Employee Theft

Spotlight on Employee Theft

Report highlights damage done by employee theft and fraud to smaller employers.
By: | May 26, 2015 • 3 min read
Hand With Dollar Notes

Fraud costs the typical organization about 5 percent in revenue each year, and the median loss from employee theft overall is about $280,000. That amount is roughly equivalent to what a small company (less than 500 employees) earns in net profit.

“For these smaller employers, [employee theft] has the potential to knock them out,” said Doug Karpp, senior vice president and national underwriting leader, crime and fidelity, at Hiscox.

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And smaller employers are the most likely targets, according to a report recently released by the specialty insurer, “A Snapshot of Employee Theft in the U.S.”

An analysis of federal actions involving employee theft in 2014 showed that 72 percent of cases occurred at companies with fewer than 500 employees. Within that subset, 80 percent of incidents occurred at organizations with fewer than 100 employees, and more than half of those had fewer than 25 on staff.

“Smaller companies just don’t have the resources to have robust internal controls,” Karpp said. “They run lean. Losses tend to be more devastating to them.”

Fifty-eight percent of the cases surveyed for this report recovered none of their losses.

That finding isn’t surprising, but even larger entities with more protections in place are not immune. The financial services sector, for example, constituted 21 percent of employee theft incidences. The second-most targeted industry was real estate and construction at 13 percent.

Despite reporting the largest share of employee thefts, however, the median loss for financial services institutions was less than the overall median at $271,000.

“The financial services sector has more resources to detect and deter fraud,” Karpp said.

While the retail industry suffered only 5 percent of total fraud cases, it sustained the highest median loss of $606,012. That may partially be due to “idiosyncrasies with the way the study was done,” Karpp said.

Federal Court Cases Studied

The report examined only federal court cases, and retailers may very likely encounter many smaller thefts — especially outright theft of funds — that are handled at a local level and thus would not be counted in this study. Those that do get federal attention are more likely to be very large, more complicated losses.

The most common types of theft were outright funds theft (38 percent of losses) and check fraud (34 percent) — when a fraudster alters, forges or makes checks payable to himself.

Or rather, herself. Women were the perpetrators in more than 60 percent of cases, especially outright funds theft and payroll fraud. However, the median loss from schemes carried out by women was about $243,447 — 30 percent less than their male counterparts, who typically committed vendor fraud. Hiscox’s report defines vendor fraud as “a perpetrator diverting employer funds through the creation and submission of false invoices issued by fictitious companies.”

The typical thief was also around 50 years of age and worked in a senior level position in an accounting or finance role, typically with a long tenure.

Many employers miss signs of fraud because they believe their employees to be content in their jobs and generally trustworthy. In fact, according to Karpp, upticks in fraud — or at least its discovery — tend to happen during poor economic times, which may drive employees to divert extra funds to themselves, and also motivate employers to look more closely at their accounting processes

“One goal of the report is to raise awareness of fraud prevention techniques” during good times and bad, Karpp said, explaining that even companies with tight margins can adopt simple practices to mitigate the risk of employee theft.

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Best practices include keeping certain tasks separate, such as record-keeping, issuing checks and reconciling bank accounts; no individual employee should be in charge of an accounting process from start to finish. Any checks written or wire transfers should receive approval from two senior managers or executives before completed.

Small business owners can also have all statements sent to their homes to be personally reviewed before any accounts are reconciled.

Many companies also wrongfully assume that traditional business and property policies cover internal theft. Fifty-eight percent of the cases surveyed for this report recovered none of their losses.

Having a crime policy in place that includes coverage for losses caused by through cyber deception, social engineering, vendor theft, funds transfer fraud, computer fraud, telephone toll fraud and other types of theft is the best way to ensure that road to recovery exists.

Katie Siegel is a staff writer at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at ksiegel@lrp.com.
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Opportunities in Cuba

Greenberg on Cuba

The easing of travel restrictions to Cuba is bound to open up opportunities.
By: | May 6, 2015 • 3 min read
Havana

On a visit to Moscow in 1964, Hank Greenberg noticed a picture of a Havana office building on the desk of an official with the Soviet insurance company Ingosstrakh.

“That looks like the building where my company housed its insurance operations,” Greenberg — who was in Moscow seeking a travel risk reinsurance deal — told the official.

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The C.V. Starr Companies had an office in Havana – pictured above – between 1943 and 1958.

“That may be,” the Soviet official replied. “Now it is the building where Ingosstrakh houses the Soviet Union’s Cuban operations,” he added.

“Please take care of that building,” Greenberg told the official. “We will get it back … soon.”

More than 50 years after Greenberg made that bold statement, as recounted in his 2013 book “The AIG Story,” the day that Starr Companies takes possession of its former property in Havana is not yet here.

“Change must come about, but how fast? I can’t answer that.” – Hank Greenberg, CEO and Chairman of the Starr Companies.

With the recent easing of travel restrictions to Cuba by the U.S. government, however, Starr Companies’ executives are checking on the condition and ownership of the building just the same.

Untangling the history of that Havana building is just one of the opportunities that are on the minds of business people in the United States since travel restrictions to Cuba were eased in January.

Greenberg expresses the hope that his company can one day re-open an insurance operation in Havana. At the same time, Greenberg said that there is much work yet to be done, on the part of both the public and the private sector, before anything like that can happen.

“Both governments have got to agree on the speed by which normalization would come into being,” Greenberg said.

Hank Greenberg CEO and Chairman Starr Companies

Hank Greenberg
CEO and Chairman
Starr Companies

Since the restrictions were eased, Greenberg reports that the Starr Companies’ travel services subsidiary Assist-Card International Holdings, which it acquired in 2011, is already seeing an uptick in inquiries from businesspeople interested in its travel protection services in Cuba.

“From what we can discern, there is a great deal of interest and a pent-up need to travel,” Greenberg said.

The hotel and restaurant business, agriculture and travel-related industries like cruise shipping and aviation are just a few of the industries that will see opportunities in nearby Cuba as relationships between that country and the United States open up.

There will also be an intense interest, Greenberg said, for people of Cuban descent who are United States citizens eager to visit their origin country.

However, more evolution in government relations must occur before many of those dreams can become a reality.

“Change must come about, but how fast? I can’t answer that,” Greenberg said.

One thing Greenberg is certain of. Free trade is the quickest route to building lasting bonds between the United States and Cuba.

“I think that where trade increases between countries generally you see change in attitudes and building better trust between countries. You learn from each other, it’s a faster way to normalize relations than anything I can think of,” Greenberg said.

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Greenberg stressed that Assist-Card International isn’t the only U.S.-based insurance company or subsidiary in the travel risk business.

The Starr chairman indicated though that he expects his company to be a strong competitor.

“The challenges of doing business in Cuba are substantial,” Greenberg said.

“But Starr is well-positioned and prepared to leverage our relationships and global network to support our clients’ entry into this market.”

Dan Reynolds is editor-in-chief of Risk & Insurance. He can be reached at dreynolds@lrp.com.
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Sponsored Content by CorVel

RIMS Recap: Tech Trends that Could Change Everything

The future is here, and emerging technology is transforming the landscape of workers' compensation.
By: | May 8, 2015 • 5 min read
SponsoredContent_CorVel

Last month, Gordon Clemons, CEO and Chairman of CorVel Corporation, presented at the RIMS Conference in New Orleans, La. about emerging technology and how it is impacting risk management and workers’ compensation. The discussion served as a springboard for new insights on how technology will change the industry, and reaffirmed the need for integrated systems and human interaction for the best results.

The presentation noted the future is here – and technology is constantly evolving in hopes of outpacing tomorrow’s needs. As these technology platforms become more inherent in daily life, the gap in translating their utilization to workers’ compensation will begin to close.

Technology in Healthcare

Gordon Clemons, CEO and Chairman, CorVel Corporation

While many consumer-based technology advancements exist in other industries, perhaps most notably in the retail space helping vendors to reduce various delays in the sales experience, people may forget that healthcare, too, is a consumer industry. And as such, healthcare also experiences workflow lags, which can be collapsed.

While patients and claims may not lend themselves as freely to mobile applications and technology that subscribes to the “Internet of Things” philosophy, the rapid rate of development foretells the not-too-far-off arrival of the “a-ha,” “wow factor”-type application that consumers are seeking in the healthcare industry.

Once we get there, we can only expect that the Pangea of resources will yield better outcomes. The potential impact to medical management includes more affordable/accessible healthcare, patient convenience, personal assistance, automatic inputs to claims systems and less administration from both patients and injured workers.

“Healthcare is stubborn about change. There are more data points in healthcare and there is a greater need for high quality and accuracy,” Clemons said.

SponsoredContent_CorVel

Tech Trends for the Next Digital Decade

As an industry advocate in all things innovation, CorVel has been keeping tabs on emerging tech trends. As they begin to influence in other industries, it sparks the question – will they eventually change workers’ compensation?

Here are some of the trends on CorVel’s radar:

Wearables

Smart phones and tablets were the first mobile devices to really start to gain traction across people’s personal lives. Since then, wearables (like Fitbits and smart watches) have been part of the next digital generation to be taken up by consumers.

As these personal devices quickly advance, wearables could offer payors and employers added insight into the wellness of claimants through the extent of their retrievable data.

Beacons

Beacons are devices that use low-energy Bluetooth connections to communicate messages or triggers directly to a smart device (such as a phone or tablet). Retailers have started using this technology, sending offers to near-by consumers’ phones. Now the concepts of smart mirrors and smart walls offer a one-stop-shop with recommendations related to the preferences of the shopper – making a hyper-efficient business model. It is possible that we could see these devices adapted to being a catalyst for healthcare’s business model by reducing the delays of administrative work.

Drones

Formally known as unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV), drones can be remote-controlled or flown autonomously through pre-defined flight plans within their internal systems. Some carriers are testing the use of drones to potentially be used to evaluate property damage and responding to natural disasters.

Telemedicine

As most injuries reported in workers’ compensation are musculoskeletal injuries, the industry lends itself well to the benefits of telecommunications and telemedicine. With the rise of electronic capabilities, telemedicine becomes another option to help guide an injured worker through their entire episode of care, reducing time delays.

In order to get to that point in time, implementing these trends (and those that are yet to be launched) will only be as successful as the population willing to accept them. Buy-in will require a commitment to the long-standing pillars of the industry. According to Clemons, “While technology can truly move the needle in workers’ compensation, it will take more than bells and whistles to maximize its impact.”

“People’s feelings are valid. The skepticism surrounding new technology is not misplaced, but neither is the enthusiasm,” Clemons said.

New Trends, Same Priorities

SponsoredContent_CorVelBeyond the buzzwords and hype surrounding the latest apps and devices, for new technology to succeed within the workers’ compensation realm, it boils down to the two primary concepts that drive the industry to begin with – effective infrastructure and a people-first philosophy.

The power of applicable resources and the actionable data that results from them is in the foundation of the systems themselves; that primarily being through the influence of integration. It is not a new concept; however, as technology advances and the reach of analytic capabilities broadens, it is important to find a provider that can harness this data and channel it into effective workflows to increase efficiencies and promote better outcomes.

CorVel’s proprietary claims management system has been developed and supported by an in-house, full-time information systems division to be intuitive and user-friendly. Complex, proprietary algorithms link codified data across the system, facilitating collaboration between services, workflows, customers, and technology and eliminating the risk that a crucial piece of information will be missed. The result is an active “ecosystem” providing customers with actionable data to provide the most accurate, comprehensive picture at any time, while also collapsing inherent delays.

For the injured worker, the critical human touch connection in the workers’ compensation process can never be minimized. By cutting lag time throughout the various inefficiencies underlying the industry’s workflows, CorVel can connect injured workers with quality care sooner. As systems advance, claims and managed care associates do not have to spend as much time on administrative work and will instead be able to devote more time to the injured workers, reviving the human touch aspect that is just as impactful within the industry.

Regardless of the technology that lies ahead, CorVel looks to the future with investments in innovation, while not losing sight of their role and responsibility to clients and patients. Dedicated to constant improvement for the services they provide injured workers and industry payors, CorVel is committed to improving industry services one app, click, drone (or whatever is yet to come) at a time – perhaps something to discuss in San Diego at next year’s RIMS conference.

For more information, visit corvel.com.

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This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with CorVel Corporation. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.




CorVel is a national provider of risk management solutions for employers, third party administrators, insurance companies and government agencies seeking to control costs and promote positive outcomes.
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