Litigation Risk

Liberty! Fraternity! Liability!

Universities, fraternities and their local chapters, and individuals may face liability for sexual assault, alcohol abuse or other actions.
By: | April 13, 2015 • 4 min read
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Recent incidents alleging alcohol abuse, sexual assault and other bad behaviors at America’s college fraternities have drawn national attention. Much of the discussion has focused on causes and prevention, but with litigation inevitable in some of these incidents, questions of liability are sure to arise.

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Individuals directly involved in such incidents face potential liability, but claims can also extend to the local and national fraternity organizations, to the universities and colleges with which they are affiliated, and even to the local chapters’ officers and their families.

“It all depends on how the claim or the complaint that is filed in court is framed. What are the allegations in that litigation? Who are the named defendants, and what are the circumstances of how it happened and can it be corroborated?” said Michael Liebowitz, senior director of enterprise risk management and insurance at New York University.

The local and national fraternities may face liability for incidents that  occur during fraternity events, especially on fraternity premises. Most local chapters have liability coverage purchased by their national organizations through a handful of companies that specialize in insuring fraternities and sororities. The largest of these, James R. Favor & Co., was actually acquired by a group of national fraternity organizations in 2006.

But just because a fraternity has general liability insurance, doesn’t mean a particular incident will be covered.

But just because a fraternity has general liability insurance, doesn’t mean a particular incident will be covered.

“Insurance policies typically exclude any criminal violations. So if it’s considered a crime, the policy is not going to cover it,” said Leta Finch, leader of Aon Risk Solutions’ national higher education practice.

In March 2014, “The Atlantic” reported that most fraternities have stringent, but largely unenforced, alcohol policies in place. The vast majority of fraternity-related injuries, assaults and other incidents involved violations of alcohol policies, which effectively provide liability protection for the fraternities while placing the individual members outside the coverage.

Lisa Zimmaro, assistant vice president for risk management and treasury at Temple University in Philadelphia, said that “fraternity insurance carriers have huge exclusions for alcohol-related events and sexual assault. … If the insurance carrier for the fraternity excludes certain acts, then the victim would have to look elsewhere for compensation for damages.”

One place they might seek compensation is from the university or college with which the fraternity is affiliated — and the nature of that affiliation can help determine what liability the institution might face.

Institutions that provide fraternities with space on campus, security, financial support or other resources could be perceived as having greater liability.

Closer relationships mean greater liability. Institutions that provide fraternities with space on campus, security, financial support or other resources could be perceived as having greater liability. Those with more distant and less structured affiliations would face fewer liability issues.

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Institutions should also be aware of exclusions to their coverage.

“If it is excluded on the policy and there is a finding in a civil action, the university would end up paying out of pocket. Just because there is an insurance exclusion doesn’t get them off the hook,” said Zimmaro, who added that institutions should also be aware of sub-limits.

“There maybe sub-limits, even if there’s not an outright exclusion, maybe coverage up to $5 million instead of $25 million. Know the limits of what your policy is going to pay,” she said.

The best way to avoid liability may be to prevent fraternity incidents from occurring, but ironically, codes of conduct and prohibitions on behaviors can increase liability if they lack adequate follow through.

“The minute colleges and universities start to dictate policy on fraternities and sororities, they are vicariously picking up liability, because then they are going to be forced to police it.” — Michael Liebowitz, senior director of enterprise risk management and insurance, New York University

“The minute colleges and universities start to dictate policy on fraternities and sororities, they are vicariously picking up liability, because then they are going to be forced to police it.

“[If] something bad happens because someone broke the rules, then the question is, ‘Why didn’t you have surveillance in place to monitor what was going on?’ So it is very much a double-edged sword,” said Leibowitz.

Finch pointed out that enforcing codes of conduct that lack clear consequences can also leave institutions exposed to liability from violators who feel they have been disciplined unfairly, treated inconsistently or been denied due diligence rights.

Parents of fraternity members can also face liability — and not just the parents of those directly involved in incidents.

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Leibowitz said that while primary liability lies with the fraternity member who committed the acts in question, “the rest of it lies with the officers of the chapter, from the president straight on down, because they’re the ones that set the tone, they’re the ones that are supposed to control what goes on. … If you want to be an officer, it comes with responsibility, and responsibility comes with liability.”

Zimmaro agreed. “Families are sued all the time for the acts of their students who are involved in incidents involving any kind of organization where someone gets hurt. An attorney is going to look for a compensation source, and if it’s mom and dad, then it’s mom and dad.”

Jon McGoran is a novelist and magazine editor based outside of Philadelphia. He can be reached at riskletters@lrp.com.
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Risk Management

The Profession

Scott Clark agreed to join Miami-Dade County Public Schools for two years to help build its risk management department. Then he forgot to leave.
By: | March 2, 2015 • 5 min read

R&I: What was your first job?

I got into the insurance business working for the Combined Insurance Co. of America on a part-time basis while I was attending the University of Illinois.

I was interested in the business partly because my great-grandfather started a regional property insurance company in 1917 in Indianapolis, Ind., named Merchants Property Insurance Co. of Indiana. It is still family owned and I succeeded my father on the board of directors when he passed away in 2011.

R&I: How did you come to work in risk management?

I was recruited by Wausau Insurance Cos. … As it turned out, the Superintendent of Schools for Miami-Dade County Public Schools (M-DCPS), Leonard Britton, had been reading about risk management and told his friend — who happened to be my boss with Wausau — that he wanted to create a risk management department from what was the current insurance department.

I [agreed] to meet with Superintendent Britton … he told me of his vision. Ultimately, I told Dr. Britton that I would come to the school for two years and help him build a risk management program for the district [but] I forgot to leave. I’m currently in the middle of my 29th year here!

R6-14p42_Profession.inddR&I: What’s been the biggest change in the risk management and insurance industry since you’ve been in it?

I think the biggest change is the fact that risk managers are not just viewed as insurance purchasers but professionals that sit at the highest levels of our organizations and serve business leaders on a macro level rather than just serving as insurance people within our organizations.

With a push from the risk management community, the insurance industry has become more accountable to their policyholders. This includes listening to the risk management community with regard to the types of coverage risk managers are seeking, including terms and conditions; issuing policies in a timely manner; and overall becoming a partner in creating strategic risk solutions.

R&I: What emerging commercial risk most concerns you?

Like many other industry professionals I am concerned about cyber risk, but my concern transcends the normal risks associated with cyber. It’s not just about making sure that … the personal information of my 345,000 students and 50,000 full and part-time employees is not hacked.

We have a significant focus on placing technology in the hands of our students, and to move them from traditional book learning into a high-tech environment of teaching and learning. That includes providing students with tablets, outfitting classrooms with SmartBoards and empowering all 345,000 students to become technologically savvy so that they will be able to compete in a technologically sophisticated world.

When you do that, cyber capability and protecting the risk around it becomes paramount. We must take necessary steps to protect [employees’ and students’] personal information, Social Security numbers, grades, and family information. Many fees which were once paid with cash are now paid with credit cards at our 400+ locations and this information must be protected as well.

With a push from the risk management community, the insurance industry has become more accountable to their policyholders.

R&I: Who is your mentor and why?

My mentor is a gentleman whom I have had the privilege of knowing and working with for my entire career at Miami-Dade County Public Schools. His name is Jim Marshall and he is a principal in the consulting firm of Silver Insurance Consultants based in St Petersburg, Fla.

I’ve worked with him for the better part of my 29 years at the Miami-Dade schools. His firm has been a consultant to Miami-Dade in property/casualty and risk management including claims administration. Jim has been instrumental in providing wording for many of the district’s manuscript insurance policies.

He is one of the most knowledgeable people I know and someone I would go to when I need clarity on how to handle a risk management issue.

R&I: What have you accomplished that you are proudest of?

Being identified as a national leader in risk management and serving as president of the Risk and Insurance Management Society (RIMS) in 2011.

R&I: What is your favorite book or movie?

Devil in the White City by Erik Larson is my favorite book. The book is set in Chicago around 1893 and is an interesting depiction of the 1893 Chicago World’s Fair intertwined with fictional characters and sub-plots.

Being from Illinois, I found the book fascinating for its historic depiction of the creation of the buildings for the 1893 World’s Fair on the South side of Chicago close to where the University of Chicago now is, and Erik Larson’s ability to augment this nonfiction story with creative fictional story lines and sub-plots.

I remember vividly how young the North Korean soldiers appeared to be, and I was only 20 years of age myself at the time.

R&I: What is the most unusual/interesting place you have ever visited?

Seoul, South Korea. I was fortunate enough to be able to travel with my best friend and fraternity brother and his family my senior year at U of I. His father was a project engineer for Amoco and they were building a refinery in the Seoul area.

I believe it struck me as a kid from Illinois as it was so different from other places I had traveled and we were actually able to go to the demilitarized zone and step into North Korea.

I remember vividly how young the North Korean soldiers appeared to be, and I was only 20 years of age myself at the time.

R&I: What is the riskiest thing you have ever done?

As a risk manager, I dare say that I typically do not participate in risky things; however, the two things which come to mind which I would typically not do include taking a small seaplane from Vancouver to Victoria (we returned by way of Ferry).

The other was a helicopter ride over the Hawaiian waterfalls and the pilot realized halfway through the trip that he was on the wrong radio frequency and unable to communicate with other helicopters in the area.

R&I: If the world has a modern hero, who is it and why?

Heroes are very personal and it’s not my place to name one for the world; however, my father who passed away in 2011 was one of mine. He taught me right from wrong, supported me and was very proud of my career in the insurance industry.

Janet Aschkenasy is a freelance financial writer based in New York. She can be reached at riskletters@lrp.com.
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Sponsored Content by CorVel

RIMS Recap: Tech Trends that Could Change Everything

The future is here, and emerging technology is transforming the landscape of workers' compensation.
By: | May 8, 2015 • 5 min read
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Last month, Gordon Clemons, CEO and Chairman of CorVel Corporation, presented at the RIMS Conference in New Orleans, La. about emerging technology and how it is impacting risk management and workers’ compensation. The discussion served as a springboard for new insights on how technology will change the industry, and reaffirmed the need for integrated systems and human interaction for the best results.

The presentation noted the future is here – and technology is constantly evolving in hopes of outpacing tomorrow’s needs. As these technology platforms become more inherent in daily life, the gap in translating their utilization to workers’ compensation will begin to close.

Technology in Healthcare

Gordon Clemons, CEO and Chairman, CorVel Corporation

While many consumer-based technology advancements exist in other industries, perhaps most notably in the retail space helping vendors to reduce various delays in the sales experience, people may forget that healthcare, too, is a consumer industry. And as such, healthcare also experiences workflow lags, which can be collapsed.

While patients and claims may not lend themselves as freely to mobile applications and technology that subscribes to the “Internet of Things” philosophy, the rapid rate of development foretells the not-too-far-off arrival of the “a-ha,” “wow factor”-type application that consumers are seeking in the healthcare industry.

Once we get there, we can only expect that the Pangea of resources will yield better outcomes. The potential impact to medical management includes more affordable/accessible healthcare, patient convenience, personal assistance, automatic inputs to claims systems and less administration from both patients and injured workers.

“Healthcare is stubborn about change. There are more data points in healthcare and there is a greater need for high quality and accuracy,” Clemons said.

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Tech Trends for the Next Digital Decade

As an industry advocate in all things innovation, CorVel has been keeping tabs on emerging tech trends. As they begin to influence in other industries, it sparks the question – will they eventually change workers’ compensation?

Here are some of the trends on CorVel’s radar:

Wearables

Smart phones and tablets were the first mobile devices to really start to gain traction across people’s personal lives. Since then, wearables (like Fitbits and smart watches) have been part of the next digital generation to be taken up by consumers.

As these personal devices quickly advance, wearables could offer payors and employers added insight into the wellness of claimants through the extent of their retrievable data.

Beacons

Beacons are devices that use low-energy Bluetooth connections to communicate messages or triggers directly to a smart device (such as a phone or tablet). Retailers have started using this technology, sending offers to near-by consumers’ phones. Now the concepts of smart mirrors and smart walls offer a one-stop-shop with recommendations related to the preferences of the shopper – making a hyper-efficient business model. It is possible that we could see these devices adapted to being a catalyst for healthcare’s business model by reducing the delays of administrative work.

Drones

Formally known as unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV), drones can be remote-controlled or flown autonomously through pre-defined flight plans within their internal systems. Some carriers are testing the use of drones to potentially be used to evaluate property damage and responding to natural disasters.

Telemedicine

As most injuries reported in workers’ compensation are musculoskeletal injuries, the industry lends itself well to the benefits of telecommunications and telemedicine. With the rise of electronic capabilities, telemedicine becomes another option to help guide an injured worker through their entire episode of care, reducing time delays.

In order to get to that point in time, implementing these trends (and those that are yet to be launched) will only be as successful as the population willing to accept them. Buy-in will require a commitment to the long-standing pillars of the industry. According to Clemons, “While technology can truly move the needle in workers’ compensation, it will take more than bells and whistles to maximize its impact.”

“People’s feelings are valid. The skepticism surrounding new technology is not misplaced, but neither is the enthusiasm,” Clemons said.

New Trends, Same Priorities

SponsoredContent_CorVelBeyond the buzzwords and hype surrounding the latest apps and devices, for new technology to succeed within the workers’ compensation realm, it boils down to the two primary concepts that drive the industry to begin with – effective infrastructure and a people-first philosophy.

The power of applicable resources and the actionable data that results from them is in the foundation of the systems themselves; that primarily being through the influence of integration. It is not a new concept; however, as technology advances and the reach of analytic capabilities broadens, it is important to find a provider that can harness this data and channel it into effective workflows to increase efficiencies and promote better outcomes.

CorVel’s proprietary claims management system has been developed and supported by an in-house, full-time information systems division to be intuitive and user-friendly. Complex, proprietary algorithms link codified data across the system, facilitating collaboration between services, workflows, customers, and technology and eliminating the risk that a crucial piece of information will be missed. The result is an active “ecosystem” providing customers with actionable data to provide the most accurate, comprehensive picture at any time, while also collapsing inherent delays.

For the injured worker, the critical human touch connection in the workers’ compensation process can never be minimized. By cutting lag time throughout the various inefficiencies underlying the industry’s workflows, CorVel can connect injured workers with quality care sooner. As systems advance, claims and managed care associates do not have to spend as much time on administrative work and will instead be able to devote more time to the injured workers, reviving the human touch aspect that is just as impactful within the industry.

Regardless of the technology that lies ahead, CorVel looks to the future with investments in innovation, while not losing sight of their role and responsibility to clients and patients. Dedicated to constant improvement for the services they provide injured workers and industry payors, CorVel is committed to improving industry services one app, click, drone (or whatever is yet to come) at a time – perhaps something to discuss in San Diego at next year’s RIMS conference.

For more information, visit corvel.com.

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This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with CorVel Corporation. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.




CorVel is a national provider of risk management solutions for employers, third party administrators, insurance companies and government agencies seeking to control costs and promote positive outcomes.
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