Workplace Hearing Loss

Risks of Hearing Loss Remain Flat, With Exceptions

The risk of workplace hearing loss has remained steady for decades, but more needs to be done in high-risk industries such as construction and mining.
By: | March 27, 2015 • 2 min read
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The prevalence of hearing loss among U.S. workers has remained at 20 percent for the last 30 years. Researchers say there have been improvements in most areas, but certain sectors continue to put workers at risk.

Occupational hearing loss is permanent and potentially debilitating but preventable, according to government experts. They looked at audiograms for 1.8 million workers between 1981 and 2010 to estimate hearing loss trends in various industries.

“The adjusted risk for incident hearing loss decreased over time when all industry sectors were combined,” according to their report, published in the American Journal of Industrial Medicine. “However, the risk remained high for workers in healthcare and social assistance, and the prevalence was consistently high for mining and construction workers.”

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Some 22 million workers are exposed to noise hazards at work. Hazardous noise, a single instantaneous high noise exposure, or exposure to chemicals that damage hearing can result in occupational hearing loss. The study from researchers at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health is said to be the first to offer a broad look at hearing loss risks to workers over a 30-year period.

The construction industry had the highest number of new hearing loss cases during the study period, possibly due to less stringent hearing conservation requirements compared with other industries. Also, the seasonal nature of work involving independent contractors makes it difficult to implement preventive measures.

Mining has the highest percentage of noise exposed workers than any other industry, the report said. A small fraction of workers in the health care and social assistance sector are exposed to hearing risks. However, the vast majority report not wearing protection.

“There is no industry where workers can be considered ‘safe’ from hearing loss.”

Nancy Grover is the president of NMG Consulting and the Editor of Workers' Compensation Report, a publication of our parent company, LRP Publications. She can be reached at riskletters@lrp.com.
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Risk Insider: Allan Ridings

Protecting Health Care Workers From Violence

By: | February 20, 2015 • 3 min read
Allan Ridings is a senior risk management & patient safety specialist at the Cooperative of American Physicians, Inc. He has more than 25 years of experience in risk management and health care operations. He can be reached at aridings@capphysicians.com.

Most of us have seen it happen to a colleague or been on the receiving end of abuse from an upset patient, family member or some other individual. Inevitably, we ask ourselves the following questions:

  • What happened and how did it escalate to this level?
  • Was it something I did?
  • Was it something another physician or caregiver did or didn’t do?
  • What signs did I miss?
  • How can I be more observant and prepare for this in the future?

I’m talking about workplace violence in health care settings.

Workplace violence is considered any act or threat of physical violence, verbal harassment, intimidation or other disorderly behavior. These actions are often stressful, frustrating and can be physically harmful.

Many state Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) departments believe that a well-written and implemented workplace violence prevention program, with top-down guidance and staff training can reduce workplace violence.

It is essential that all workers understand the policy and know that all allegations of workplace violence will be investigated and remedied promptly.

Health care workers face an increased risk of work-related assaults stemming from several factors. Some include:

  • Patient frustration over service delays.
  • Burglaries of drugs or money from health care offices.
  • A growing proximity of gang members, addicts, or distraught family members to patients.
  • A growing frequency of weapons possession.
  • Fluctuations in staffing levels. Some attacks happen when staff is on a meal break or attending to other patients.
  • A lack of staff training in recognizing and managing escalating types of violent behavior.

The risk of assault can be minimized or prevented if employers take appropriate precautions. One of the best protections that can be offered to health care workers is for their workplace to establish a zero tolerance policy toward any workplace violence. The policy must cover all workers, patients, clients, visitors and anyone else who may come in contact with personnel of the facility.

Having a zero-tolerance policy can assist staff members with common situations that may arise. Staff should be well-versed in conflict resolution during stressful situations. This will require training. Some of these policies should incorporate:

  • A written program for workplace violence, safety and security that should be incorporated into the office safety and health program.
  • Clear goals and objectives to prevent workplace violence that should be adaptable to specific situations in each department or location.
  • Responsibility for the program with individuals or teams through appropriate training and skills.
  • Adequate resources for this effort and the team.
  • A patient acknowledgment of “rights and responsibilities” including the facility’s zero-tolerance policy as it relates to verbal or physical abuse towards all staff, patients, or visitors.

A well-prepared workplace violence policy is a crucial and essential component of workplace safety. With this in place, educated staff members can evaluate and recognize potentially threatening situations and feel comfortable knowing they have the tools and the administrative support to professionally take control of a situation, if necessary. Some of these methods also provide employees with adaptable strengths to maintain safe working conditions, improve morale, safety and effectiveness.

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Sponsored: Aspen Insurance

A Modern Claims Philosophy: Proactive and Integrated

Aspen Insurance views the expertise and data of their claims professionals as a valuable asset.
By: | March 2, 2015 • 4 min read
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According to some experts, “The best claim is the one that never happens.”

But is that even remotely realistic?

Experienced risk professionals know that in the real world, claims and losses are inevitable. After all, it’s called Risk Management, not Risk Avoidance.

And while no one likes losses, there are rich lessons to be gleaned from the claims management process. Through careful tracking and analysis of losses, risk professionals spot gaps in their risk control programs and identify new or emerging risks.

Aspen Insurance embraces this philosophy by viewing the data and expertise of their claims operation as a valuable asset. Unlike more traditional carriers, Aspen Insurance integrates their claims professionals into all of their client work – from the initial risk assessment and underwriting process through ongoing risk management consulting and loss control.

This proactive and integrated approach results in meaningful reductions to the frequency and severity of client losses. But when the inevitable does happen, Aspen Insurance claims professionals utilize their established understanding of client risks and operations to produce some truly amazing solutions.

“I worked at several of the most well known and respected insurance companies in my many years as a claims executive. But few of them utilize an approach that is as innovative as Aspen Insurance,” said Stephen Perrella, senior vice president, casualty claims, at Aspen Insurance.

SponsoredContent_Aspen“We do a lot of trending and data analysis to provide as much information as possible to our clients. Our analytics can help clients improve upon their own risk management procedures.”
— Stephen Perrella, Senior Vice President, Casualty Claims, Aspen Insurance

Utilizing claims expertise to improve underwriting

Acting as adviser and advocate, Aspen integrates the entire process under a coverage coordinator who ensures that the underwriters, claims and insureds agree on consistent, clear definitions and protocols. With claims professionals involved in the initial account review and the development of form language, Aspen’s underwriters have a full sense of risks so they can provide more specific and meaningful coverage, and identify risks and exclusions that the underwriter might not consider during a routine underwriting process.

“Most insurers don’t ever want to talk about claims and underwriting in the same sentence,” said Perrella. “That archaic view can potentially hurt the insurance company as well as their business partners.”
SponsoredContent_AspenSponsoredContent_AspenAspen Insurance considered a company working on a large bridge refurbishment project on the West Coast as a potential insured, posing the array of generally anticipated construction-related risks. During underwriting, its claims managers discovered there was a large oil storage facility underneath the bridge. If a worker didn’t properly tether his or her tools, or a piece of steel fell onto a tank and fractured it, the consequences would be severe. Shutting down a widely used waterway channel for an oil cleanup would be devastating. The business interruption claims alone would be astronomical.

“We narrowed the opportunity for possible claims that the underwriter was unaware existed at the outset,” said Perrella.

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Risk management improved

Claims professionals help Aspen Insurance’s clients with their risk management programs. When data analysis reveals high numbers of claims in a particular area, Aspen readily shares that information with the client. The Aspen team then works with the client to determine if there are better ways to handle certain processes.

“We do a lot of trending and data analysis to provide as much information as possible to our clients,” said Perrella. “Our analytics can help clients improve upon their own risk management procedures.”
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SponsoredContent_AspenFor a large restaurant-and-entertainment group with locations in New York and Las Vegas, Aspen’s consultative approach has been critical. After meeting with risk managers and using analytics to study trends in the client’s portfolio, Aspen learned that the sheer size and volume of customers at each location led to disparate profiles of patron injuries.

Specifically, the organization had a high number of glass-related incidents across its multiple venues. So Aspen’s claims and underwriting professionals helped the organization implement new reporting protocols and risk-prevention strategies that led to a significant drop in glass-related claims over the following two years. Where one location would experience a disproportionate level of security assault or slip & fall claims, the possible genesis for those claims was discussed with the insured and corrective steps explored in response. Aspen’s proactive management of the account and working relationship with its principals led the organization to make changes that not only lowered the company’s exposures, but also kept patrons safer.

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World-class claims management

Despite expert planning and careful prevention, losses and claims are inevitable. With Aspen’s claims department involved from the earliest stages of risk assessment, the department has developed world-class claims-processing capability.

“When a claim does arrive, everyone knows exactly how to operate,” said Perrella. “By understanding the perspectives of both the underwriters and the actuaries, our claims folks have grown to be better business people.

“We have dramatically reduced the potential for any problematic communication breakdown between our claims team, broker and the client,” said Perrella.
SponsoredContent_AspenSponsoredContent_AspenA fire ripped through an office building rendering it unusable by its seven tenants. An investigation revealed that an employee of the client intentionally set the fire. The client had not purchased business interruption insurance, and instead only had coverage for the physical damage to the building.

The Aspen claims team researched a way to assist the client in filing a third-party claim through secondary insurance that covered the business interruption portion of the loss. The attention, knowledge and creativity of the claims team saved the client from possible insurmountable losses.

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Modernize your carrier relationship

Aspen Insurance’s claims philosophy is a great example of how this carrier’s innovative perspective is redefining the underwriter-client relationship. Learn more about how Aspen Insurance can benefit your risk management program at http://www.aspen.co/insurance/.

Stephen Perrella, Senior Vice President, Casualty, can be reached at Stephen.perrella@aspen-insurance.com.

This article is provided for news and information purposes only and does not necessarily represent Aspen’s views and does constitute legal advice. This article reflects the opinion of the author at the time it was written taking into account market, regulatory and other conditions at the time of writing which may change over time. Aspen does not undertake a duty to update the article.

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This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with Aspen Insurance. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.




Aspen Insurance is a business segment of Aspen Insurance Holdings Limited. It provides insurance for property, casualty, marine, energy and transportation, financial and professional lines, and programs business.
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