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2014 NWC&DC

Buying In To Workers’ Comp

Private equity executives said they add resources and strategies to help their workers’ comp portfolio companies grow.
By: | November 21, 2014 • 2 min read
PrivateEquity

Private equity’s interest in the workers’ compensation industry isn’t going to diminish anytime soon, according to three P/E senior executives.

“I think you will continue to see significant activity in the workers’ compensation space,” said Hunter Philbrick, managing director of Hellman & Friedman, whose firm (along with Stone Point Capital) acquired Sedgwick Claims Management Services in 2010 and sold it to Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co. earlier this year.

P/E firms get a bad reputation for ripping apart companies, he said. “That’s a very small minority and not really true of any of our firms up here.”

Philbrick was joined on the panel by Jeffrey McKibben, managing principal of Odyssey Investment Partners, which acquired majority interest in York Risk Services in 2010, and acquired and later sold One Call Care Management; and Camilo Horvilleur, principal of H.I.G. Capital, which acquired PMSI Group in 2008, selling it in October 2013, after which it merged with Progressive Medical and became Helios.

Moderating the “Private Equity’s Major Deals and Their Impact on Workers’ Compensation” panel, presented at the 2014 National Workers’ Compensation and Disability Management Conference & Expo in Las Vegas, was Joseph Paduda, principal of Health Strategy Associates.

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McKibben said his firm looks for companies that “add value for their clients” and whose leaders are team oriented and flexible.

“We push, we pull and add resources and jet fuel … so they can do more,” he said.

“Chemistry,” said Horvilleur, “is very, very important. … If you don’t like us, run for the hills because you are going to be stuck with us for years.”

That’s not to say, he said, that private equity firms come in to micromanage their portfolio companies. “Most of our investment in workers’ comp, we had a great team that we backed early on,” noting that his firm focuses on small entrepreneurial companies.

What H.I.G. Capital does is help visualize what it can do to help the company grow and help support the management team, he said.

There must be clarity of purpose and alignment between the company and P/E firm on the vision for the future, Philbrick said.

“Our goal is to make our companies more critical, more tied in and better for their own customers,” he said. “I think at the end of the day, it should be a net positive.”

Anne Freedman is managing editor of Risk & Insurance. She can be reached at afreedman@lrp.com.
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2014 NWC&DC

Facing the Road Ahead

Carriers have serious concerns about the health care industry’s impact on workers’ comp, but are encouraged by the savvy of employers.
By: | November 20, 2014 • 3 min read
WCInsurance

There are both new and evolving challenges facing workers’ comp practitioners in the coming years. But there is also an increasing level of sophistication among those who are working to meet those challenges.

Top carriers came together for a meeting of the minds for a session entitled “Workers’ Comp Insurance Exposed: Views from the Industry’s Leading Carriers.”

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The session, presented at the 2014 National Workers’ Compensation and Disability Management Conference & Expo in Las Vegas, was led by Eric Silverstein, senior vice president and risk management leader for Lockton Cos., included participation from Russell Johnston, casualty president for the Americas Region with AIG Inc.; Debbie Michel, executive vice president, commercial markets with Liberty Mutual Insurance and president of Helmsman Management Services; and Sean D. Martin, vice president with The Travelers Cos.

One development carriers are encouraged by is an increase in employers exploring benefits integration, bringing together disability, health care and workers’ comp.

“The challenge is that many customers look at it in a bifurcated way,” said Johnston. A more unified approach can help employers address the issues that affect outcomes across the spectrum, which are of increasing concern for employers as ongoing economic woes continue to force older employees to work as long as they’re physically able.

A more holistic approach can help improve outcomes from both the occupational and the non-occupational sides by working to improve the overall health of the employee population.

“If you have a healthy employee, regardless of age,” said Johnston, “you’re going to have a better outcome.”

The potential to positively affect outcomes and cut costs across the whole of an employee population can also provide substance for workers’ comp professionals trying to make the business case for wellness investments such as on-site gyms or an on-site nutritionist, Johnston said.

Going forward, there are plenty of positives to build from, panelists said. Currently, 22 states have filed for rate decreases.

“If there’s any point in time where I think the industry has been exceptionally good at risk selection and pricing, it’s today,” said Johnston. And employers that have been diligent about managing their risk profiles can expect significant improvement.

Still, there’s a great deal of room for improvement, as evidenced by California’s ongoing challenges. Despite the most recent round of reforms, California is still plagued by dramatic increases in injury frequency and severity, and by crushing backlogs in the independent medical review process.

The uncertain fate of TRIA’s renewal is still on the radar for employers as well as carriers, but panelists said they are cautiously optimistic.

They are somewhat more concerned about other looming threats such as physician capacity and hospital consolidation, the Affordable Care Act, and cost shifting into the workers’ comp space, said Martin.

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Carriers are also closely watching the development of interest in workers’ comp alternatives.

The formation of ARAWC – the Association for Responsible Alternatives to Workers’ Compensation – by many large companies is a clear sign that there is interest in an expansion of alternatives to state workers’ compensation systems, such as the nonsubscriber system in Texas and the recently enacted Oklahoma option, to other states.

In the end, said Michel, it will be up to states to find the “balance between doing the right thing for the economy and doing the right thing for the injured worker.”

Michelle Kerr is associate editor of Risk & Insurance. She can be reached at mkerr@lrp.com
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Sponsored Content by Riskonnect

3 + 3: Theory of Risk

A risk management professional constructed a versatile system that he can really believe in.
By: | November 3, 2014 • 5 min read
SponsoredContent_Riskonnect

Anthony Valsamakis doesn’t just practice risk management, he wrote a book about it. And he doesn’t just consult with quants, he is one.

“Risk management has been in my blood for so long that I have to stop myself, otherwise I could go into a two-hour monologue,” said Valsamakis, whose career in the discipline goes back almost 35 years, to his first job with the Standard General Insurance Company.

In 1990, the London-based chairman of the Eikos Group received a doctorate in Business Economics. In 1992, “The Theory & Principles of Risk Management” was published, with Valsamakis the principal author, and is now in its 4th edition.

Valsamakis worked first with a carrier, then as a commodities broker, before taking up an academic post. The company he started in 1999, the Eikos Group, has a risk consulting arm, with clients in most industrial sectors, including the food, mining, forestry, industrial paper and packaging and banking industries. The group also includes a transportation risk brokerage and a Bermuda-based carrier.

SponsoredContent_Riskonnect“I think the idea of having a secure data base that everyone can access and can update at any moment is by far the best innovation that I can see happening in the information game.”
– Anthony Valsamakis, Chairman, Risk Financing Strategy, Eikos Group

For as long as he can remember, Valsamakis sought ways to get better information on the risks he underwrites, brokers or consults on.

“Over many years we’ve tried hard to increase the quality and timeliness of the information that enables us to do just that,” Valsamakis said.

Finally, it looks like Valsamakis has found a risk management information systems platform that enables him to do just that.

For the past year and a half, Valsamakis has been using a system developed by Riskonnect.

SponsoredContent_RiskonnectValsamakis likes the Riskonnect approach for a number of reasons – one of the key reasons that the platform can be readily adapted for each of his clients, regardless of industry.

“What’s useful for me is that the platform basically resides within the client’s systems,” he said.

The information he needs to prioritize, depends on which client he is working with.

“By definition, depending on where I am working and what I am doing, risk management priorities are very different,” Valsamakis said.

The Riskonnect platform provides the necessary flexibility.

SponsoredContent_RiskonnectA mine, for example, could be in a location in Africa or South America with a high degree of political risk. A key risk for a furniture maker might be around trade secrets, the possibility that a disgruntled employee would leak a pricing catalogue to competitors. For a packaging manufacturer, their material supply chain is of the utmost importance, and so on.

For each client, Valsamakis can use Riskonnect platform and work with the client to compile the information that is most relevant to that client and its industry and enter that into a secure system.

“All of these are template facts that you can easily put into the Riskonnect system,” Valsamakis said.

The Riskonnect platform is housed within the client’s information technology system, and it is transparent enough, to give Valsamakis and his client access to the same sets of data.

“I think the idea of having a secure data base that everyone can access and can update at any moment is by far the best innovation that I can see happening in the information game,” he said.

Whose System Is It?

Valsamakis has been around long enough to know a few things about data and risk transfer. He’s seen a number of risk information management systems put out by brokers, for example, that he thinks are set up more for the broker’s business model than for the sharing of information.

Generally speaking, information about an insured’s risks come from the broker and the insured. The Riskonnect system works, according to Valsamakis, because it is designed to be adapted to the client, not the broker.

“I have seen efforts by brokers, for example, over the years to produce a type of risk information platform that becomes theirs,” Valsamakis said.

“It’s been a perennial problem in the industry, where depending on which broker you end up with, you’ll end up with system A, B or C,” he said.

The Underwriter Needs to Know

SponsoredContent_RiskonnectUsing Riskonnect, Valsamakis encourages clients to be as transparent as possible, in order to give the most complete information to underwriters.

“For me the question is, ‘What is the volatility around the asset and can there be an impact on the balance sheet of our clients?’” he said.

“We need to describe this exposure in various contexts so that the underwriters know what they are covering,” he said.

It’s basic human psychology. If an underwriter doesn’t feel they are getting enough information about a particular risk, they will take a negative view of that risk.

The more accurate the information Valsamakis has about a client’s exposures, the better the pricing he gets from underwriters.

“If you were an underwriter putting your capital and risk and I gave you little information, you would actually be less inclined to look at the risk in favorable terms. There will be a natural inclination to downgrade it,” he said.

Where Valsamakis sees enormous value is in the Riskonnect system ability to tag which can be revisited at a later stage.

“It’s amazing how clients forget, in the passage of time, that there are profiles that have changed for better or worse.”

A Long-Term Investment

The Eikos Group invested significantly in the Riskonnect product and are taking it to a number of clients. The transparency of the system and the advantage it gives the Eikos Group and its clients with underwriters is in itself a business advantage over the competition.

“We made a decision as a small company, relatively speaking, to invest a lot of money in Riskonnect and be very proactive about it,” Valsamakis said.

“When I talk to executives I say we invested in it because it’s going to save our clients money. Better information will lead to a lower cost of risk,” he said.

“If I’m talking to someone at a high level, that’s fairly easily understood.”

SponsoredContent

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This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with Riskonnect. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.


Riskonnect is the provider of a premier, enterprise-class technology platform for the risk management industry.
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