Professional Liability

Professional Liability Challenges

Overcapacity is the biggest threat to insurers in the short and long term.
By: | November 3, 2014 • 6 min read
11012014_10_plus_700x525 PB

Rates in the professional liability market are coming under increased pressure as a result of overcapacity and greater competition, with industry experts warning of dire consequences in the long term if it continues.

Among the areas hardest hit are directors’ and officers’ (D&O) and medical professional liability (MPL).

John Lopes, vice president of programs at Freedom Specialty Insurance, said overcapacity posed the biggest threat to insurers in the short and long term.

Advertisement




He said new entrants and smaller players would find it hard to build profitable scale without a competitive advantage other than price, and those who succeeded would likely do so at the expense of existing providers.

“Either way, the longer term issue is one of market saturation and fragmentation,” he said. “This will put pressure on pricing and profitability until market forces break the cycle.”

Christian Gravier, president of professional lines at Allied World North America, said that rates and terms and conditions for public D&O and side A difference in condition (DIC) were under the greatest pressure from increased competition and capacity.

“Sustained profitability of the product has made it extremely attractive and hence capacity is drawn to the line and rates have seen, in some areas, a precipitous drop,” he said.

Gravier said the increased use of capacity by competing insurers was causing disruption in some of the bigger markets, with larger limits of $25 million and $50 million becoming more prevalent.

Jeff Klenk, senior vice president of bond and financial products at Travelers, however, said that despite the surfeit of capacity, some more specialist areas had experienced rate increases.

“Capacity continues to be plentiful and the state of competition is very risk-specific,” he said.

Jeff Klenk, senior vice president of bond and financial products at Travelers

Jeff Klenk, senior vice president of bond and financial products at Travelers

“In those lines of business that have had more challenging results, or on accounts with more complex risks, we have seen rate increases.”

But it’s really cutting-edge sectors like cyber and privacy liability that are offering the most potential for growth as companies realize the extent of their exposure to data breaches and attacks, and brokers gain a better understanding of the product.

Chris Duca, senior vice president at RT ProExec and 2014 president of the Professional Liability Underwriting Society (PLUS) — which will be hosting its annual conference in November — said that alongside cyber, errors and omissions (E&O), and D&O lines in privately held as well as publicly traded and initial public offering (IPO) corporations offered the biggest growth potential.

He added that there was also increased demand for management, professional and health care liability, and MPL.

D&O Challenges

D&O is one of the biggest professional liability markets by premium volume. It’s estimated to be worth $6 billion in the U.S. alone, according to Allianz Global Corporate Specialty.

But despite the sector’s size and success, it has not been without its problems, stemming largely from the increase in claims after the 2009 financial crisis.

Advertisement




Damian Brew, national practice leader, FINPRO claims, at Marsh, said the biggest challenge facing D&O brokers is getting clients interested in new products.

A prime example, he said, was the level of cover D&O policies provide for entity investigation costs, in light of the Securities and Exchange Commission’s (SEC) renewed focus on company investigations.

“From that standpoint, many of those costs can be covered under a D&O policy,” he said, “but there are times when they fall outside of that coverage, and as a result we are now seeing more insurers offering specific cover for entity investigation costs.”

Medical Malpractice Risks

As a sector, medical professional liability accounted for $7.7 billion in premiums in 2013, according to A.M. Best, making it the No. 1 professional liability market by size.

Best’s August 2014 market report said that MPL underwriting and operating returns continued to outperform most of the property/casualty industry in 2013, despite the soft market.

It attributed that success to improvements in tort reform, better patient safety, a greater emphasis on loss mitigation and risk management, and more aggressive legal defense tactics.

SNL Financial, meanwhile, reported that despite MPL premiums continuing to fall in 2013, losses also declined to $4 billion in 2013 from $4.17 billion in 2012. The bulk of the drop in written premiums was in coverage for physicians, which fell to below $6 billion in 2013 from $7.18 billion in 2008.

“Medical professional liability is still the largest professional liability market by size.”

However, cover for other health care professionals grew to $1.2 billion in 2013 from under $1 billion in 2008.

Despite its relative success, the market remains highly sensitive to any price changes, one industry expert warned.

Robert Allen, president of Pro-Praxis Insurance, said, “All it takes is for one company to underprice the business and it has an effect on keeping pricing suppressed for the next year, raises the expectations of brokers looking for the best deal for their clients, and therefore makes it even harder for us to collectively move pricing to the right level.”

However, he added that there were areas of opportunity for growth, namely allied health facilities such as physical therapy and convenient care clinics, which have expanded at a phenomenal rate since the introduction of the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

“The growth in that space right now is just amazing,” he said.

Advertisement




Elke Kirsten-Brauer, executive vice president and chief underwriting officer of the medical liability division at MGIS Cos. Inc., said the MPL industry continues to face a multitude of challenges, including new patient populations entering the marketplace for insureds, and an increasing number of older patients with more complex illnesses.

Uncertainty surrounding tort reform in different states, a rise in vicarious liability claims and the heightened risk of cyber and privacy breaches add to those issues, she said.

As a result, she said, the industry needs to look at how it assesses and rates new liabilities and exposures.

“The insurance industry needs to look at data and tools from the past and make sure it revises and refines its approaches for the future,” she said.

Emergence of Cyber Liability

The hottest area in professional liability is undoubtedly cyber and privacy liability.

Philadelphia Insurance Cos.’ senior vice-president of underwriting, Ziad Kubursi, said that cyber liability was the main driver for demand in professional liability because it affected almost everyone.

Marsh’s Brew, meanwhile, believes the market will grow exponentially over the next five to 10 years as more insurers look to write the business and gain access to better loss history data.

“I think everyone is waiting for the next shoe to drop,” he said.

“It’s an exciting area where we have seen a lot of growth and I would expect to see more growth.”

Jim Whetstone, senior vice president and professions practice leader at Hiscox, said that companies were increasingly adding cyber and privacy data breach to their general professional liability policies to protect themselves against these new risks.

“We have seen increased demand for cyber and privacy cover as more brokers understand the product now and are able to explain it to their clients,” he said.

Impact of Legislation

Another big growth area is franchisors’ liability, which covers franchisers against lawsuits brought by franchisees.

Earlier this year, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) ruled that McDonald’s can now be considered a “joint employer” and held liable for the employment practices of its franchisees.

11012014_10_plus_350px_sidebar

Peter Taffae, managing director at ExecutivePerils, said the ruling could have far-reaching implications for all company employment practices.

“The majority of franchisees don’t want to be told how to hire their employees or what to pay them because they are all independent businesses that operate on their own,” he said.

“What’s happened from an insurance E&O perspective is that some providers are now pulling back from offering this kind of cover and others are not offering it at all, meaning that prices are going up across the board,” Taffae said.

Alex Wright is a U.K.-based business journalist, who previously was deputy business editor at The Royal Gazette in Bermuda. You can reach him at riskletters@lrp.com.
Share this article:

Column: Technology

FDA Medical Device Guidance

By: | November 3, 2014 • 2 min read
Ara Trembly is founder of The Tech Consultant and The Rogue Guru Blog. He can be reached at riskletters@lrp.com.

The Food and Drug Administration has released “long-awaited” guidelines on the cyber security of medical devices.

Obviously, this is a concern for health and life insurers, but it is also relevant to other areas of coverage, such as automobile or any insurance that pays medical claims.

“There is no such thing as a threat-proof medical device,” said Suzanne Schwartz, director of emergency preparedness at the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health, in an article in “USA Today” on the release of the guidelines.

“…many device manufacturers and software vendors only learn of vulnerabilities in their products after said products have been hacked.”

“It is important for medical device manufacturers to remain vigilant about cyber-security and to appropriately protect patients from those risks.”

Important indeed. One would think that such statements would be followed by some specific safety requirements, or at least by substantive recommendations.

Advertisement




Instead, the article noted, “The agency is recommending that manufacturers consider cyber security risks as they design and develop medical devices.”

And which particular risks might those be? It seems there is again no specificity.

Once having “considered” those risks, however, the FDA says companies should give the FDA information about the potential risks they found, as well as what controls they put in place to mitigate them.

While this is a nice idea, it ignores certain realities in the world of technology development in general and cyber security in particular.

First, many device manufacturers and software vendors only learn of vulnerabilities in their products after said products have been hacked.

Yes, it would be fair to say that manufacturers and vendors should do a better job of testing in order to ferret out potential problems, but it is also fair to say that the number of ways to crack a product’s code are many and that not all of those ways are likely to be anticipated.

And at some point in the product development process, the testing phase must come to an end — unless the vendor is oblivious to the possibilities for profitably marketing a given product.

“Many devices are poorly secured and do not require a lot to hack. If there is sufficient incentive to do so, it will happen, causing harm to patients,” said Shel Sharma, director of product marketing for Cyphort, a threat-detection company, in the published piece.

But why would anyone want to hack into a medical device, implanted or otherwise? One obvious reason might indeed be to do harm to that individual. If an implant suddenly overheats and loses functionality, who is to say it wasn’t an accident, as opposed to attempted murder?

More ominous, however, is the idea that devices of various kinds must, by design, interface with broader medical systems that contain much more data — including confidential data on health and things like Social Security numbers. It might also be that a compromised device would provide a gateway to an entire enterprise, allowing for mischief and significant data loss, and the liability that would accompany same.

Advertisement




And liability is precisely the point for insurers of nearly any stripe. Of course, this whole risk scenario may represent a new area of insurance coverage to be marketed by our carriers.

Even in that case, however, insurers hardly want device makers to make things easy for criminals, because the carriers must then pay the claims. The FDA held a national workshop on medical devices and cyber security in October. Let’s hope the risks and the solutions that emerge from that gathering are more clearly defined.

Share this article:

Sponsored: Liberty International Underwriters

From Coast to Coast

Planning the Left Coast Lifter's complex voyage demands a specialized team of professionals.
By: | January 7, 2015 • 5 min read

SponsoredContent_LIU
The 3,920-ton Left Coast Lifter, originally built by Fluor Construction to help build the new Bay Bridge in San Francisco, will be integral in rebuilding the Tappan Zee Bridge by 2018.

The Lifter and the Statue of Liberty

When he got the news, Scot Burford could see it as clearly as if somebody handed him an 8 by 11 color photograph.

On January 30,  the Left Coast Lifter, a massive crane originally built by Fluor Construction to help build the new Bay Bridge in San Francisco, steamed past the Statue of Liberty. Excited observers, who saw the crane entering New York Harbor, dubbed it the “The Hudson River Hoister,” honoring its new role in rebuilding the Tappan Zee Bridge over the Hudson River.

Powered by two stout-hearted tug boats, the Lauren Foss and the Iver Foss, it took more than five weeks for the huge crane to complete the 6,000 mile ocean journey from San Francisco to New York via the Panama Canal.

Scot took a deep breath and reflected on all the work needed to plan every aspect of the crane’s complicated journey.

A risk engineer at Liberty International Underwriters (LIU), Burford worked with a specialized team of marine insurance and risk management professionals which included John Phillips, LIU’s Hull Product Line Leader, Sean Dollahon, an LIU Marine underwriter, and Rick Falcinelli, LIU’s Marine Risk Engineering Manager, to complete a detailed analysis of the crane’s proposed route. Based on a multitude of factors, the LIU team confirmed the safety of the route, produced clear guidelines for the tug captains that included weather restrictions, predetermined ports of refuge in the case of bad weather as well as specifying the ballast conditions and rigging of tow gear on the tugs.

Of equal importance, the deep expertise and extensive experience of the LIU team ensured that the most knowledgeable local surveyors and tugboat captains with the best safety records were selected for the project. After all, the most careful of plans will only be as effective as the people who execute them.

The tremendous size of the Left Coast Lifter presented some unique challenges in preparing for its voyage.

SponsoredContent_LIU

The original intention was to dry tow the crane by loading and securing it on a semi-submersible vessel. However, the lack of an American-flagged vessel that could accommodate the Left Coast Lifter created many logistical complexities and it was decided that the crane would be towed on its own barge.

At first, the LIU team was concerned since the barge was not intended for ocean travel and therefore lacked towing skegs and other structural components typically found on oceangoing barges.

But a detailed review of the plan with the client and contractors gave the LIU team confidence. In this instance, the sheer weight and size of the crane provided sufficient stability, and with the addition of a second tug on the barge’s stern, the LIU team, with its knowledge of barges and tugs, was confident the configuration was seaworthy and the barge would travel in a straight line. The team approved the plan and the crane began its successful voyage.

As impressive as the crane and its voyage were, it was just one piece in hundreds that needed to be underwritten and put in place for the Tappan Zee Bridge project to come off.

Time-Sensitive Quote

SponsoredContent_LIUThe rebuilding of the Tappan Zee Bridge, due to be completed in 2018, is the largest bridge construction project in the modern history of New York. The bridge is 3.1 miles long and will cost more than $3 billion to construct. The twin-span, cable-stayed bridge will be anchored to four mid-river towers.

When veteran contractors American Bridge, Fluor Corp., Granite Construction Northeast and Traylor Bros. formed a joint venture and won the contract to rebuild the Tappan Zee, one of the first things the consortium needed to do was find an insurance partner with the right coverages and technical expertise.

The Marsh broker, Ali Rizvi, Senior Vice President, working with the consortium, was well known to the LIU underwriting and engineering teams. In addition, Burford and the broker had worked on many projects in the past and had a strong relationship. These existing relationships were vital in facilitating efficient communication and data gathering, particularly given the scope and complexity of a project like the Tappan Zee.

And the scope of the project was indeed immense – more than 200 vessels, coming from all over the United States, would be moving construction equipment up the Hudson River.

An integrated team of LIU underwriters and risk engineers (including Burford, Phillips, Dollahon and Falcinelli) got to work evaluating the risk and the proper controls that the project required. Given the global scope of the project, the team’s ability to tap into their tight-knit global network of fellow LIU marine underwriters and engineers with deep industry relationships and expertise was invaluable.

In addition to the large number of vessels, the underwriting process was further complicated by many aspects of the project still being finalized.

“Because the consortium had just won this account, they were still working on contracts and contractors to finalize the deal and were unsure as to where most of the equipment and materials would be coming from,” Burford said.

Despite the massive size of the project and large number of stakeholders, LIU quickly turned around a quote involving three lines of marine coverage, Marine Liability, Project Cargo and Marine Hull & Machinery.

How could LIU produce such a complicated quote in a short period of time? It comes down to integrating risk engineers into the underwriting process, possessing deep industry experience on a global scale and having strong relationships that facilitate communication and trust.

SponsoredContent_LIU

Photo Credit: New York State Thruway Authority

When completed in 2018, the Tappan Zee will be eight lanes, with four emergency pullover lanes. Commuters sailing across it in their sedans and SUVs might appreciate the view of the Hudson, but they might never grasp the complexity of insuring three marine lines, covering the movements of hundreds of marine vessels carrying very expensive cargo.

Not to mention ferrying a 3,920-ton crane from coast to coast without a hitch.

But that’s what insurance does, in its quiet profundity.

SponsoredContent
BrandStudioLogo

This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with Liberty International Underwriters. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.




LIU is part of the Global Specialty Division of Liberty Mutual Insurance.
Share this article: