Battery Risks

Exploding Exposures

From fire risk to defective counterfeits, lithium-ion batteries present insurers and risk managers with a variety of property and liability challenges. 
By: | August 3, 2016 • 5 min read
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From personal items such as e-cigarettes, cellphones and laptops to power tools, hoverboards, electric vehicles and alternative energy storage, rechargeable lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) come in all shapes and sizes, and are integral to modern living.

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But despite their increasing application, the fire risks associated with LIBs have gained publicity of late, piquing the interest of insurers across a range of disciplines, from property and casualty to supply chain to product and environmental liability.

If overheated, LIBs can enter “thermal runaway,” emitting flammable material — sometimes in the form of small explosions; the bigger or more powerful the battery, the more impactful the event.

LIBs include a number of safety features to minimize the risk of thermal runaway. However, overcharging, damage to the battery, using an improper charging device or even excessive discharge can all trigger the problem.

After a UPS plane carrying a bulk LIB cargo caught fire and crashed in 2010, at least 18 airlines, including Cathay Pacific, Emirates and Qatar Airways, banned the bulk haulage of such cargo, causing supply chain headaches for companies transporting LIB products.

There have also been incidents when personal items have ignited in the carry hold on passenger flights.

A study by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) showed that gas venting from the batteries had the potential to “rocket” the battery away from the heat source. In a bulk storage facility, this could send batteries off into other parts of the warehouse, spreading the fire.

“If you are selling lithium batteries, it is even more important to have detailed instructions and warnings because there are so many things that can go wrong.”  — Paul Owens, products liability manager, Sadler Products Liability Insurance

Indeed, bulk storage situations pose the biggest threat due to the risk of contagious overheating when multiple batteries are in close proximity.

“When you have a lot of these batteries together, fires can grow very quickly and be very damaging,” says Lou Gritzo, vice president of research at FM Global.

However, Gritzo’s firm said it made a major research breakthrough in April that could help mitigate LIB fire risk.

Lou Gritzo, vice president of research, FM Global

Lou Gritzo, vice president of research, FM Global

In partnership with the National Fire Protection Agency and the Fire Protection Research Foundation’s Property Insurance Research Group, FM Global conducted a first-of-its-kind warehouse fire test on the type of LIBs used in electric cars and energy storage. The test, he said, identified a sprinkler configuration that provides an “adequate fire protection point.”

Gritzo hopes the test results, which he expects to be published in a few months following data quality assurance checks, can be taken on board as an industry standard.

The results do not resolve the issue of air cargo safety, though some findings may be extrapolated out to develop in-flight fire extinguishing systems and improve safety for LIB cargo transportation.

Beyond the warehouse environment, LIB-powered devices present a product liability risk for manufacturers, importers, distributors and retailers. The biggest hazard lies in importing products that have been installed with defective or even counterfeited batteries that have been repackaged and rebranded to look superior.

In February, for example, U.S. Customs and Border Protection seized 3,500 hoverboards worth $1.8 million that reportedly contained substandard counterfeit batteries that posed a safety risk.

“If you are an electronics manufacturer, it is essential you know who and where you are buying your batteries from, that you are getting high quality batteries, and that they have high thermal runaway thresholds,” said Morgan Kyte, senior vice president and technology team leader at Marsh. R8-16p50-51_9Lithium.indd

Detailed Warnings Required

The importer of defective goods is considered the manufacturer in the eyes of the law, and in the eyes of insurers in the event of a claim, said Paul Owens, products liability manager at Sadler Products Liability Insurance.

“Importers are top of the pyramid in the U.S. as no one is going overseas to recover,” he said. Most importers are buying from companies whose product liability policies won’t respond in the United States.

“Warning and instruction defect is a common entry into a product liability lawsuit,” Owens added.

“If you are selling lithium batteries, it is even more important to have detailed instructions and warnings because there are so many things that can go wrong.”

“When you have a lot of these batteries together, fires can grow very quickly and be very damaging.” — Lou Gritzo, vice president of research, FM Global

Retailers and wholesalers who purchase from U.S. manufacturers at least know they have a route of recourse in the event of a claim, though it is likely they would be dragged into litigation.

When e-cigarette user Jennifer Reis was set on fire in 2015 when the battery in her device exploded, the e-cigarette’s distributor, wholesaler and even the Tobacco Expo store where she bought it were all named in the lawsuit. Reis was awarded $1.9 million in damages.

“Retailers and distributors should ask their suppliers to name them as additional insureds on their policies,” said Owens.

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“If you are named as an additional insured, the importer’s policy is primary and yours is secondary, which is an important step for retailers and wholesalers.”

However, Owen noted, not all insurance carriers are comfortable writing coverage for LIB-powered products.

“You have to be very careful with the policies you buy as some can be very narrowly written — some have full health-hazard exclusions, and for items like e-cigarettes this leaves very little coverage.”

It is not always easy to determine whether a thermal runaway event has been caused by a defective LIB, a defective electronic device or human error, Kyte said.

“Often there is not much material left after one of these, though there are certain tests that can be done and sometimes it is possible to extrapolate a sequence of events to determine the cause.”

Quality Verification

The best way to avoid expensive product liability claims is to only buy and sell LIBs and chargers of the highest quality.

“This will cost you and your customer a little more, but it’s nothing compared to the increase in premiums after a product liability claim,” said Owens.

Lithium manganese (lMR) and hybrid (NiMH) batteries are considered chemically safer than most LIBs and do not require protection circuits, he said.

“Importers need to be good engineers. They should make sure they buy from reputable sources and it is advisable to batch test products that contain LIBs,” he added. &

Antony Ireland is a London-based financial journalist. He can be reached at [email protected]
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The Law

Legal Spotlight

A look at the latest legal cases impacting the industry.
By: | May 24, 2016 • 4 min read
You Be the Judge

Court Sinks Subrogation

On March 17, 2012, the commander, a vessel owned by Nature’s Way Marine, ran aground in the mouth of a narrow channel of the Mississippi River near Crown Point, La., owned and operated by Crown Point Holdings LLC.

R6-16p14_LegalSpotlight.inddAs it maneuvered to free itself, the movements created “extreme wave wash” that broke the mooring lines of two of Crown Point’s vessels, the Port Gibson and the Buccaneer, grounding them on a mud bank.

On March 21, the Port Gibson began to take on water and sank, pulling the Buccaneer down with it. After raising the ships, it was discovered Port Gibson’s hull was punctured by a bolt-studded piece of timber.

Osprey Underwriting Agency Ltd., which issued Crown Point marine hull insurance on the Port Gibson and the Buccaneer, paid for salvage and damage expenses and then, as subrogee, it sued Nature’s Way for reimbursement, arguing the Commander’s maneuvers caused the sinking of Crown Point’s vessels.

A district court in Louisiana ruled against Osprey. It said Osprey failed to prove the Commander’s actions caused the sinking, and even if the causation could be determined, Crown Point’s failure to warn anyone of the timber impaled in the hull was a superseding cause of the sinking.

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On March 25, the U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals upheld that decision. It concluded that experts from both sides “vehemently” disagreed with how the hull impalement occurred, and that marine law required negligence to be a “substantial factor” in the damage.

Scorecard: Osprey will not be reimbursed for its costs to salvage and repair the vessels.

Takeaway: Under general maritime law, “negligence must be a ‘substantial factor’ in the injury.”

Legal Fees Contested

On Dec. 29, 2011, William R. Kowalski and Hawaii International Seafood filed suit against Anova Food LLC, claiming patent infringement and false advertising. The lawsuit accused Anova of using Kowalski’s “tasteless smoke” process to treat tuna, although Anova advertised the fish were treated by a “clearsmoke” process.

Anova retained Gary Grimmer as local counsel in Hawaii to represent it.

On Oct. 12, 2012, Anova requested a defense from the Hanover Insurance Co. and its subsidiary, Massachusetts Bay Insurance Co. (“Hanover”). Defense was granted under a reservation of rights, and the insurer agreed to pay Grimmer in accordance with its litigation guidelines and fees.

Hanover’s claim that it only agreed to hire Grimmer and not Zobrist conflicted with its payment of some of Zobrist’s legal fees, the court ruled.

Hanover stated it would not pay, however, for any fees paid by Anova prior to the claim being made.

The insurer said it would not apply the exclusion for injuries “arising out of” infringement of intellectual property, but would not indemnify Anova for any punitive damages.

On Dec. 11, 2012, the Zobrist law firm, which had a history with Anova’s intellectual property issues, filed its appearance as counsel of record for Anova, and was subsequently paid $284,624 by Hanover.

A year later, Hanover informed Anova it was transferring defense in the case from Grimmer to two other attorneys. At that time, it said that any continued involvement by Zobrist “will need to be funded directly” by Anova.

On June 19, 2014, Hanover asked for a court determination that it need not defend nor indemnify Anova. The insured filed a counterclaim for breach of contract and bad faith, arguing Hanover owed it a defense, and the unpaid balance to Zobrist of $385,153.

Anova reached a settlement with Kowalski in April 2015.

The U.S. District Court for the District of Hawaii ruled on March 24, 2016 that Hanover did have a duty to defend Anova but did not have to pay for legal services prior to Anova’s request for a defense.

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Because factual questions remained about the legal fees paid to Zobrist, the court denied Anova’s motion for summary judgment on its claim that Hanover breached its contract.

Scorecard: Additional court proceedings will determine whether Hanover must pay $385,153 for Zobrist’s legal fees.

Takeaway: Hanover’s claim that it only agreed to hire Grimmer and not Zobrist conflicted with its payment of some of Zobrist’s legal fees, the court ruled.

Request for Defense Denied

In 2009, Larry Naquin was using a land crane owned by Elevating Boats LLC (EBI) to move a “test block” when the welding holding the crane to its base failed.

Naquin jumped from the crane house, breaking both feet and sustaining a lower abdominal hernia. He was never able to return to physical work.

R6-16p14_LegalSpotlight.inddIn May 2012, a federal jury in Louisiana awarded Naquin $2.4 million for physical and emotional pain and lost wages. EBI appealed and the negligence verdict was upheld.

Subsequently, EBI sued State National Insurance Co. and London insurers, accusing them of breaching their contracts by denying EBI’s request for defense and indemnification.

On March 22, the U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals agreed with a lower court in dismissing EBI’s lawsuit.

Scorecard: The insurers are not responsible for indemnifying EBI.

Takeaway: EBI’s policy offered indemnity for the company “as owner of the Vessel,” and it was not triggered because the accident occurred on land. &

Anne Freedman is managing editor of Risk & Insurance. She can be reached at [email protected]
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Sponsored: Starr Companies

To Keep Cool in a Crisis, Companies Need a Comprehensive Solution

Corporate security threats now come in many forms, and mid-size companies should be prepared to cover them all.
By: | August 4, 2016 • 6 min read
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Threats against corporate security come in many forms, from intentional acts of violence to civil unrest to cyber-attacks. The perpetrators don’t discriminate by company size or sector, and the consequences can range from several thousand dollars lost to several lives lost.

The recent shooting in an Orlando nightclub that killed 49, for example, or last year’s San Bernardino shooting that killed 14, are somber reminders that terrorism and violence can erupt anywhere and in any type of business. In addition to loss of life, violence can translate into business interruption and property damage. In Ferguson, Mo., riots lead to over $4 million in property damage.

Cyber-attacks have also become commonplace, with hackers infiltrating private networks to steal data or hold it ransom.

Is your organization prepared for these risks?

“A lot of companies have a crisis response plan on paper, but they don’t have outside resources to come to their aid if there is an incident,” said Reggie Gibbs, Underwriter and Product Manager, Starr Companies.

Mid-size companies especially tend to lack comprehensive insurance coverage and crisis management services for a variety of security events due either to limited resources or an underestimation of their exposure.

Starr Companies’ Cyber and Terror Response (CTR) solution provides three coverages as well as crisis response services tailored to meet the needs of these companies. Each of its components addresses a common security threat.

SponsoredContent_Starr_0816“We don’t just want to indemnify the security risks our clients face; we want to help them actively manage them.”
 
— Reggie Gibbs, Underwriter & Product Manager, Starr Companies

Terror and Political Violence

“Political violence can be defined as a strike, riot, protest, or any type of unrest that gets out of hand and turns violent,” said Gibbs, who specializes in terrorism and political violence, workplace violence, and crisis management.

In the case of the Ferguson protests, any first party property damage or third party liability incurred by the disruption would be covered under the terrorism and political violence segment of the CTR solution.

In the case of a terror attack, organizations cannot necessarily rely on TRIA to pick up property losses. In the case of the Orlando shooting, for example, the likelihood of TRIA being invoked is low because property damage will not meet the threshold for coverage to kick in.

TRIA, reauthorized in 2015, provides a federal insurance backstop in the event of a terror attack. The U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, U.S. Attorney General, and U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security must declare an attack to be an act of terrorism, and property damage must exceed $5 million to trigger TRIA.

“We would still view the Orlando shooting as an act of terror, however, because of who the shooter claimed he was working for regardless if the ties to terror groups are clear or not. Therefore, our coverage would apply,” Gibbs said. Even if TRIA was enacted, however, companies would still have a lot of pieces to pick up following an attack. They may have injured or deceased employees, or face legal action from third parties.

Workplace Violence

For these situations, and any other incident of violence not driven by terrorism, the workplace violence component of Starr’s CTR solution would act as an umbrella to cover other liabilities such as legal liability, loss of life benefits, psychiatric care, and other crisis response services.

One such incident struck a Boston-area Bertucci’s in early May. An attacker wielding a knife drove his car into a Boston shopping mall before making his way into the nearby restaurant. He killed five, including restaurant workers and patrons.

“There was no ideological or political motivation behind it. He was just deranged.” Gibbs said. “Our workplace violence coverage can handle the loss of life benefits for both the employees and patrons killed in situations like this one.”

In the best cases, though, violence can be prevented altogether.

“If an employee reports a stalking threat, the policy would cover the expense of security guards,” Gibbs said. “In this case, it’s more of a pre-workplace violence coverage. It would de-escalate the situation.”

Cyber Liability

SponsoredContent_Starr_0816Attacks can also be non-physical.

Cyber extortion in particular is on the rise. Phishing scams lead employees to click on malicious links, unknowingly downloading ransomware onto their internal networks. The cyber criminals then hold companies’ networks ransom, asking for a sum of money in return for the release of data or to prevent a business interruption. The ransoms can be low — amounts that organizations can afford to pay.

“The hackers don’t want to attract the attention of law enforcement or regulatory agencies,” said Annamaria Landaverde, National Cyber Practice Leader & Professional Liability Underwriting Manager, Starr Companies. Landaverde specializes in the cyber component of the CTR coverage. “The FBI may not get involved if someone asks for $5,000. They are more likely to get involved if someone asks for $5 million.”

Since companies are not required by law to report cyber extortion —like they are for data breaches — many choose simply to pay the ransom and move on without generating any negative news headlines.

Starr_SponsoredContent“The hackers don’t want to attract the attention of any law enforcement or regulatory agencies. The F.B.I. won’t get involved if someone asks for $5,000. They will get involved if someone asks for $5 million.”

— Annamaria Landaverde, National Cyber Practice Leader & Underwriting Manager, Professional Liability Division, Starr Companies

“A California medical center recently had an incident like this where the hackers asked for $17,000 in ransom,” Landaverde said,” but the amounts can vary.”

While the ransom itself may seem manageable, many companies fail to recognize other costs associated with the identification and removal of the malware from their system. There may also be costs associated with forensics investigations, legal experts, public relations firms, third party lawsuits, and notification and credit monitoring.

“The cyber arm of the CTR coverage extends to liability that an organization would suffer as a result of a breach, or failure of security of the insured’s network,” Landaverde said. That includes not just cyber extortion, but outright data theft or denial-of-service attacks.

Crisis Management Services

SponsoredContent_Starr_0816“We don’t just want to indemnify the security risks our clients face; we want to help them actively manage them,” Gibbs said.

The fourth component of Starr’s CTR solution – crisis response — provides two outside consultants to insureds, with one specializing in “hard” security services like guards or instances of cyber extortion, and another focusing on crisis communications.

Without these outside services, there is only so much insurance can do in the aftermath of a crisis. Experienced consultants provide a range of security preparedness and response services to complement coverage and help insureds recover from an episode of violence or cyber event.

“From a communications perspective, our consultants can manage the public relations front to create clear and consistent messaging, but they can also stay in touch with families after a terror or other violent attack to make sure everyone stays informed,” Gibbs said.

They also serve as a first point of contact for insureds immediately after an event. If they need guidance quickly, consultants await at the ready.

“When a client purchases the product, they get a 24-hour hotline set up with one of our consultancies,” he said. “They can report an incident at any time, and our consultant will help either resolve a situation or deal with the aftermath in whatever way they can.”

While the Cyber and Terror Response package provides a comprehensive solution tailored for mid-size companies, Starr also offers standalone cyber liability and crisis management coverage on a primary and excess basis.

“For companies with greater exposure to a particular type of risk, or who simply want higher limits or greater customization, we have those standalone polices.” Landaverde said.

For more information on Starr Companies’ Cyber and Terror Response solution, visit https://www.starrcompanies.com/Insurance/CyberAndTerrorResponse.

Starr Companies is the worldwide marketing name for the operating insurance and travel assistance companies and subsidiaries of Starr International Company, Inc. and for the investment business of C. V. Starr & Co., Inc. and its subsidiaries.
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This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with Starr Companies. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.




Starr Companies is a global commercial insurance and financial services organization that provides innovative risk management solutions.
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