Public Sector

Upgrading America’s Infrastructure

Climate change is speeding the deterioration of an already aged system. The fix will cost trillions.
By: | June 1, 2015 • 8 min read
** FILE ** Construction crews work to repair a 36 inch water main break that crumbled pavement and sent thousands of gallons of rushing water onto a major city street turning it into what looked like a small lake, in this file photo of Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2008, on the north side of Chicago. It was not clear what caused the 80-year-old cast-iron main to break, but engineers say we are in a crucial era for the nation's infrastructure, especially in older cities where some pipes and tunnels were built more than a century ago, and are now nearing the end of their life expectancies. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green, File)

D+. That’s the grade assigned to the overall quality of America’s infrastructure by the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). Just one notch above failure.

ASCE’s economic report on surface transportation, released in July 2011, reported that deteriorating infrastructure will cost the American economy more than 876,000 jobs and suppress the growth of GDP by $897 billion by the year 2020.

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Bad infrastructure has a cascading effect on the economy. Lack of capacity and poor road conditions lead to backups and bottlenecks.

That means products sitting in trucks aren’t reaching their destinations in a timely and efficient manner. Commuters are wasting time and fuel sitting in traffic. The cost in wasted fuel and lost productivity is staggering.

“The Federal Highway Administration calculates that highway bottlenecks cause more than 243 million hours of trucking delays each year, costing $7.8 billion.

When shipping takes longer, businesses have to reorient their supply chains and rely on more distribution centers, adding more costs,” said Mark Brockinton, managing director, transportation and logistics practice at Aon.

“In 2011, traffic congestion caused American commuters to purchase an extra $2.9 billion in fuel, costing more than $120 billion in added fuel costs and wasted time.”

The effects of climate change and increasingly severe weather only further constrain traffic flow and worsen road conditions.

“If you look at the severe winter we had in the Northeast, that created a lot of wear and tear on our roads and bridges,” said Andy Herrmann, past president of the ASCE.

“They had to put a lot of de-icing material down to combat that, but that salt mixes with water and accelerates the corrosion of steel and gets into the concrete and starts corroding the reinforcing bars. And when steel corrodes, it expands seven to eight times its volume. So when you look at a bridge deck or a roadway surface and you see a pothole, that’s those reinforcing bars expanding and pushing against the concrete.”

Steve Bojan, vice president of fleet risk services for HUB International, added, “When you talk about climate change and harsh weather, you look at the Northeast and it wreaks havoc. [This past winter] was horrible. All bets were off on everything. Roads, whole cities, interstates were shut down. So you end up backing everything up for days, and at some point, some goods and services are just not produced. It’s in the billions of dollars a day in activity that can’t be done.”

“People are starting to understand that when they rebuild their infrastructure, they have to do it to a new standard.” — Erik Johanson, manager of strategic planning and analysis, SEPTA

Federal and state governments are taking steps to improve infrastructure, especially after Superstorm Sandy demonstrated that the effects of climate change can literally bring major cities to a standstill and incur huge costs.

In 2011, the Federal Transit Administration selected seven transit agencies across the country as part of a pilot program to conduct risk and vulnerability assessments of their systems and create plans for climate change adaptation.

After Sandy, it doled out capital funding to help turn some of those plans into reality.

In Philadelphia, the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA) received $87 million to fund seven projects it developed during the pilot program phase.

The authority’s regional rail system in particular has been taking a beating.

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Erik Johanson, manager of strategic planning and analysis, SEPTA

“We did a pre-screening process to determine the most vulnerable points in our system, and the Manayunk/Norristown line, which parallels the Schuylkill River pretty close to the level of the river, has flooded 13 times since 2003, out of a total of 21 recorded flood events in history,” said Erik Johanson, manager of strategic planning and analysis.

“So more than 50 percent of recorded flood events that have occurred on that line have happened since 2003.”

While plans focus on flood mitigation and shoreline stabilization, improving the system’s resiliency will also involve building a backup control center and power systems, and insulating bare copper wires that can easily trip and cause signal failure.

In general, extreme temperature changes and powerful storms make any transit system vulnerable to failure.

“For heat, the big things are track buckling and sagging wires, which have major impacts,” Johanson said.

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“Once it reaches 90 degrees, we have to slow the trains down, so it has service impacts.”

Snow, ice and strong winds can also lead to downed power lines, damage to signal systems and other equipment, and labor workforce issues associated with snow removal.

“People are starting to understand that when they rebuild their infrastructure, they have to do it to a new standard,” he said.

Building in Resiliency

That new standard may include building with new materials and technologies.
According to the ASCE’s Herrmann, “The University of Michigan came out with a concrete that can take some tension. Concrete is a compressive material, but if it can take tension, it can prevent it from forming the little cracks that allow salty water to get into it and start the corrosion cycle.”

Monitoring devices can also be built into bridges to track ground movement.

“When it comes to settlements of soil or ground movements, those things can change just due to small gradual movements, but can also be drastic. It has impact on the stability of a structure,” said Guido Benz, head of engineering and construction at Swiss Re Corporate Solutions.

“Structural elements today have more up-to-date monitoring tools that can be built in during construction, which was not the case in the ‘50s. — Guido Benz, head of engineering and construction, Swiss Re Corporate Solutions

“Structural elements today have more up-to-date monitoring tools that can be built in during construction, which was not the case in the ‘50s.”

When bad weather strikes, lower salt and salt-free mixtures can also be used on roadways to melt ice. There are also new high-performance forms of concrete and steel, which are less permeable, more resistant to corrosion, and higher strength.

“But those things come with a cost,” Herrmann said. “State departments of transportation have hard decisions to make — what to do with limited dollars. Do they do maintenance, repairs or replacements with new structures? Maintenance can get put off, and it just gets more expensive the longer you put it off.”

By Bojan’s estimates, “It’s probably at least 20 years to uncork this. These projects are all very long term and take a lot of planning.”

Critical infrastructure may also be delayed due to lack of will.

“Infrastructure is not sexy, for lack of a better word,” Bojan said.

“People are much more likely to want a park on the lakefront. They’ll spend $150 million for that, but to spend $100 million for a viaduct, for example, they react negatively.”

Finding Funding

Lack of funds is another primary reason that necessary upkeep and upgrades to transportation infrastructure have not been made.

Guido Benz, head of engineering and construction, Swiss Re Corporate Solutions

Guido Benz, head of engineering and construction, Swiss Re Corporate Solutions

“Investments needed are in the billions of dollars. They’re massive numbers. The big question is: Where will the funds come from?” Benz said. The ASCE estimates it will take a $3.6 trillion investment by 2020 to bring the many components of America’s infrastructure up to an acceptable standard, and that total could increase if higher-strength, weather-resilient tools and materials are considered.

The federal government may invest in rebuilding efforts after a disaster, but these long-term projects need a steady stream of capital for maintenance.

Public-private partnerships (PPPs) are one way to attract investors to costly infrastructure projects.

“Models that bring in private investors but also involve project parties in long-term operational contracts generate revenue to maintain the structure. Achieving proper maintenance and keeping infrastructure upgraded is the critical element,” Benz said.

“In times of financial difficulty, maintenance gets cut short, so the quality will decay over time. So the benefit of the PPP approach is that the upkeep as well as the operations of the infrastructure is outsourced, and that presents a business opportunity for the private parties. From the investor’s point-of-view, it’s attractive because they can make a profit off of tolls, for example, and sell the property back when their contract is over.”

Other experts say a fuel tax increase is necessary to move projects forward at a steady pace. As vehicles have grown more fuel-efficient, the fuel tax percentage has remained static, meaning that more miles are being driven while fewer funds are collected. The revenue can’t keep up with the demand for repairs, upgrades and maintenance.

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“The fuel tax needs to be raised an additional 40 cents to a total of 65 cents. The federal diesel tax hasn’t changed since 1993,” said Aon’s Brockinton.

“The American Trucking Association actually is pushing for higher taxes now,” HUB’s Bojan said.

“Freight is good, profits are up, and they’re saying, ‘We need to improve our lanes and infrastructure so we can improve our throughput, otherwise we’re just getting clobbered by constraints.’ ”

Planning for the Storm

The Environmental Protection Agency predicts that unless greenhouse gas emissions decrease substantially, temperatures will continue to climb, the world’s oceans will become more acidic and the frequency of severe storms and precipitation levels will increase.

Failure to address the risks to infrastructure will not only worsen congestion, but threaten to totally shut down transit if roads, bridges and rails become too dangerous to use. Safety also becomes a major issue.

Mark Brockinton, managing director, transportation and logistics practice, Aon

Mark Brockinton, managing director, transportation and logistics practice, Aon

“Certain insurance companies have products insuring against a loss a company might have within the transportation infrastructure, such as a port delay, local embargo, or a natural disaster,” Brockinton said.

“The products would include business interruption, contingent business interruption, trade disruption, political risk, logistics insurance.

Certain companies will insure risks without an actual loss of product under certain circumstances, which would include a delay or non-delivery of product due to a strike or natural catastrophe.

“A well-performing transportation network keeps jobs in America. It allows businesses to expand, and it allows businesses to manage their inventories and transport goods more cheaply and efficiently.”

Benz of Swiss Re said companies should view infrastructure failure as an “operational risk,” and mitigate it by building redundancies into their supply and delivery chains. As harsh weather presents an ever-growing challenge, it becomes more and more important for risk managers to “always have a Plan B ready to go.”

Katie Siegel is a staff writer at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]
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Crisis Management

Dealing with Civil Unrest

In the aftermath of riots, urban-based companies are strengthening contingency plans to protect their facilities, and most importantly, their employees.
By: | May 6, 2015 • 4 min read
Fire on the street

Retailers and other companies across the country are looking for a Plan B in the wake of riots that destroyed stores in Ferguson, Mo. and now Baltimore.

Meanwhile, carriers might seek to recover their losses from damage and business disruption claims by suing cities that tell their police to stand down to give space to protesters who “wished to destroy.” What’s unknown at this point is whether carriers would prevail.

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Companies need to develop contingency plans specific for each location to manage events such as riots, as well as situations that could lead to them and the resulting consequences, said Sean Ahrens, security consulting services practice leader for Aon Global Risk Consulting in Chicago.

A key part of such planning includes determining under what circumstances onsite managers or a crisis management team should close retail locations.

“Now is also the time to review contingency plans to understand what other locations can be used during a time of unrest, as well as making sure companies that supply goods to them have alternative ways to make their goods available.” — Lance Becker, vice chairman, Northeast region, Arthur J. Gallagher & Co.

“Organizations that have robust plans and contingencies may actually have shelter in place to protect employees during civil unrest,” Ahrens said.

“But if a company has no policies or procedures in place, then in the worst case scenario, they should close the store and evacuate. Ultimately, a company’s duty of care is to protect their employees from all hazards.”

Post-event, companies should also provide counseling for employees who were caught up in a riot, though a lot of them might not want to come back, he said.

Tracy Knippenburg Gillis, global reputational risk and crisis management leader for Marsh Risk Consulting in New York City, said there are a lot of factors that determine when to close a facility, such as whether it serves a critical function in the community, or whether employees would lose needed income if the store closed prematurely during peaceful protests.

“Most organizations should have their crisis management teams on alert, if not actively engaged, monitoring and potentially making decisions on delayed openings or closures over the course of events,” Gillis said.

“They should be communicating to employees what they are doing and ideally monitoring what authorities are doing, so they can make the right judgment at the right time.”

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Marsh has several clients in retail, hospitality and other entertainment-related industries that were impacted in last month’s Baltimore riots. Several suffered business disruptions due to curfews imposed by the city, said Bob O’Brien, a managing director in Marsh’s national claims practice in Washington, D.C.

“Companies should practice situational awareness,” O’Brien said.

“They have to go through several steps continuously, identifying exposures to the company and their supply chain. They should be aware of what’s going on all around them that could potentially impact them if they are caught up in a freeze zone or a closure zone.”

Companies should also review their insurance coverage to make sure they have the proper terms, limits and retention, he said. After an event, they should apply all possible triggers that could impact a claim, whether direct damage or civil authority that results in service interruption and ingress/egress issues.

Companies should make sure to secure documents to better ensure payment of their claims, he said.

Arthur J. Gallagher & Co. also had clients that suffered losses and filed claims as a result of the upheaval in Baltimore, said Lance Becker, vice chairman, Northeast region in New York City.

Becker said the recent riots that impacted area businesses serve as “an education” for companies to make sure their insurance policies cover “civil authority and unrest,” which would pay for either physical damage or losses for not being able to gain entry to the store.

“Now is also the time to review contingency plans to understand what other locations can be used during a times of unrest, as well as making sure companies that supply goods to them have alternative ways to make their good available,” he said.

Carriers might seek to recoup their losses by suing Baltimore, as several news outlets have reported that the police there were ordered to “stand down” and not prevent rioters from looting, burning or destroying stores, including a CVS pharmacy and an Ace Cash Express store.

Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake denied there was a stand down order, and she also told “Meet the Press” last Sunday that she regretted saying in an earlier press conference that space was given to protesters who “wished to destroy.”

Terrence Graves, a shareholder at Sands Anderson PC law firm in Richmond, Va., said that any city that experiences civil unrest might have sovereign immunity for those sorts of actions dealing with the police force.

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“If a city government — like any other governmental entity — takes action within what is considered its governmental sphere, such as making political decisions, as opposed to its proprietary sphere such as providing water services or maintaining city streets, then a city might have governmental immunity,” Graves said.

“There is an interesting test that most courts would run though in order to determine whether the city was acting as a government or as a landlord.”

Katie Kuehner-Hebert is a freelance writer based in California. She has more than two decades of journalism experience and expertise in financial writing. She can be reached at [email protected]
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Sponsored: Liberty International Underwriters

Detention Risks Grow for Traveling Employees

Employees traveling abroad face new abduction risks that are more difficult to resolve than a ransom-based kidnapping.
By: | June 1, 2015 • 6 min read
LIU_BrandedContent

It used to be that most kidnapping events were driven by economic motives. The bad guys kidnapped corporate employees and then demanded a ransom.

These situations are always very dangerous and serious. But the bad guys’ profit motive helps ensure the safety of their hostages in order to collect a ransom.

Recently, an even more dangerous trend has emerged. Governments, insurgents and terrorist organizations are abducting employees not to make money, but to gain notoriety or for political reasons.

Without a ransom demand, an involuntarily confined person is referred to as ‘detained.’ Each detention event requires a specialized approach to try and negotiate the safe return of the hostage, depending on the ideology or motivation of the abductors.

And the risk is not just faced by global corporations but by companies of all sizes.

LIU_BrandedContent“The world is changing. We see many more occasions where governments are getting involved in detentions and insurgent/terrorist groups are growing in size and scope. It’s the right time for a discussion about detention risks.”

— Tom Dunlap, Assistant Vice President, Liberty International Underwriters (LIU)

“Practically any company with employees traveling abroad or operations overseas can be a target for a detention risk,” said Tom Dunlap, assistant vice president at Liberty International Underwriters (LIU). “Whether you are setting up a foreign operation, sourcing raw materials or equipment overseas, or trying to establish an overseas sales contract, people are traveling everywhere today for so many reasons.”

Emerging Threats Driven By New Groups Using New Tools

Many of the groups who pose the most dangerous detention threats are well versed in how to use the Internet and social media for PR, recruiting and communication. ISIS, for example, generates worldwide publicity with their gruesome videos that are distributed through multiple electronic channels.

Bad guys leverage their digital skills to identify companies and their employees who conduct business overseas. Corporate websites and personal social media often provide enough information to target employees who are working abroad.

LIU_BrandedContentAnd if executives are too well protected to abduct, these tools can also be used to identify and target family members who may be less well protected.

The explosion of new groups who pose the most dangerous risks are generally classified into three categories:

Insurgents – Detentions by these groups are most often intended to keep a government or humanitarian group from delivering services or aid to certain populations, usually in a specific territory, for political reasons. They also take hostages to make a political statement and, on occasion, will ask for a ransom.

In other cases, insurgent groups detain aid workers in order to provide the aid themselves (to win over locals to their cause). They also attempt prisoner swaps by offering to trade their hostages for prisoners held by the government.

The most dangerous groups include FARC (Colombia), ISIS (Syria and Iraq), Boko Haram (Nigeria), Taliban (Pakistan and Afghanistan) and Al Shabab (Somalia).

Governments – Often use detention as a way to hide illegal or suspect activities. In Iran, an American woman was working with Iranian professors to organize a cultural exchange program for Iranian students. Without notice, she was arrested and accused of subversion to overthrow the government. In a separate incident, a journalist was thrown in jail for not presenting proper credentials when he entered the country.

“Government allegations against detainees vary but in most cases are unfounded or untrue,” said Dunlap. “Often these detentions are attempts to prevent the monitoring of elections or conducting inspections.”

Even local city and town governments present an increased detention risk. In one recent case, a local manager of a foreign company was arrested in order to try and force a favorable settlement in a commercial dispute.

Ideology-driven terrorists – Extremist groups such as Boko Haram and ISIS are grabbing most of today’s headlines with their public displays of ultra-violence and unwillingness to compromise. The threat from these groups is particularly dangerous because their motives are based on pure ideology and, at the same time, they seek media exposure as a recruiting tool.

These groups don’t care who they abduct — journalist, aid worker, student or private employee – they just need hostages.

“The main idea here is to shock people and show how governments and businesses are powerless to protect their citizens and employees,” observed Dunlap.

Mitigating the Risks

LIU_BrandedContentEven if no ransom demands are made, an LIU kidnap and ransom policy will deliver benefits to employers and their employees encountering a detention scenario.

For instance, the policy provides a hostage’s family with salary continuation for the duration of their captivity. For a family who’s already dealing with the terror of abduction, ensuring financial stability is an important benefit.

In addition, coverage provides for security for the family if they, too, may be at risk. It also pays for travel and accommodations if the family, employees or consultants need to travel to the detention location. Then there are potential medical and psychological care costs for the employee when they are released as well as litigation defense costs for the company.

LIU coverage also includes expert consultant and response services from red24, a leading global crisis management assistance firm. Even without a ransom negotiation to manage, the services of expert consultants are vital.

“We have witnessed a marked increase in wrongful detentions involving the business traveler. In some regions of the world wrongful detentions are referred to as “business kidnappings.” The victim is often held against their will because of a business dispute. Assisting a client who falls victim to such a scheme requires an experienced crisis management consultant,” said Jack Cloonan, head of special risks for red24.

Without coverage, the fees for experienced consultants can run as high as $3,000 per day.

Pre-Travel Planning

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Given the growing threat, it is more important than ever to be well versed about the country your company is working in. Threats vary by region and country. For example, in some locales safety dictates to always call for a cab instead of hailing one off the street. And in other countries it is never safe to use public transportation.

LIU’s coverage includes thorough pre-travel services, which are free of charge. As part of that effort, LIU makes its crisis consultants available to collaborate with insureds on potential exposures ahead of time.

Every insured employee traveling or working overseas can access vital information from the red24 website. The site contains information on individual countries or regions and what a traveler needs to know in terms of security/safety threats, documents to help avoid detention, and even medical information about risks such as pandemics, etc.

“Anyone who is a risk manager, security director, CFO or an HR leader has to think about the detention issue when they are about to send people abroad or establish operations overseas,” Dunlap said. “The world is changing. We see many more occasions where governments are getting involved in detentions and insurgent/terrorist groups are growing in size and scope. It’s the right time for a discussion about detention risks.”

For more information about the benefits LIU kidnap and ransom policies offer, please visit the website or contact your broker.

Liberty International Underwriters is the marketing name for the broker-distributed specialty lines business operations of Liberty Mutual Insurance. Certain coverage may be provided by a surplus lines insurer. Surplus lines insurers do not generally participate in state guaranty funds and insureds are therefore not protected by such funds. This literature is a summary only and does not include all terms, conditions, or exclusions of the coverage described. Please refer to the actual policy issued for complete details of coverage and exclusions.

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This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with Liberty International Underwriters. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.




LIU is part of the Global Specialty Division of Liberty Mutual Insurance.
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