Email
Newsletters
R&I ONE®
(weekly)
The best articles from around the web and R&I, handpicked by R&I editors.
WORKERSCOMP FORUM
(weekly)
Workers' Comp news and insights as well as columns and features from R&I.
RISK SCENARIOS
(monthly)
Update on new scenarios as well as upcoming Risk Scenarios Live! events.

The Internet of Things

Connected to Custom Coverage

The Internet of Things may lead to more personalized insurance coverage, benefiting both insurers and customers.
By: | October 15, 2014 • 6 min read
10152014_07_cyber_smart_home

Seismic changes are afoot in the insurance world with new technological developments stemming from the rush to the Internet of Things (IoT).

Advertisement




According to a report from McKinsey Global Institute, IoT has the potential to unleash as much as $6.2 trillion in new global economic value annually by 2025.

But what value will it bring to the insurance industry and, more specifically, to their customers? Let’s take a look at a few common areas of insurance — automotive, health benefits and commercial real estate — and see what the future holds.

Connected Cars

Do you have the same driving patterns as your friends, family and colleagues? It’s highly unlikely, but until now, you’ve had no choice but to pay the same rates and premiums, based on the average risk level. If you are a safer than average driver, you end up paying to cover those at greater risk. Is it fair and is this the best system we can have?

Paul Bermingham, executive director of claims, Xchanging Claims Services

Paul Bermingham, executive director of claims, Xchanging Claims Services

One in five new cars already collect driver and driving data for car manufacturers, but the future of the connected car will allow consumers to manage their individual automotive policies from the comfort of their driver seats.

Automotive dealers will be able to team up with insurance companies to provide data on driving habits and behaviors such as acceleration and taking corners too harshly via embedded sensors, and assign highly personalized risk scores.

But take this another step into the future and picture your car connecting to your Facebook. According to Ovum, insurers should focus on creative initiatives that analyze data from a number of sources, including social media and machine-to-machine communications.

If your car could sort through your contacts and match your driving profile (developed by the embedded sensors) to other people with similar driving profiles then you could band together to buy insurance as a group. For this example’s sake, imagine that you’re the picture-perfect driver with zero black marks on your record and your car has grouped you with other spotless drivers.

Your group of safe drivers can now buy insurance for a much lower premium and will qualify for a massive safe driver discount. Will connected cars be the ticket to replacing individual or company policies?

Driving Like a Girl

You may read this and think I’m being sexist, but the insurance industry has notoriously charged teenage male drivers much higher premiums than their female counterparts. In 2012, however, the European Court of Justice passed the “EU Gender Directive” that stated men and women must be offered the same quote if their circumstances are otherwise identical.

In response, Drive Like a Girl, a UK-based, telematics car insurer, has used little black boxes to record driving behaviors and discern whether a driver is driving with the profile of a 17-year-old girl regardless of age, gender, occupation, etc.

Video: Wireless Car describes the wide-ranging benefits of telematics to both drivers, manufacturers and businesses.

Telematics allows an insurer to provide lower rates accordingly. So, you don’t actually have to be a 17-year-old girl to catch a break on your insurance; you just have to drive like one!

The EU ruling is only one factor fueling the massive growth of global insurance telematics subscriptions, expected to grow 81 percent from 5.5 million at the end of 2013, to 107 million in 2018. More consumers want to take insurance underwriting into their own hands.

The United States doesn’t have a similar ruling on the books yet, but some companies, such as Progressive, are relying on the technology.

More than one million drivers have chosen to install that company’s device under the wheel, which allows Progressive to analyze individual driving habits and track projected savings, allowing a totally personalized rate for the driver.

The emergence of mobile apps and enhanced customer experiences through the use of technology in order to improve customer retention are additional reasons for this growth.

Impact on Health

Wearable devices such as smart watches or wristbands allow employees and consumers to say, and prove, that their lifestyles are low-risk. Fitness junkies and professional athletes are already commonly using this technology to monitor heart rate, stress levels, sleep schedules and calories burned.

But the next logical step is to use these devices to qualify for better employee health insurance or personal health insurance discounts.

Video: Some employees at Atlantic Corp. talk about the health changes they have experienced since wearing Fitbit.

According to research from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation and the American Hospital Association’s Health Research and Educational Trust, the cost of employee health insurance is still increasing faster than wages and overall inflation.

Currently, the average price for a single worker is $6,025 and the average annual premium for a family plan rose to $16,834. But with the Affordable Care Act’s higher costs for employers, we will begin to see more companies turning to wearable devices to help them monitor their employee’s health in the near future.

Advertisement




In order to combat costs, wearables will be given to employees, and incentive programs will be created to encourage their use.

For example, British Petroleum handed out Fitbit Zip devices to about 14,000 employees in 2013. If employees took one million steps, they received points that qualified them for lower insurance premiums.

In fact, Fitbit reports that sales to companies are one of the fastest growing segments of its customer base. We may need to establish a new technology acronym to replace BYOD — perhaps BYOW will take off in 2015?

The technology can also usher in crowdsourcing for personal health insurance as well — there is undeniably more buying power with 1,000 individuals than just one person.

Perhaps this will even open the door to pet insurance as well given new wearables designed specifically for man’s best friend continue to roll out. And what does the insurance industry love more than the ability to break into niche markets? Insurance companies can use this technology to target low-risk opportunities to drive a better return and greater volumes.

Automatic Adjustments

The advent of smart commercial buildings will eliminate the need for building managers to total a stated insurable value by listing everything on its premises.

With a smart building monitoring itself and updating its central system in real time, the building can tell an insurer that its risk profile this afternoon is at at a lower risk than it was just yesterday.

Instead, property premiums can be automatically tallied by connecting the insurance company to the building’s central smart hub, which houses all of the data such as air quality and temperature.

Access to security systems, sprinklers, and disaster recovery plans in one location provides a much crisper insurance profile than just relying on raw building and cost data.

With a smart building monitoring itself and updating its central system in real time, the building can tell an insurer that its risk profile this afternoon is at at a lower risk than it was just yesterday.

Rather than replacing an annual policy or going through the hassle of a three year deal, policies can be adjusted daily.

As such, building owners could qualify for better insurance premiums by providing a historical view of building trends. There are also benefits aside from cost savings.

Advertisement




For example, say you own a building in Miami. You can match and profile your hurricane risk by the minute and remediate high-risk issues very quickly. Additionally, the need to hire field evaluators to do this process manually is eliminated.

Thanks to the advancements taking place within the IoT, shopping for insurance of any sort will be akin to shopping for new clothes.

It won’t be a cumbersome process where you are purchasing retrofitted policies that don’t seem to match. It will be a sleek and automated experience where policies will be developed to fit individual needs.

We’re entering an insurance era where consumers and companies are empowered and we all should be ready for it.

Paul Bermingham is the executive director of claims at Xchanging Claims Services. He has 25 years’ claims experience in both national and global insurance markets. He can be reached at riskletters@lrp.com.
Share this article:

Crisis Management

Ebola Sends Employers Wake-Up Call

The threat of Ebola is a good time for employers to revisit emergency strategies for their mobile workforce.
By: | October 13, 2014 • 4 min read
ebola

Finally, it happened. The United State is experiencing its first cases of Ebola. A Liberian national living in Dallas died after being diagnosed with the virus, and now two of his treating nurses have now come down with the disease.

While the nation’s Ebola threat remains relatively minor right now, that’s hardly the case, of course, in the West African countries of Liberia, Nigeria, Guinea and Sierra Leone.

Advertisement




With the media reports as a backdrop, experts stress that recent Ebola media coverage on domestic shores is the perfect lynchpin for employers to review their emergency contingency plans already in place and update them, if necessary.

“The Ebola virus in Africa and the chikungunya virus in the Caribbean both demonstrate the need for employers and their employees to think about personal safety while traveling outside the United States,” said Dominick Zenzola, vice president and employee benefits manager for Chubb Accident & Health in Chicago.

“Employers have a duty of care to their employees who travel. Some prudent companies even have relocated business meetings and events to alternative destinations.” — Dominick Zenzola, vice president and employee benefits manager for Chubb Accident & Health

“Employers have a duty of care to their employees who travel. Some prudent companies even have relocated business meetings and events to alternative destinations,” he said.

Chicago-based Ed Hannibal, global leader of Mercer’s Mobility Practice, said that as more and more companies push deeper into global markets, safety and emergency planning for mobile employees has become an even more serious issue — from the executive on a single business trip to someone who locates to a country on a permanent basis.

Hannibal said employers should ensure their people systems are “linked up,” so they know where their employees are at all times, and where they have been or may be going.

Robert Quigley, U.S. medical director and senior vice president of medical assistance for International SOS, a Trevose, Pa.-based global medical and travel security risk services company, said employers have a “duty of care” to all their employees, but especially those who may need to work in high-risk countries or regions.

Advertisement




“The recent unfortunate Ebola outbreak should serve as a wake-up call for employers, to ensure they are doing the right thing,” Quigley said.

“Companies are reaching out to us, wondering if they are doing enough, or what is the benchmark in their industry segment. We have more than 10,000 clients, and many have a footprint in West Africa.”

Quigley also said it may be surprising that the companies with business in West Africa represent a wide spectrum of industry segments.

“Many of them want to know what everyone is doing in their segment, or what is [a] best practice for their industry,” he said.  “One of our jobs is to help educate them, but depending on the sector, they will have a different risk tolerance.”

For example, a nongovernmental organization would have higher risk tolerance because their work typically takes them into some of the world’s most dangerous places.

Different clients have decisions to make, but the one thing they can’t do is make them on the fly, Quigley said.

Many plans, he added, are still based on the last pandemic with influenza, so it makes sense for employers to take a look at their current plan. For others who may not have any solution, they need to have something in place even if it’s somewhat generic and can be customized to meet special situations like Ebola.

“It’s not a decision to be made on the run and it must involve many levels of decision makers, from the C-suite down,” he said. “It requires systemic ownership and involvement.” — Robert Quigley, U.S. medical director and senior vice president of medical assistance, International SOS

“It’s not a decision to be made on the run and it must involve many levels of decision makers, from the C-suite down,” he said. “It requires systemic ownership and involvement.

“Having a pandemic plan on the shelf is not good [enough],” Quigley said, adding that employers should create a specific task force responsible for making sure such protocols and procedures are constantly updated.

Quigley compares the situation to company fire drills, which most employers conduct two or three times a year.

“You don’t want to [have to] invent protocol when there actually is a fire,” he said. “Call it whatever you want, but it needs to be planned and rehearsed. Having an updated plan is also a good morale builder, because it lets those employees know they mean something to the company because it is being proactive and taking measures to protect them.”

Mercer’s Hannibal emphasizes the importance of communications. He said plans must be very clear when sending employees out around the globe, noting that different locations will mean different levels of communication.

“For example, they should know that Ebola is not an easy virus to contract; they need to make sure they have briefed employees about the specifics for any potential risk,” he said.

Advertisement




At a basic level, Chubb’s Zenzola said, employers need to remind global travelers to check the list of travel alerts and warnings from the U.S. Department of State — which now includes Russia, Ukraine, Israel, Thailand, Egypt and Mexico — and from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention before they book their trips and pack their bags.

“Right now, Ebola is the flavor of the month, but before it there was Mad Cow, SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome), bird flu, West Nile. There will always be something,” said SOS’ Quigley.

“The Ebola outbreak must remind employers to ensure they have updated, effective emergency procedures and protocols in place.”

Tom Starner is a freelance business writer and editor. He can be reached at riskletters@lrp.com.
Share this article:

Sponsored: Helmsman Management Services

Six Best Practices For Effective WC Management

An ever-changing healthcare landscape keeps workers comp managers on their toes.
By: | October 15, 2014 • 5 min read

It’s no secret that the professionals responsible for managing workers compensation programs need to be constantly vigilant.

Rising health care costs, complex state regulation, opioid-based prescription drug use and other scary trends tend to keep workers comp managers awake at night.

“Risk managers can never be comfortable because it’s the nature of the beast,” said Debbie Michel, president of Helmsman Management Services LLC, a third-party claims administrator (and a subsidiary of Liberty Mutual Insurance). “To manage comp requires a laser-like, constant focus on following best practices across the continuum.”

Michel pointed to two notable industry trends — rises in loss severity and overall medical spending — that will combine to drive comp costs higher. For example, loss severity is predicted to increase in 2014-2015, mainly due to those rising medical costs.

Debbie discusses the top workers’ comp challenge facing buyers and brokers.

The nation’s annual medical spending, for its part, is expected to grow 6.1 percent in 2014 and 6.2 percent on average from 2015 through 2022, according to the Federal Government’s Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. This increase is expected to be driven partially by increased medical services demand among the nation’s aging population – many of whom are baby boomers who have remained in the workplace longer.

Other emerging trends also can have a potential negative impact on comp costs. For example, the recent classification of obesity as a disease (and the corresponding rise of obesity in the U.S.) may increase both workers comp claim frequency and severity.

SponsoredContent_LM“The true goal here is to think about injured employees. Everyone needs to focus on helping them get well, back to work and functioning at their best. At the same time, following a best practices approach can reduce overall comp costs, and help risk managers get a much better night’s sleep.”
– Debbie Michel, President, Helmsman Management Services LLC (a subsidiary of Liberty Mutual)

“These are just some factors affecting the workers compensation loss dollar,” she added. “Risk managers, working with their TPAs and carriers, must focus on constant improvement. The good news is there are proven best practices to make it happen.”

Michel outlined some of those best practices risk managers can take to ensure they get the most value from their workers comp spending and help their employees receive the best possible medical outcomes:

Pre-Loss

1. Workplace Partnering

Risk managers should look to partner with workplace wellness/health programs. While typically managed by different departments, there is an obvious need for risk management and health and wellness programs to be aligned in understanding workforce demographics, health patterns and other claim red flags. These are the factors that often drive claims or impede recovery.

“A workforce might have a higher percentage of smokers or diabetics than the norm, something you can learn from health and wellness programs. Comp managers can collaborate with health and wellness programs to help mitigate the potential impact,” Michel said, adding that there needs to be a direct line between the workers compensation goals and overall employee health and wellness goals.

Debbie discusses the second biggest challenge facing buyers and brokers.

2. Financing Alternatives

Risk managers must constantly re-evaluate how they finance workers compensation insurance programs. For example, there could be an opportunity to reduce costs by moving to higher retention or deductible levels, or creating a captive. Taking on a larger financial, more direct stake in a workers comp program can drive positive changes in safety and related areas.

“We saw this trend grow in 2012-2013 during comp rate increases,” Michel said. “When you have something to lose, you naturally are more focused on safety and other pre-loss issues.”

3. TPA Training, Tenure and Resources

Businesses need to look for a tailored relationship with their TPA or carrier, where they work together to identify and build positive, strategic workers compensation programs. Also, they must exercise due diligence when choosing a TPA by taking a hard look at its training, experience and tools, which ultimately drive program performance.

For instance, Michel said, does the TPA hold regular monthly or quarterly meetings with clients and brokers to gauge progress or address issues? Or, does the TPA help create specific initiatives in a quest to take the workers compensation program to a higher level?

Post-Loss

4. Analytics to Drive Positive Outcomes, Lower Loss Costs

Michel explained that best practices for an effective comp claims management process involve taking advantage of today’s powerful analytics tools, especially sophisticated predictive modeling. When woven into an overall claims management strategy, analytics can pinpoint where to focus resources on a high-cost claim, or they can capture the best data to be used for future safety and accident prevention efforts.

“Big data and advanced analytics drive a better understanding of the claims process to bring down the total cost of risk,” Michel added.

5. Provider Network Reach, Collaboration

Risk managers must pay close attention to provider networks and specifically work with outcome-based networks – in those states that allow employers to direct the care of injured workers. Such providers understand workers compensation and how to achieve optimal outcomes.

Risk managers should also understand if and how the TPA interacts with treating physicians. For example, Helmsman offers a peer-to-peer process with its 10 regional medical directors (one in each claims office). While the medical directors work closely with claims case professionals, they also interact directly, “peer-to-peer,” with treatment providers to create effective care paths or considerations.

“We have seen a lot of value here for our clients,” Michel said. “It’s a true differentiator.”

6. Strategic Outlook

Most of all, Michel said, it’s important for risk managers, brokers and TPAs to think strategically – from pre-loss and prevention to a claims process that delivers the best possible outcome for injured workers.

Debbie explains the value of working with Helmsman Management Services.

Helmsman, which provides claims management, managed care and risk control solutions for businesses with 50 employees or more, offers clients what it calls the Account Management Stewardship Program. The program coordinates the “right” resources within an organization and brings together all critical players – risk manager, safety and claims professionals, broker, account manager, etc. The program also frequently utilizes subject matter experts (pharma, networks, nurses, etc.) to help increase knowledge levels for risk and safety managers.

“The true goal here is to think about injured employees,” Michel said. “Everyone needs to focus on helping them get well, back to work and functioning at their best.

“At the same time, following a best practices approach can reduce overall comp costs, and help risk managers get a much better night’s sleep,” she said.

To learn more about how a third-party administrator like Helmsman Management Services LLC (a subsidiary of Liberty Mutual) can help manage your workers compensation costs, contact your broker.

Email Debbie Michel

Visit Helmsman’s website

@HelmsmanTPA Twitter

Additional Insights 

Debbie discusses how Helmsman drives outcomes for risk managers.

Debbie explains how to manage medical outcomes.

Debbie discusses considerations when selecting a TPA.

SponsoredContent

BrandStudioLogo

This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with Helmsman Management Services. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.


Helmsman Management Services (HMS) helps better control the total cost of risk by delivering superior outcomes for workers compensation, general liability and commercial auto claims. The third party claims administrator – a wholly owned subsidiary of Liberty Mutual Insurance – delivers better outcomes by blending the strength and innovation of a major carrier with the flexibility of an independent TPA.
Share this article: