Brokerage

The Fine Print

Wholesale and retail broker contracts must spell out roles, responsibilities and expectations.
By: | July 18, 2016 • 3 min read
Close-up Of Person's Hand Looking At Contract Through Magnifying Glass

When insurance buyers seek out hard-to-place risks — coastal property-catastrophe insurance in coastal Florida, for instance — they turn to a retail broker who in turn seeks coverage from a wholesale broker with access to surplus lines insurers or other specialty markets.

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Trouble may ensue, however, if the agreement between the retailer and wholesaler are unwritten or otherwise unclear. Too often, that is the case.

Mark Robinson, co-founder of national law firm, Michelman & Robinson, LLP, and chair of the firm’s insurance industry group, said that “it is alarmingly common for wholesale insurance brokers to not have formal written agreements in place with their retail producers, which exposes the wholesaler to potential liability.”

“While some of the key points that should be included in a written agreement are rather obvious — commission rates, payment of premiums, etc. — other essential terms such as the scope of binding authority, special cancellation provisions, and ownership of expirations can be much more nuanced, and should be spelled out in detail so as to mitigate the risk of conflicting interpretations,” he said.

Robinson noted that “it is critical that wholesaler/retailer agreements contain a mutual indemnification provision as a safeguard against third-party claims resulting from one party’s negligent acts, errors or omissions, or breach of duties under the agreement.”

Mark Robinson, co-founder, Michelman & Robinson, LLP

Mark Robinson, co-founder, Michelman & Robinson, LLP

In terms of commissions, for instance, “It’s pretty obvious [the rate should be spelled out], Robinson said, but contracts also need to spell out whether there is a right to change the commission rate paid to the retailer by the wholesaler at some stage.

Bernie Heinze, executive director of the American Association of Managing General Agents (AAMGA) in King of Prussia, Pa., agreed.

“In an age where lawsuits are quick to follow on the heels of many adverse coverage determinations, it is extremely important that these specific roles and responsibilities and expectations are specifically delineated, and it’s necessary that each party to the transaction understands their legal and contractual responsibilities,” said Heinze.

“It’s important to understand that it’s the carrier that has expressly conveyed and delegated its authority to bind risks in accordance with its underwriting guidelines and its risk appetite to the wholesaler, which serves the role of the defacto branch office of the insurer,” he said.

Bernd G. Heinze, executive director, American Association of Managing General Agents

Bernd G. Heinze, executive director, American Association of Managing General Agents

“In order to be in compliance with the statutory obligations of the insurer and its duties to the market,” he said, “the wholesaler has to be sure and the retailer similarly must be certain that the lines of demarcation between them have been established and understood.

“This would also include the issuance of certificates of insurance and endorsements to the policy, which are derived specifically from the authority the carrier has conveyed to the wholesaler,” Heinze said.

These certificates and endorsements can essentially change the coverage grants of the policy, Heinze noted.

Robinson said that “if the retailer thinks they have binding authority and represents to the risk manager, ‘This is bound. No worries,’ it could turn into a complicated legal issue.

“The agreement should expressly provide that the retail producer has no authority to bind, make, alter, vary, issue or discharge any insurance policy, extend the time for payment of premiums, waive or extend any policy obligation or condition, or incur any liability on behalf of the wholesaler or the insurers,” he said.

An attorney/consultant who has worked with insurance brokers for more than 25 years, and requested anonymity, said that in the 1980s, representatives of both retail and wholesale tried to address concerns over these sorts of agreements, with some organizations proposing a model contract.

Nothing came of the various initiatives, the attorney noted, due to the disparate nature of the wholesale universe, which includes small independents, national firms and boutiques.

Particularly problematic issues related to wholesale/retail broker contracts are commission, regulatory and licensing requirements, and the fulfillment of premium tax payment obligations.

Another area of complexity was that wholesale brokerage community agreements can vary widely between individual organizations, he said.

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Particularly problematic were commission, regulatory and licensing requirements, and the fulfillment of premium tax payment obligations, he said.

Some of these difficulties may have been eased or resolved by the passage of the Nonadmitted Reinsurance Reform Act in 2010, he said. The NRRA states that only one state, the home state of the insured, can regulate and tax a nonadmitted transaction.

That’s not to suggest that conflicts cannot still emerge if the correct contract language is not in place. Quite the contrary in fact, he said.

Janet Aschkenasy is a freelance financial writer based in New York. She can be reached at [email protected]
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Brokerage

Thoughtful Chemistry

The leaders of Willis Towers Watson discuss their hopes for the newly combined organization.
By: | May 24, 2016 • 5 min read
Lloyd`s of London

As they discuss their “merger of equals,” John Haley and Dominic Casserley emphasize a willingness to let the chemistry between their two legacy organizations develop naturally, rather than through top-down directives.

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Haley, CEO of the newly created Willis Towers Watson, and Casserley, the company’s deputy CEO and president, sat down with Risk & Insurance® at the RIMS convention in San Diego to talk about the progress of their company since the Willis/Towers Watson merger was completed in January.

The merger combined a benefits firm with a global large cap network — Towers Watson — with Willis, which had a strong large cap presence in commercial property/casualty insurance broking globally, but was best known as a middle market player in the United States.

“When Dominic and I were sitting down and talking about this, we thought the real prize is if we can create an environment where we have people working together and where we think of ourselves as an integrated firm,” said Haley, a Rutgers University mathematics major who rose up the ranks from the early roots of the Towers Watson organization in 1977.

John Haley, CEO, Willis Towers Watson

John Haley, CEO, Willis Towers Watson

Sure, the two leaders talk to their teams about their talent mix and the business opportunities the merger presents.

But since the firms merged in January, Haley and Casserley say they have been happy to let members of the two legacy firms reach out to one another, to start solving customer challenges together under their own steam and see how they gel as teammates.

He reiterated that point in a May 6 WTW earnings call with analysts.

“As I travel to the various offices and see firsthand the collaborative sales efforts and hear about our market success, it’s clear our colleagues are not waiting for a top-down integration mandate or reporting tools to go to market,” Haley said.

“We don’t know exactly what all the new capabilities, the new products and services are going to be,” Casserley said in San Diego in April.

“We do know that we are creating a unique organization, which is truly global and which is integrated as opposed to operating in silos,” said Casserley, a University of Cambridge graduate who before the Towers Watson marriage oversaw the completion of Willis’ acquisition of the large French brokerage Gras Savoye and its 3,900 colleagues at the end of 2015.

Willis bought its first stake in Gras Savoye back in 1995, taking a third of the French firm at that point in time.

The Relevance of Scale

Both men lead firms with a history of making big deals.

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Just to name a couple, Towers Watson was formed by the merger of Towers Perrin and Watson Wyatt back in 2010. Haley oversaw that merger.

A big part of the Willis middle market presence in the United States stems from its 2008 acquisition of Hilb, Rogal and Hobbs.

Scale comes into the Willis Towers Watson combination in a couple of ways.  Haley sees the fact that Towers Watson and Willis are coming together as two same-sized companies as an advantage.

“It is much easier to create a working environment when you have two roughly equal-sized firms than when you have one that is much larger than the other,” Haley said.

Pre-merger, according to company statements, Willis had more than 18,000 employees. Towers Watson had approximately 15,000.

Dominic Casserley, Deputy CEO and President, Willis Towers Watson

Dominic Casserley, Deputy CEO and President, Willis Towers Watson

Scale, as in bigger size, is also a consideration in the investment realm according to Casserley.

Among other responsibilities, Casserley oversees investment and reinsurance for WTW.

“The merger enables an uptick in client service and enables us to make some investments that might have been harder for us to do as separate firms,” Casserley said.

Although both Casserley and Haley have plenty of experience in acquisitions, and this is a busy time for M&A in general, Haley said Willis Towers Watson and its leaders are concentrating on clients and merging their cultures, rather than casting about for more acquisition targets, at least for now.

“For the first 12 to 18 months, it would have to be an exceptional opportunity,” said Haley.

“It would have to be unique and something that if we let it pass we would never have the chance again,” he said.

Opportunity Knocks

As it stands, the global reach of Towers Watson and its client list are a grand opportunity for Willis.

“One of the things we know is that if you don’t have the relationships ahead of time it is very difficult not to finish second,” Haley said.

“The merger enables an uptick in client service and enables us to make some investments that might have been harder for us to do as separate firms.” — Dominic Casserley, deputy CEO and president, Willis Towers Watson

On the other side, adding the legacy Willis expertise in property/casualty insurance broking gives legacy Towers Watson team members one more tool to bring into their conversations with clients.

“We have client relationship directors that are responsible for understanding their whole business strategy and for understanding the key people and for bringing together the appropriate subject matter experts. What we are doing now is we are adding one more subject matter expert,” Haley said.

“We are not asking them to do something new or fundamentally different from what they’ve done before.”

“The grand prize is having our folks work together across lines and work cooperatively with clients to identify and solve those problems.” — John Haley, CEO, Willis Towers Watson

Casserley stressed that the fact that Willis can now take advantage of Towers Watson’s large cap relationships doesn’t mean that Willis is turning away from its strength or its relationships in the middle market.

“This is not a pivot,” Casserley said.

The merger also allows the benefits-focused legacy Towers Watson employees to bring yet another tool to their clients, the insurance expertise of the legacy Willis employees.

“We don’t know what the solutions we come up with will be,” Haley said.

“But we do know that the human side and the risk side are related. We think they are not only related today but they are going to be increasingly related in the future.

“The grand prize is having our folks work together across lines and work cooperatively with clients to identify and solve those problems.”

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Casserley said how the Willis Towers Watson colleagues find those solutions as part of a new, integrated platform is an exciting unknown.

“It may well be applying property and casualty techniques to a benefits problem and vice versa,” he said.

“Or it might be applying an actuarial analysis to a property/casualty risk in a way that hasn’t been done before. You won’t know that until you see the teams literally intertwined,” he said.

Dan Reynolds is editor-in-chief of Risk & Insurance. He can be reached at [email protected]
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Electronic Waste Risks Piling Up

As new electronic devices replace older ones, electronic waste is piling up. Proper e-waste disposal poses complex environmental, regulatory and reputational challenges for risk managers.
By: | July 5, 2016 • 4 min read
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The latest electronic devices today may be obsolete by tomorrow. Outdated electronics pose a rapidly growing problem for risk managers. Telecommunications equipment, computers, printers, copiers, mobile devices and other electronics often contain toxic metals such as mercury and lead. Improper disposal of this electronic waste not only harms the environment, it can lead to heavy fines and reputation-damaging publicity.

Federal and state regulators are increasingly concerned about e-waste. Settlements in improper disposal cases have reached into the millions of dollars. Fines aren’t the only risk. Sensitive data inadvertently left on discarded equipment can lead to data breaches.

To avoid potentially serious claims and legal action, risk managers need to understand the risks of e-waste and to develop a strategy for recycling and disposal that complies with local, state and federal regulations.

The Risks Are Rising

E-waste has been piling up at a rate that’s two to three times faster than any other waste stream, according to U.S Environmental Protection Agency estimates. Any product that contains electronic circuitry can eventually become e-waste, and the range of products with embedded electronics grows every day. Because of the toxic materials involved, special care must be taken in disposing of unwanted equipment. Broken devices can leach hazardous materials into the ground and water, creating health risks on the site and neighboring properties.

Despite the environmental dangers, much of our outdated electronics still end up in landfills. Only about 40 percent of consumer electronics were recycled in 2013, according to the EPA. Yet for every million cellphones that are recycled, the EPA estimates that about 35,000 pounds of copper, 772 pounds of silver, 75 pounds of gold and 33 pounds of palladium can be recovered.

While consumers may bring unwanted electronics to local collection sites, corporations must comply with stringent guidelines. The waste must be disposed of properly using vendors with the requisite expertise, certifications and permits. The risk doesn’t end when e-waste is turned over to a disposal vendor. Liabilities for contamination can extend back from the disposal site to the company that discarded the equipment.

Reuse and Recycle

To cut down on e-waste, more companies are seeking to adapt older equipment for reuse. New products feature designs that make it easier to recycle materials and to remove heavy metals for reuse. These strategies conserve valuable resources, reduce the amount of waste and lessen the amount of new equipment that must be purchased.

Effective risk management should focus on minimizing waste, reusing and recycling electronics, managing disposal and complying with regulations at all levels.

For equipment that cannot be reused, companies should work with a disposal vendor that can make sure that their data is protected and that all the applicable environmental regulations are met. Vendors should present evidence of the required permits and certifications. Companies seeking disposal vendors may want to look for two voluntary certifications: the Responsible Recycling (R2) Standard, and the e-Stewards certification.

The U.S. EPA also provides guidance and technical support for firms seeking to implement best practices for e-waste. Under EPA rules for the disposal of items such as batteries, mercury-containing equipment and lamps, e-waste waste typically falls under the category of “universal waste.”

About half the states have enacted their own e-waste laws, and companies that do business in multiple states may have to comply with varying regulations that cover a wider list of materials. Some materials may require handling as hazardous waste according to federal, state and local requirements. U.S. businesses may also be subject to international treaties.

Developing E-Waste Strategies

Companies of all sizes and in all industries should implement e-waste strategies. Effective risk management should focus on minimizing waste, reusing and recycling electronics, managing disposal and complying with regulations at all levels. That’s a complex task that requires understanding which laws and treaties apply to a particular type of waste, keeping proper records and meeting permitting requirements. As part of their insurance program, companies may want to work with an insurer that offers auditing, training and other risk management services tailored for e-waste.

Insurance is an essential part of e-waste risk management. Premises pollution liability policies can provide coverage for environmental risks on a particular site, including remediation when necessary, as well as for exposures arising from transportation of e-waste and disposal at third-party sites. Companies may want to consider policies that provide coverage for their entire business operations, whether on their own premises or at third-party locations. Firms involved in e-waste management may want to consider contractor’s pollution liability coverage for environmental risks at project sites owned by other entities.

The growing challenges of managing e-waste are not only financial but also reputational. Companies that operate in a sustainable manner lower the risks of pollution and associated liabilities, avoid negative publicity stemming from missteps, while building reputations as responsible environmental stewards. Effective electronic waste management strategies help to protect the environment and the company.

This article is an annotated version of the new Chubb advisory, “Electronic Waste: Managing the Environmental and Regulatory Challenges.” To learn more about how to manage and prioritize e-waste risks, download the full advisory on the Chubb website.

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This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with Chubb. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.




With operations in 54 countries, Chubb provides commercial and personal property and casualty insurance, personal accident and supplemental health insurance, reinsurance and life insurance to a diverse group of clients.
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