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P/C Pricing

P/C Rate Outlook

Marsh: P/C rates to remain competitive this year — with some exceptions.
By: | April 23, 2014 • 3 min read
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From a risk perspective, 2014 will be characterized by competitive property rates, a hard market for marine risks, and continued challenges in the terrorism-risk space, according to Marsh executives.

During 2013, the U.S. property/casualty insurance market benefited from lower catastrophe losses, an influx of new capacity, and four quarters of profitable underwriting results, said Dean Klisura, Marsh’s U.S. Risk Practices and Specialties leader, during a webinar on Jan. 29.

While today’s low-interest rate environment remains a challenge for insurers, the P&C market is essentially one of “abundant capacity and competitive terms and pricing,” said Klisura.

With some exceptions, risk purchasers will see 2013’s competitive rates and policy terms continue into 2014, Marsh officials agreed.

For example, Klisura said, surplus capacity among insurers and reinsurers alike kept pricing relatively stable for property risks, even in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy, in the third quarter of 2012.

“Property insurance pricing has generally increased after a major catastrophe such as Hurricanes Katrina and Ike,” he said. Following Hurricane Sandy, however, only those with flood zone exposures or organizations in local areas directly impacted by Sandy saw rates increase significantly.

Moreover, in the reinsurance space, Jan. 1, 2014 treaty renewals saw average rates “fall significantly across nearly all regions and business segments” due to low loss experience and the influx of “billions” of dollars in new capital of late, he added.

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Nevertheless, there will be challenges this year for catastrophe-exposed risks with flood zone exposures, as well as for those with large transportation fleets or rail exposures, according to Marsh.

Another challenge may be terrorism coverage, which will undoubtedly be in short supply if Congress does not reauthorize the Terrorism Risk Insurance Reauthorization Act (TRIPRA), said Duncan Ellis, Marsh’s U.S. Property Practice leader.

The private insurance market is unlikely to be an adequate substitute to the federal program, he said, suggesting price increases and property shortages if the federal reinsurance program — first instituted as a response to September 11, 2001 attacks — is not extended.

“As they address the uncertainty of TRIPRA, organizations may consider alternative solutions for terrorism coverage, including stand-alone terrorism placements, reservation of capacity, sunset provision discussions, and captive insurer strategies,” Ellis told Risk & Insurance®.

There are several areas risk managers should keep an eye on, Marsh leaders said:

  • Auto liability, where insurers may call for larger attachment points this year.
  • Marine liability, where the market hardened in 2013, and will likely continue that trend this year, with 5 percent to 20 percent premium increases for insureds with good loss histories.
  • Limited capacity for property insurers in catastrophe-prone regions. Property rates began to trend downward second part of 2013. While that should continue into 2014, those with insured values concentrated in catastrophe-prone areas could see rates that are flat to 10 percent higher going forward.
  • Those with windstorm exposures located in the Southeastern or inland Texas and mid-Atlantic United States will want to remodel their risks this year to incorporate the impact of Risk Management Solutions’ newest version 13 model.

Finally, whereas most casualty lines should see only low-single digit increases this year, according to Steve Kempsey, Marsh’s U.S. Casualty leader, workers compensation remains a difficult risk for some.

Fortunately, however, many organizations are apparently serious about keeping medical costs in check.

Nearly two-thirds (63 percent) of 200 or so webinar participants said their organization “regularly monitors the programs used for medical cost management (such as bill review, nurse case management, and utilization review) in order to assess return on investment.”

Three in10 said they felt they did a good job monitoring returns, and one-third said they were doing some monitoring, but could still do a better job.

Janet Aschkenasy is a freelance financial writer based in New York. She can be reached at riskletters@lrp.com.
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Aviation Woes

Coping with Cancellations

Could a weather-related insurance solution be designed to help airlines cope with cancellation losses?
By: | April 23, 2014 • 4 min read
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Airlines typically can offset revenue losses for cancellations due to bad weather either by saving on fuel and salary costs or rerouting passengers on other flights, but this year’s revenue losses from the worst winter storm season in years might be too much for traditional measures.

At least one broker said the time may be right for airlines to consider crafting custom insurance programs to account for such devastating seasons.

For a good part of the country, including many parts of the Southeast, snow and ice storms have wreaked havoc on flight cancellations, with a mid-February storm being the worst of all. On Feb. 13, a snowstorm from Virginia to Maine caused airlines to scrub 7,561 U.S. flights, more than the 7,400 cancelled flights due to Hurricane Sandy, according to MasFlight, industry data tracker based in Bethesda, Md.

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Roughly 100,000 flights have been canceled since Dec. 1, MasFlight said.

Just United, alone, the world’s second-largest airline, reported that it had cancelled 22,500 flights in January and February, 2014, according to Bloomberg. The airline’s completed regional flights was 87.1 percent, which was “an extraordinarily low level,” and almost 9 percentage points below its mainline operations, it reported.

And another potentially heavy snowfall was forecast for last weekend, from California to New England.

The sheer amount of cancellations this winter are likely straining airlines’ bottom lines, said Katie Connell, a spokeswoman for Airlines for America, a trade group for major U.S. airline companies.

“The airline industry’s fixed costs are high, therefore the majority of operating costs will still be incurred by airlines, even for canceled flights,” Connell wrote in an email. “If a flight is canceled due to weather, the only significant cost that the airline avoids is fuel; otherwise, it must still pay ownership costs for aircraft and ground equipment, maintenance costs and overhead and most crew costs. Extended storms and other sources of irregular operations are clear reminders of the industry’s operational and financial vulnerability to factors outside its control.”

Bob Mann, an independent airline analyst and consultant who is principal of R.W. Mann & Co. Inc. in Port Washington, N.Y., said that two-thirds of costs — fuel and labor — are short-term variable costs, but that fixed charges are “unfortunately incurred.” Airlines just typically absorb those costs.

“I am not aware of any airline that has considered taking out business interruption insurance for weather-related disruptions; it is simply a part of the business,” Mann said.

Chuck Cederroth, managing director at Aon Risk Solutions’ aviation practice, said carriers would probably not want to insure airlines against cancellations because airlines have control over whether a flight will be canceled, particularly if they don’t want to risk being fined up to $27,500 for each passenger by the Federal Aviation Administration when passengers are stuck on a tarmac for hours.

“How could an insurance product work when the insured is the one who controls the trigger?” Cederroth asked. “I think it would be a product that insurance companies would probably have a hard time providing.”

But Brad Meinhardt, U.S. aviation practice leader, for Arthur J. Gallagher & Co., said now may be the best time for airlines — and insurance carriers — to think about crafting a specialized insurance program to cover fluke years like this one.

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“I would be stunned if this subject hasn’t made its way up into the C-suites of major and mid-sized airlines,” Meinhardt said. “When these events happen, people tend to look over their shoulder and ask if there is a solution for such events.”

Airlines often hedge losses from unknown variables such as varying fuel costs or interest rate fluctuations using derivatives, but those tools may not be enough for severe winters such as this year’s, he said. While products like business interruption insurance may not be used for airlines, they could look at weather-related insurance products that have very specific triggers.

For example, airlines could designate a period of time for such a “tough winter policy,” say from the period of November to March, in which they can manage cancellations due to 10 days of heavy snowfall, Meinhardt said. That amount could be designated their retention in such a policy, and anything in excess of the designated snowfall days could be a defined benefit that a carrier could pay if the policy is triggered. Possibly, the trigger would be inches of snowfall. “Custom solutions are the idea,” he said.

“Airlines are not likely buying any of these types of products now, but I think there’s probably some thinking along those lines right now as many might have to take losses as write-downs on their quarterly earnings and hope this doesn’t happen again,” he said. “There probably needs to be one airline making a trailblazing action on an insurance or derivative product — something that gets people talking about how to hedge against those losses in the future.”

Katie Kuehner-Hebert is a freelance writer based in California. She has more than two decades of journalism experience and expertise in financial writing. She can be reached at riskletters@lrp.com.
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Sponsored Content by Riskonnect

Passionate About Technology

Brit Waters and his team revolutionized Avery Dennison's risk management process. Now other departments are looking to follow suit.
By: | April 7, 2014 • 5 min read
SponsoredContent_Riskonnect

If you overheard the passion and enthusiasm that Brit Waters uses to describe his most important business technology, you would immediately assume it was the latest smartphone or tablet. But it’s not Apple or Google that generates so much enthusiasm, it’s the Riskonnect risk management platform.

“Riskonnect revolutionized how our department does business. This system changed the way we gather, analyze and communicate information. It’s made us more efficient, effective and reliable,” said Waters, Manager, Risk Management at Avery Dennison Corporation. “These are not bandages, but complete solutions.”

Avery Dennison is a multinational company offering labeling and packaging materials and solutions whose applications and technologies are an integral part of products used in every major market and industry. The company operates in more than 50 countries with over 26,000 employees and $6 billion in revenues in 2013.

SponsoredContent_Riskonnect“Riskonnect revolutionized how our department does business. This system changed the way we gather, analyze and communicate information. It’s made us more efficient, effective and reliable. These are not bandages, but complete solutions.”
– Brit Waters, Manager, Risk Management, Avery Dennison Corporation

The company partnered with Riskonnect, the provider of premier, enterprise-class technology platforms. In just 18 months, the system not only revolutionized the department but also delivered wide-ranging value for plenty of other parts of the organization. Those departments utilize the system to manage financial assets, keep track of vehicles and will soon oversee facilities requests.

‘The Simplicity is Unreal’

For global property insurance renewals, Riskonnect changed the way Avery Dennison collects data on its 300 manufacturing facilities, warehouses and other properties around the world. Gone are the days of sorting through hundreds of separate emails with information about the properties and merging hundreds of separate spreadsheets into one.

Not only was the old process cumbersome, it left lots of room for error.

With Riskonnect, the process is automated. It sends emails to the more than 100 individual contacts and the users insert the information into the Riskonnect portal themselves — something that makes Waters’ life a whole lot easier.

“I hit a button once and it runs the report for me. The simplicity is unreal,” he said. “Plus, it gives us better information that we can communicate to our insurance carriers, and gives them increased confidence about the risks they’re insuring.”

Waters said it’s a big time-saver. “Before, the process could take up to three months, and now we get it done in less than a month.”

One thing he’s particularly excited about is the configurability of the portal. If he wants to customize it, he can easily do so without going through a computer programmer or contacting an account executive.

“It gives you the power to set up the system as you need it, not as someone else envisions you need it,” said Waters.

Expediting Claims

The Riskonnect portal is also the primary source for reporting workers’ compensation claims. Again, the Riskonnect system simplified the process. Before, employees had to call a 1-800 number or fill out a long form and fax it to the Third Party Claims Administrator (TPA). Now they just log on and use the claims reporting portal, which is equipped with drop-down menus and other efficiencies that help expedite the process.

“We take the guessing game out of their hands,” said Waters. “In a matter of minutes, they get a confirmation email that the claim has been submitted to the TPA.”

Through the Riskonnect dashboard tools, Waters and his department can learn a lot about trends in workers’ comp claims. The system tracks claims year-to-date, costs, causes of injury and even the top body parts that are hurt. Then risk management communicates that information to local managers to make sure that safety-and-prevention programs are appropriate and will help reduce the amount of claims and their costs.

“The Riskonnect dashboards layout all this valuable information in easy-to-use tables and charts, making it simple for us to study the data and implement necessary safety changes,” said Waters.

ROI on a Values Collection Module

SponsoredContent_Riskonnect

Enterprise Integration

At the start of the process, Waters never imagined just how many other departments would use the tool. The finance department uses the system for asset management. The fleet administrator uses it to have drivers sign off on its manuals. Even the facilities department is jumping on board, using the Riskonnect system to identify when properties need repairs to big-ticket items like roofs or windows.

The company is also looking to report global property claims, transit claims and employers’ liability claims through the platform. It’s even evaluating if it can use it on the shop floor with health-and-safety team members having easy access to the system via iPads.

”The Riskonnect platform can help many different departments with a wide variety of tasks,” said Waters. “It’s really making risk management a much more strategic contributor to the company.”

“I hit a button once and it runs the report for me. The simplicity is unreal,” Waters said. “Plus, it gives us better information that we can communicate to our insurance carriers, and gives them increased confidence about the risks they’re insuring. Before, the process could take up to three months, and now we get it done in less than a month.”

Happy End-Users

Waters’ enthusiasm for the product is clear, but he’s not alone. End-users are raving about how easy, intuitive and customizable it is. For example, training end-users used to consist of holding approximately 15 different webinars to walk everyone through the process. Now, it’s accomplished in one easy-to-understand mass communication through the Riskonnect portal.

The end users even helped Waters and the Avery Dennison team add efficiencies that improve the entire process. On the property reporting side, they suggested adding an attachment tool for adding spreadsheets – so the information is easy to find the following year.

“It’s amazing when you give the end users a product and you see how they come back to you with advice that you never even thought of,” said Waters. “That speaks volumes for the system.”

In just 18 months, Riskonnect changed the way Avery Dennison does business — something Waters can’t hide his enthusiasm about.

“I don’t consider them just a vendor,” said Waters. “I consider them a long-term strategic partner.”

This article was produced by Riskonnect and not the Risk & Insurance® editorial team.


Riskonnect is the provider of a premier, enterprise-class technology platform for the risk management industry.
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