Health Care Costs

Corporations Unite to Lower Health Care Costs

A new agreement among large U.S. corporations may alter how health care service providers operate.
By: | May 31, 2016 • 2 min read
Pills and Bills

A new agreement to share health care coverage information among some of the largest U.S. corporations – a sweeping effort to reduce surging medical costs – may potentially alter how administration service providers, such as brokers and pharmacy benefit managers, operate.

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Known as the Health Transformation Alliance (HTA), the collective seeks to improve how companies provide health coverage and make the current multilayered supply chain more efficient.

The 20 companies involved include Macy’s Inc., American Express Co., and The Coca-Cola Co. Between them, they spend more than $14 billion annually on combined health care for 4 million people, including employees, their dependents and retirees, according to the HTA website.

The HTA’s first pilot projects are expected to launch in 2017 and will help employees obtain more affordable prescription medications. The rest of the major initiatives are planned for 2018 or later. The alliance has not yet indicated how they expect to reduce costs for prescriptions.

Chris Duncan, chief growth officer at EPIC Insurance Brokers and Consultants.

Chris Duncan, chief growth officer at EPIC Insurance Brokers and Consultants.

“This isn’t necessarily a totally new concept; it’s one that is timely and probably pretty smart,” said Chris Duncan, chief growth officer at EPIC Insurance Brokers and Consultants.

Duncan was a casualty analyst at Ford Motor Co. in the mid-1980s when the automotive company formed an alliance with dozens of other large corporations to help solve the U.S. liability insurance crisis. The companies in the alliance eventually formed XL Group plc. and ACE to provide product liability and D&O coverage.

“This is a continuation of what large employers have been doing for some time; consolidating purchasing powers and business driver insights,” Duncan said.

“I think it’s doable to bind together 20 companies and probably get a better deal than having the PBM in the middle.”

Since the inititative is still in preliminary stages, it is uncertain what changes the collaboration may bring to the corporations or the administration companies serving them.

“We are looking for innovators in the supply chain, the pioneers who want to break from the status quo and work with the group of pioneering employers who want to build a better way.” —  The Health Transformation Alliance

“We hope to hear from the supply chain about how it can work with us to recast a system that everyone agrees needs to be improved,” the HTA said.

“We are looking for innovators in the supply chain, the pioneers who want to break from the status quo and work with the group of pioneering employers who want to build a better way.”

Suppliers are also trying to understand how the alliance may change their roles.

“This could be a revenue generating opportunity for Aon, but it will likely take revenue out of the market for smaller brokerage firms,” said Alex Michon, senior vice president with Aon Risk Solutions.

Alex Michon, senior vice president with Aon Risk Solutions.

Alex Michon, senior vice president with Aon Risk Solutions.

If corporations decide to cut out insurance buying, they may save broker commissions and that could reduce fees, Michon said. But large brokers usually play a dual role in helping obtain insurance plans as well as offering risk and compliance consulting services.

“With the right data and right analysis you could do some interesting things,” said EPIC’s Duncan.

For example, the companies could negotiate a national disease management program for diabetes or cardiac care.

“Literally 20 percent of your employee population will drive 70 percent of your costs so you can concentrate that intervention in a fewer number of partner or vendor intervention points,” Duncan said.

According to its website htahealth.com, the HTA plans to “facilitate contracting opportunities between members of the Alliance and service providers.”

Members will then contract directly with the service provider. The Alliance said it will not receive funds from these contracts or bear legal responsibility for the service provider’s performance under the contract.

“We have considerable work to do, and we expect this will take years to fully implement,” said

Bill Allen, the CHRO of Macy’s Inc. said,  in announcing the Alliance.

“This is a major undertaking for each of us, but if we don’t do it now, the growth in health care costs will overwhelm all of us. We are proud to be pioneers who seek to transform and improve the way health care benefits are provided for millions of working Americans.”

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“There’s a crisis in medical care and the biggest companies are bringing together their purchasing power to find solutions,” Duncan said.

“I wish them a whole lot of luck because what we’re doing now just isn’t working. We should all watch them carefully.”

The members of the Alliance are:

American Express Co.

American Water

BNSF Railway Co.

Brunswick Corp.

Caterpillar Inc.

The Coca-Cola Co.

E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Co. 

HCA Inc.

The Hartford Financial Services Group Inc.

IBM Corp. Ingersoll Rand

International Paper Co.

Lincoln Financial Group

Macy’s Inc.

Marriott International Inc.

NextEra Energy Inc.

Pitney Bowes Inc.

Shell Oil Co.

Verizon Communications Inc.

Weyerhaeuser Co.

Juliann Walsh is a staff writer at Risk & Insurance. She can be reached at [email protected]
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Brokerage

Thoughtful Chemistry

The leaders of Willis Towers Watson discuss their hopes for the newly combined organization.
By: | May 24, 2016 • 5 min read
Lloyd`s of London

As they discuss their “merger of equals,” John Haley and Dominic Casserley emphasize a willingness to let the chemistry between their two legacy organizations develop naturally, rather than through top-down directives.

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Haley, CEO of the newly created Willis Towers Watson, and Casserley, the company’s deputy CEO and president, sat down with Risk & Insurance® at the RIMS convention in San Diego to talk about the progress of their company since the Willis/Towers Watson merger was completed in January.

The merger combined a benefits firm with a global large cap network — Towers Watson — with Willis, which had a strong large cap presence in commercial property/casualty insurance broking globally, but was best known as a middle market player in the United States.

“When Dominic and I were sitting down and talking about this, we thought the real prize is if we can create an environment where we have people working together and where we think of ourselves as an integrated firm,” said Haley, a Rutgers University mathematics major who rose up the ranks from the early roots of the Towers Watson organization in 1977.

John Haley, CEO, Willis Towers Watson

John Haley, CEO, Willis Towers Watson

Sure, the two leaders talk to their teams about their talent mix and the business opportunities the merger presents.

But since the firms merged in January, Haley and Casserley say they have been happy to let members of the two legacy firms reach out to one another, to start solving customer challenges together under their own steam and see how they gel as teammates.

He reiterated that point in a May 6 WTW earnings call with analysts.

“As I travel to the various offices and see firsthand the collaborative sales efforts and hear about our market success, it’s clear our colleagues are not waiting for a top-down integration mandate or reporting tools to go to market,” Haley said.

“We don’t know exactly what all the new capabilities, the new products and services are going to be,” Casserley said in San Diego in April.

“We do know that we are creating a unique organization, which is truly global and which is integrated as opposed to operating in silos,” said Casserley, a University of Cambridge graduate who before the Towers Watson marriage oversaw the completion of Willis’ acquisition of the large French brokerage Gras Savoye and its 3,900 colleagues at the end of 2015.

Willis bought its first stake in Gras Savoye back in 1995, taking a third of the French firm at that point in time.

The Relevance of Scale

Both men lead firms with a history of making big deals.

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Just to name a couple, Towers Watson was formed by the merger of Towers Perrin and Watson Wyatt back in 2010. Haley oversaw that merger.

A big part of the Willis middle market presence in the United States stems from its 2008 acquisition of Hilb, Rogal and Hobbs.

Scale comes into the Willis Towers Watson combination in a couple of ways.  Haley sees the fact that Towers Watson and Willis are coming together as two same-sized companies as an advantage.

“It is much easier to create a working environment when you have two roughly equal-sized firms than when you have one that is much larger than the other,” Haley said.

Pre-merger, according to company statements, Willis had more than 18,000 employees. Towers Watson had approximately 15,000.

Dominic Casserley, Deputy CEO and President, Willis Towers Watson

Dominic Casserley, Deputy CEO and President, Willis Towers Watson

Scale, as in bigger size, is also a consideration in the investment realm according to Casserley.

Among other responsibilities, Casserley oversees investment and reinsurance for WTW.

“The merger enables an uptick in client service and enables us to make some investments that might have been harder for us to do as separate firms,” Casserley said.

Although both Casserley and Haley have plenty of experience in acquisitions, and this is a busy time for M&A in general, Haley said Willis Towers Watson and its leaders are concentrating on clients and merging their cultures, rather than casting about for more acquisition targets, at least for now.

“For the first 12 to 18 months, it would have to be an exceptional opportunity,” said Haley.

“It would have to be unique and something that if we let it pass we would never have the chance again,” he said.

Opportunity Knocks

As it stands, the global reach of Towers Watson and its client list are a grand opportunity for Willis.

“One of the things we know is that if you don’t have the relationships ahead of time it is very difficult not to finish second,” Haley said.

“The merger enables an uptick in client service and enables us to make some investments that might have been harder for us to do as separate firms.” — Dominic Casserley, deputy CEO and president, Willis Towers Watson

On the other side, adding the legacy Willis expertise in property/casualty insurance broking gives legacy Towers Watson team members one more tool to bring into their conversations with clients.

“We have client relationship directors that are responsible for understanding their whole business strategy and for understanding the key people and for bringing together the appropriate subject matter experts. What we are doing now is we are adding one more subject matter expert,” Haley said.

“We are not asking them to do something new or fundamentally different from what they’ve done before.”

“The grand prize is having our folks work together across lines and work cooperatively with clients to identify and solve those problems.” — John Haley, CEO, Willis Towers Watson

Casserley stressed that the fact that Willis can now take advantage of Towers Watson’s large cap relationships doesn’t mean that Willis is turning away from its strength or its relationships in the middle market.

“This is not a pivot,” Casserley said.

The merger also allows the benefits-focused legacy Towers Watson employees to bring yet another tool to their clients, the insurance expertise of the legacy Willis employees.

“We don’t know what the solutions we come up with will be,” Haley said.

“But we do know that the human side and the risk side are related. We think they are not only related today but they are going to be increasingly related in the future.

“The grand prize is having our folks work together across lines and work cooperatively with clients to identify and solve those problems.”

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Casserley said how the Willis Towers Watson colleagues find those solutions as part of a new, integrated platform is an exciting unknown.

“It may well be applying property and casualty techniques to a benefits problem and vice versa,” he said.

“Or it might be applying an actuarial analysis to a property/casualty risk in a way that hasn’t been done before. You won’t know that until you see the teams literally intertwined,” he said.

Dan Reynolds is editor-in-chief of Risk & Insurance. He can be reached at [email protected]
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Sponsored: Liberty International Underwriters

Cyber: The Overlooked Environmental Threat

Environmental businesses often don't see themselves as a target, but their operations are just as vulnerable to the threat of an industrial cyber attack.
By: | August 3, 2016 • 6 min read
LIU_SponsoredContent

“Cyber breach” conjures fears of lost or ransomed data, denial of service, leaked corporate secrets and phishing scams.

But in a world where so many physical operations are automated and controlled by digital technologies, the consequences of cyber attacks extend far beyond the digital realm to include property damage, bodily injury, and even environmental pollution.

Industrial companies that deal with hazardous materials — like power plants, refineries, factories, water treatment facilities or pipelines — are heavily dependent on automated technology to maximize their efficiency. Other sectors use technology to control HVAC systems, power and utilities, placing their properties at risk as well.

Cyber risks like theft of personally identifiable data have been highly publicized in recent years, but physical risks like pollution sparked by a cyber breach may not be as obvious.

“It’s significant to lose 100,000 customers’ Social Security numbers,” said William Bell, Senior Vice President, Environmental, Liberty International Underwriters, “but can you imagine if a waste treatment facility’s operations get hacked, gates open, and thousands of tons of raw sewage go flowing down a local river?”

In many industrial complexes, a network of sensors gathers and monitors data around machinery efficiency and the flow of the materials being processed. They send that information to computer terminals that interpret the data into commands for the hardware elements like motors, pumps and valves.

This automation technology can control, for example, the flow of pipelines, the level of water or waste held in a reservoir, or the gates that hold in and control the release of vast quantities of sewage and other process materials. Hackers who want to cause catastrophe could hijack that system and unleash damaging pollutants.

And it’s already happened.

In 2000, a hacker caused 800,000 liters of untreated sewage to flood the waterways of Maroochy Shire, Australia. In 2009, an IT contractor, disgruntled because he was not hired full-time, disabled leak detection alarm systems on three off-shore oil rigs near Long Beach, Calif.

Just last year, cyber attackers infiltrated the network of a German steel mill through a phishing scam, eventually hacking into the production control system and manipulating a blast furnace so it could not be shut down. The incident led to significant property damage.

According to a leading industrial security expert and executive director of the International Society of Automation, “Today’s operational technologies—such as sensors, SCADA systems, software and other controls that drive modern industrial processes—are vulnerable to cyber attack. The risk of serious damage or compromise to power and chemical plants, oil and gas facilities, chemical and water installations and other vital critical infrastructure assets is real.”

“The hacks could come from anywhere: a teenager looking for entertainment, a disgruntled worker, or more sophisticated criminals or terrorists,” Bell said. “There are certainly groups out there with political and ideological motivations to wreak that kind of havoc.”

LIU_SponsoredContent“We are working to bring the cyber component of environmental risk to the forefront. Cyber security is not just an IT issue. Industry executives need to be aware of the real-world risks and danger associated with an industrial cyber attack as well as the critical differences between cyber security and operational technology security.”

— William Bell, Senior Vice President, Environmental, Liberty International Underwriters

The cleanup cost of an environmental disaster can climb into the hundreds of millions, and even if a cyber breach triggered the event, a cyber policy alone will not cover the physical and environmental damage it caused.

The risk is even more pointed now, as resource conservation becomes increasingly important. Weather related catastrophe modeling is changing as both flooding and drought become more severe and frequent in different regions of the U.S. Pollution of major waterways and watersheds could have severe consequences if it affects drinking water sources, agriculture and other industrial applications that depend on this resource.

Managing the Risk

LIU_SponsoredContentUnfortunately, major industrial corporations sometimes address their environmental exposure with some hubris. They trust in their engineers to remove the risk by designing airtight systems, to make a disaster next to impossible. The prospect of buying environmental insurance, then, would be superfluous, an expression of doubt in their science-backed systems.

Despite the strongest risk management efforts, though, no disaster is 100 percent avoidable.

“We are working to bring the cyber component of environmental risk to the forefront,” Bell said. “Cyber security is not just an IT issue. Industry executives need to be aware of the real-world risks and danger associated with an industrial cyber attack as well as the critical differences between cyber security and operational technology security.”

The focus on network security and data protection has distracted industry leaders from strengthening operational technology security. Energy, manufacturing and other industrial sectors lack best practice standards when it comes to securing their automated processes.

After the Homeland Security Act of 2002, the Department of Homeland Security began comprehensive assessments of critical infrastructure’s cyber vulnerability, working with owners and operators to develop solutions. It also offers informational guides for private companies to do the same. The National Institute of Standards and Technology also continues work on its cyber security framework for critical infrastructure. Although this helps to establish some best practices, it does not completely mitigate the risk.

Many businesses don’t see themselves as a target, but they need to look beyond their own operations and property lines. They could be an attractive target due to their proximity to densely populated areas or resources such as waterways and highways, or nationally or historically significant areas. The goal of a cyber terrorist is not always to harm the target itself, but the collateral damage.

The Role of Insurance

LIU_SponsoredContent“Environmental liability is still by and large viewed as a discretionary purchase,” Bell said, “but the threat of a cyber attack that can manipulate those systems and ultimately lead to a pollution incident is added incentive to buy environmental coverage.”

Liberty International Underwriters’ environmental coverage could respond to many pollution conditions set off by a cyber breach event.

“Property damage, bodily injury and cleanup of any pollution at or emanating from a covered property would likely be taken care of,” Bell said. “The risk is not so much the cyber exposure but the consequence of the attack. The resulting claims and degradation to the environment could be severe, especially if the insured was a target chosen because of their unique position to have a large effect on the local population and environment.”

LIU also offers dedicated Cyber Liability insurance solutions designed to manage and mitigate the cost of responding to a cyber attack and any resultant loss of data and associated liability. Coverage includes proactive data breach response services designed to help organizations comply with regulatory requirements and prevent data breaches.

LIU’s loss control managers are also on hand to conduct assessments of insureds’ properties and facilities to examine potential environmental impacts. They can educate brokers on the importance of enhancing cyber security to prevent an environmental accident in the first place.

“People are relying more and more on their systems, automaton is increasing, and the risk is growing,” Bell said. “We’re all focused on protecting data, but the consequences of a cyber breach can be much farther reaching than data alone.”

To learn more about Liberty International Underwriters’ environmental coverages and services, visit www.LIU-USA.com.

Liberty International Underwriters is the marketing name for the broker-distributed specialty lines business operations of Liberty Mutual Insurance. Certain coverage may be provided by a surplus lines insurer. Surplus lines insurers do not generally participate in state guaranty funds and insureds are therefore not protected by such funds. This literature is a summary only and does not include all terms, conditions, or exclusions of the coverage described. Please refer to the actual policy issued for complete details of coverage and exclusions.

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This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with Liberty International Underwriters. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.

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LIU is part of the Global Specialty Division of Liberty Mutual Insurance.
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