2016 Risk All Star: Carlos Dezayas

Freeing Cargo From Captivity

Kraft and Heinz announced their merger in the spring of 2015, around the time of Heinz’s May 1st renewal. The impending marriage spurred Senior Manager of Corporate Risk Management Carlos Dezayas to rejigger his insurance portfolio ahead of the acquisition’s finalization.

“We were looking for the most efficient structure for the combined program so that everything would be in place on day one of the merger,” Dezayas said.

He found that the Kraft Heinz cargo program was sorely in need of an overhaul.

Carlos Dezayas Senior Manager, Corporate Risk Management, The Kraft Heinz Company

Carlos Dezayas
Senior Manager, Corporate Risk Management, The Kraft Heinz Company

“The cargo program was run through our captive, with a $25,000 retention held at the business unit level and a $225,000 retention at the captive. The problem was that we only had captive licenses in the EU, U.S., Canada, Australia and New Zealand,” he said.

This meant that import/export operations from countries such as China, Japan, Korea, Costa Rica and Brazil were vulnerable. Whenever a claim breached the local deductible but not the captive deductible, it was difficult to get cash into those countries to make claim payments; large cash infusions were subject to a variety of local taxes.

Heinz also could not collect premium from the unlicensed countries.

“Essentially we were overcharging the business units in the licensed countries to make up for the fact that we could not charge any premium from the unlicensed countries,” Dezayas said.


Working with Marsh broker Herman Brito, Dezayas removed the cargo program from the captive structure, retained the local business unit deductibles and established locally admitted policies written by AIG.

The move was atypical — most companies don’t move from a captive to a fully insured plan — but it paid off.

“A year and a half down the road, this seems to be a more stable structure for us,” he said.

“It has allowed the business units to be comfortable knowing we have the coverage in place and that their claims will be paid. It also creates more visibility and transparency across the entire program, which is what senior management expects from their insurance portfolio.”

“[The new program structure] has allowed the business units to be comfortable knowing we have the coverage in place and that their claims will be paid.” — Carlos Dezayas, senior manager, corporate risk management, The Kraft Heinz Co.

In addition to increasing efficiency, the new non-captive structure also means Kraft Heinz can collect premium from every business unit while shifting administrative and claims management expenses away from the captive.

Brito, assistant vice president at Marsh, and a 2016 Power Broker® winner, praised Dezayas for his willingness to tackle a project outside of his area of expertise.

“Carlos came from a strong insurance background, but not particularly in marine. When we were undergoing our renewal strategy, he quickly familiarized himself with marine terminology and set out to learn the latest and greatest in the marine world — not an easy task,” Brito said.

“He took the time to walk through the policy language with me and ask the right questions. He was willing to put his trust in Marsh when we discussed changing the captive structure for cargo and was always extremely responsive.” &


AllStars2016v1oRisk All Stars stand out from their peers by overcoming challenges through exceptional problem solving, creativity, perseverance and passion.

See the complete list of 2016 Risk All Stars.

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Policy Haunts Halloween Attraction

A sunken haunted house attraction resulted in a lawsuit against the insurance broker.
By: | September 14, 2016 • 2 min read

It was a Halloween trick the theater company didn’t expect.

Between Oct. 31, 2014 and the following morning, the Foundation Theatre Group’s haunted house attraction on a floating stationary barge at Chicago’s Navy Pier sank during a storm.

A more disconcerting surprise came afterward: It discovered its commercial general liability insurer denied coverage.

The ghoul, according to the theater group, is their insurance brokerage, which they accuse of negligently failing to place insurance coverage that would “cover, among other things, storms and sinking,” according to a lawsuit filed on June 15.

Foundation Theatre Group sued New Lisbon, Wisc.-based Donat Insurance Services and Kenneth Donat, its director of special events, in U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois, seeking at least $1.5 million in damages.

The brokerage was instructed to protect the theater company “for possible losses to the barge, including marine and hull risks, protection and indemnity insurance, pollution liability insurance, crew insurance and excess insurance,” according to the lawsuit.


“Donat and Donat Insurance, acting as agents for Foundation, negligently failed to exercise the proper knowledge, skill and professional care of someone engaged in the business of procuring insurance policies … ,” the lawsuit alleged.

It noted that the brokerage “promotes themselves as ‘one of the best in the special events insurance industry,’ as someone a customer ‘can truly trust that knows the industry from the inside out,’ and as someone that can provide ‘the most comprehensive coverage available.’ ”

The sinking of the barge resulted in several different lawsuits, including one from Capitol Specialty Insurance Corp., which issued the CGL policy, seeking a court declaration that it does not need to provide a defense or indemnity to the theater group.

Donat’s attorney, Mitchell A. Orpett of Tribler Orpett & Meyer, said in an email that the brokerage denies any liability.

The litigation is “only one version of a complicated situation,” he said, and the theater group is “the target of several other companies who have attempted to blame Foundation and thereby escape their own responsibility and legal liability for the damages they caused at Navy Pier.”

He said the theater group’s lawsuit, “I am confident, [was] only reluctantly filed as a defense to the unwarranted claims of the others. I am confident as well that Foundation’s lawsuit will be resolved without any finding of liability against Mr. Donat or Donat Insurance Services.” &

Anne Freedman is managing editor of Risk & Insurance. She can be reached at [email protected]
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Sponsored Content by Nationwide

Hot Hacks That Leave You Cold

Cyber risk managers look at the latest in breaches and the future of cyber liability.
By: | October 3, 2016 • 5 min read

Nationwide_SponsoredContent_1016Thousands of dollars lost at the blink of an eye, and systems shut down for weeks. It might sound like something out of a movie, but it’s becoming more and more of a reality thanks to modern hackers. As technology evolves and becomes more sophisticated, so do the occurrence of cyber breaches.

“The more we rely on technology, the more everything becomes interconnected,” said Jackie Lee, associate vice president, Cyber Liability at Nationwide. “We are in an age where our car is a giant computer, and we can turn on our air conditioners with our phones. Everyone holds data. It’s everywhere.”

Phishing Out Fraud

According to Lee, phishing is on the rise as one of the most common forms of cyber attacks. What used to be easy to identify as fraudulent has become harder to distinguish. Gone are the days of the emails from the Nigerian prince, which have been replaced with much more sophisticated—and tricky—techniques that could extort millions.

“A typical phishing email is much more legitimate and plausible,” Lee said. “It could be an email appearing to be from human resources at annual benefits enrollment or it could be a seemingly authentic message from the CFO asking to release an invoice.”

According to Lee, the root of phishing is behavior and analytics. “Hackers can pick out so much from a person’s behavior, whether it’s a key word in an engagement survey or certain times when they are logging onto VPN.”

On the flip side, behavior also helps determine the best course of action to prevent phishing.

“When we send an exercise email to test how associates respond to phishing, we monitor who has clicked the first round, then a second round,” she said. “We look at repeat offenders and also determine if there is one exercise that is more susceptible. Once we understand that, we can take the right steps to make sure employees are trained to be more aware and recognize a potentially fraudulent email.”

Lee stressed that phishing can affect employees at all levels.

“When the exercise is sent out, we find that 20 percent of the opens are from employees at the executive level,” she said. “It’s just as important they are taking the right steps to ensure they are practicing what they are preaching.”

Locking Down Ransomware

Nationwide_SponsoredContent_1016Another hot hacking ploy is ransomware, a type of property-related cyber attack that prevents or limits users from accessing their system unless a ransom is paid. The average ransom request for a business is around $10,000. According to the FBI, there were 2,400 ransomware complaints in 2015, resulting in total estimated losses of more than $24 million. These threats are expected to increase by 300% this year alone.

“These events are happening, and businesses aren’t reporting them,” Lee said.

In the last five years, government entities saw the largest amount of ransomware attacks. Lee added that another popular target is hospitals.

After a recent cyber attack, a hospital in Los Angeles was without its crucial computer programs until it paid the hackers $17,000 to restore its systems.

Lee said there is beginning to be more industry-wide awareness around ransomware, and many healthcare organizations are starting to buy cyber insurance and are taking steps to safeguard their electronic files.

“A hospital holds an enormous amount of data, but there is so much more at stake than just the computer systems,” Lee said. “All their medical systems are technology-based. To lose those would be catastrophic.”

And though not all situations are life-or-death, Lee does emphasize that any kind of property loss could be crippling. “On a granular scale, you look at everything from your car to your security system. All data storage points could be controlled and compromised at some point.”

The Future of Cyber Liability

According to Lee, the Cyber product, which is still in its infancy, is poised to affect every line of business. She foresees underwriting offering more expertise in crime and becoming more segmented into areas of engineering, property, and automotive to address ongoing growing concerns.”

“Cyber coverage will become more than a one-dimensional product,” she said. “I see a large gap in coverage. Consistency is evolving, and as technology evolves, we are beginning to touch other lines. It’s no longer about if a breach will happen. It’s when.”

About Nationwide’s Cyber Solutions

Nationwide’s cyber liability coverage includes a service-based solution that helps mitigate losses. Whether it’s loss prevention resources, breach response and remediation expertise, or an experienced claim team, Nationwide’s comprehensive package of services will complement and enhance an organization’s cyber risk profile.

Nationwide currently offers up to $15 million in limits for Network Security, Data Privacy, Technology E&O, and First Party Business Interruption.

Products underwritten by Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company and Affiliated Companies. Not all Nationwide affiliated companies are mutual companies, and not all Nationwide members are insured by a mutual company. Subject to underwriting guidelines, review, and approval. Products and discounts not available to all persons in all states. Home Office: One Nationwide Plaza, Columbus, OH. Nationwide, the Nationwide N and Eagle, and other marks displayed on this page are service marks of Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company, unless otherwise disclosed. © 2016 Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company.



This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with Nationwide. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.

Nationwide, a Fortune 100 company, is one of the largest and strongest diversified insurance and financial services organizations in the U.S. and is rated A+ by both A.M. Best and Standard & Poor’s.
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