them understand how they can really deliver quality pain management to a patient without gouging the system. A good compounding specialty pharmacy network offering tight, strict rules is fundamental, Todd says. And that means one that really reaches out to work with the doctors that are writing the prescriptions. The idea is to ensure that the active ingredients being chosen aren’t the most expensive sub-components because that unnecessarily will drive the cost of overall compound “through the ceiling.”

IPS has been able to mitigate costs in the last couple years just by having good common sense approach and a lot of physician outreach. Working with DermaTran Health Solutions and its national network of compounding pharmacies, IPS has been successfully impacting the cost while not reducing the effectiveness of a compounded prescription.

In Colorado, which has cracked down on compounding profiteering, Legislative change demanded no compound could be more than $350.00 period. What is notable, in an 18-month window for one client in Colorado, IPS had 38 compound prescriptions come through the door and each had between 4 and 7 active ingredients. Through its physician education efforts, IPS brought all 38 prescriptions down 3 active ingredients or less. IPS also helped patients achieve therapeutic success (and with medical community acceptance). In that case, the cost of compound prescriptions was down to an average of $350, versus the industry average of $788. Nationwide IPS has reduced the average cost of a compound prescription to $478.00.

Todd says. “We’ve still got a way to go, but we’ve made amazing progress in just the past couple of years on the cost and effective use of compound prescriptions.”

For more information on how you can better manage your costs for compound prescriptions, please call IPS at 866-846-9279.

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This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with IPS. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.




Integrated Prescription Solutions (IPS) is a Pharmacy Benefit Management (PBM) and Ancillary Services partner to W/C and Auto (PIP) Insurance carriers, Self Insured Employers, and Third Party Administrators who specialize in Workers Compensation benefits management.
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