Reinsurance

Basking in the Sun Once More

Solvency II equivalency and NAIC’s “qualified jurisdiction” designations help Bermuda strengthen its position as a leading reinsurance domicile.
By: | May 24, 2016 • 5 min read
062016_07_Bermuda

Bermuda is one of the world’s biggest and most successful offshore reinsurance markets, largely as a result of its tax advantages, strong regulatory system and its proximity to the U.S. and Europe.

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But in recent years, many of the island’s reinsurers redomiciled to Europe, amid concerns over Bermuda’s international reputation, regulatory uncertainty and political instability.

The outflux started in 2010, when Flagstone Re redomiciled to Luxembourg and Allied World moved its holding company to Switzerland. The latest, Canopius, followed suit at the end of last year.

Companies are now returning to the island, though, after the announcement in March that the European Union granted it Solvency II equivalence.

Bermuda, along with Switzerland, is the only country that garnered Solvency II equivalence and was designated a “qualified jurisdiction” by the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC), allowing free cross-border trade with the U.S.

Brad Kading, president and executive director, ABIR

Brad Kading, president and executive director, ABIR

Further evidence of the island’s resurgence is borne out by the fact that 64 new reinsurance companies incorporated in Bermuda last year, according to the Bermuda Monetary Authority (BMA).

Meanwhile, seven of the island’s biggest reinsurers merged or were acquired over the last four years, with more deals expected, according to the Association of Bermuda Insurers and Reinsurers (ABIR).

Bermuda is also firmly established as one of the leading offshore domiciles for captive insurance, as well as an alternative capital market.

“Bermuda was always a leading reinsurance domicile,” said Brad Kading, president and executive director of ABIR. “These two bilateral agreements [Solvency II and NAIC qualified jurisdiction status] further cemented its position as a reputable domicile for reinsurance.”

Movers and Shakers

XL Catlin’s proposed move from Ireland back to Bermuda made the biggest headlines this year and will be accomplished in the third quarter, subject to shareholder approval. Bermuda was a stronghold for both companies before their merger. XL moved its main operations there 30 years ago, and Catlin incorporated its holding company in Bermuda in 1999.

XL Catlin’s CEO Mike McGavick said the fit with Bermuda is a natural one, given that a significant part of the company’s business and its largest operating subsidiary are already there.  He cited Solvency II equivalence as the main reason behind the move, adding that it would benefit clients, partners and shareholders alike.

“These two bilateral agreements [Solvency II and NAIC qualified jurisdiction status] further cemented its position as a reputable domicile for reinsurance.” — Brad Kading, president and executive director, Association of Bermuda Insurers and Reinsurers

“With the recent determination of full Solvency II equivalence in Bermuda, it has been concluded that the BMA is best situated to serve as XL’s group-wide supervisor and to approve XL’s internal capital model,” McGavick said.

Qatar Re also announced at the end of last year that it would relocate its main operations from Dubai to Bermuda after its merger with parent Qatar Insurance Co.’s Bermuda-domiciled reinsurer Antares Reinsurance.

CEO Gunther Saacke cited Bermuda’s “decades of proven reliability” and said that the move would enable the company to consolidate its capital and move closer to its brokers and clients in the U.S.

Ross Webber, CEO of the Bermuda Business Development Agency (BDA), said the decision by all of these companies to redomicile to Bermuda sent a “very positive message.”

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“No doubt Solvency II equivalence played a big part in all this, but Bermuda’s improving economic outlook and growth in business confidence is also a factor,” he said.

“Our company register is growing across all sectors at present, while consolidation only strengthened the physical presence of companies such as XL Catlin here on the island.

“As a result of all this, we are already seeing companies looking to set up new operations, to merge or to expand their operations here in Bermuda.”

Taking Flight

Webber said that the main reason behind companies leaving Bermuda in the first place was a move from U.S. and European regulators to bring companies back onshore.

Being offshore “was perceived as somehow being unpatriotic and somewhere you shouldn’t be,” he said.

Ross Webber, CEO, Bermuda Business Development Agency

Ross Webber, CEO, Bermuda Business Development Agency

“Some left simply because the CEO and leadership wanted to physically move themselves back onshore, along with the corporate structure that goes along with it.”

David Brown, a retired insurance industry veteran and former CEO of Flagstone Re, which redomiciled from Bermuda six years ago, said there was no single trigger for the exodus.

“I think that people were almost hedging their bets — not knowing if Bermuda was going to get Solvency II equivalence — by moving to jurisdictions in the EU that were considered more likely to succeed,” he said.

“Another factor at the time was the political risk associated with an unsustainable public debt growth, as well as a negative political climate against international business and expat employees generally.”

But he added that since the government started to tackle the debt problem and make the island more welcoming to international business, companies now are taking another look at the island.

Solvency II Equivalence

Gaining Solvency II equivalence means that Bermuda is now better positioned to meet the regulatory standards being redrawn by the International Association of Insurance Supervisors, said Kading,  as well as to provide more capacity for markets like Asia and Oceania.

Being offshore “was perceived as somehow being unpatriotic and somewhere you shouldn’t be,” — Ross Webber, CEO, Bermuda Business Development Agency

“All this means is that the Bermuda Monetary Authority is now recognized as a global group supervisor for targeted insurance groups and reinsurance can be conducted on a cross-border basis without market barriers,” he said.

“For Bermuda insurers, this means an efficient rather than redundant layer of group supervision and for reinsurers, it means cross-border trade without individual jurisdictional restrictions.”

Susan Molineux, senior financial analyst at A.M. Best, who was based on the island for more than a decade, said that achieving Solvency II equivalence was a “big win” for Bermuda.

“Bermuda expended a lot of effort to really explain to Europe what they do and how they do it, and it paid off in the long run,” she said.

The Future

Despite the positives, Bermuda still has a way to go to convince everyone that it is on the rise.

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Saddled with a $2 billion debt after seven years of deep recession, the government is under pressure to rein in costs and to find new revenue sources, mainly through tax collection.

A.M. Best said last year that it maintained a negative outlook for the island’s reinsurance industry. In response to this, the BDA is setting up industry focus groups. It is promoting Bermuda as a domicile in conjunction with ABIR members to attract new business from emerging markets such as Latin America and China.

After years of departures and uncertainty, Bermuda is seemingly restoring its position as a leading reinsurance market. &

Alex Wright is a U.K.-based business journalist, who previously was deputy business editor at The Royal Gazette in Bermuda. You can reach him at [email protected]
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Brokerage

Brokers: A Buyer’s Market for Captives 

Captives have substantial leverage to upgrade portfolios and enhance coverage.
By: | May 24, 2016 • 5 min read
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Today’s market offers captive insurance companies a particularly advantageous time to upgrade their investment portfolios. However, they must be willing to give up unrewarding practices in favor of more ambitious opportunities.

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“Simply put, it’s a buyer’s market,” said Boston-based Josh Stirling, managing director and senior vice president, U.S. insurance, Sanford C. Bernstein & Co. “If you’re a captive owner, it’s probably a good time to buy more reinsurance or buy down your deductible or self-insured retention.”

In this environment, Stirling said, captive buyers are seeing more competition from reinsurers and primary companies that want to help them manage their risks, offering them favorable coverage at lower prices.

“With pressure from carriers and reinsurers to compete for business, this provides captive buyers and their brokers substantial leverage to negotiate for better value with their risk-taking partners,” Stirling said.

“If you’re a captive owner, it’s probably a good time to buy more reinsurance or buy down your deductible or self-insured retention.” — Josh Stirling, managing director and senior vice president, U.S. insurance, Sanford C. Bernstein & Co.

“This will lead to more opportunities for brokers to create value by partnering with carriers and reinsurers to design new coverages to better protect captives,” he said.

Added Gary Greene, Franklin, Tenn.-based Raymond James & Associates senior vice president-investments and managing director: “Captives of all sizes need to have an asset strategy, and ‘parking’ cash in the bank is not an asset strategy.

“Captive owners tend to hyper-focus on their liabilities and miss the opportunities with their assets. In doing so, they run the risk that their assets are misaligned and may increase overall risk.”

Greene noted that, overall, he believed prospects for captive growth remain favorable.

Asset Strategies

But given that interest rates have remained subdued since 2008, many captives have experienced an interest income shortfall from their actuarial forecast, Greene said.

“As these shortfalls have persisted,” Greene said, “captives found themselves recognizing the importance of developing an appropriate asset investment strategy that complements their liabilities.”

Captive owners generally remain cautious about accepting investment risk, yet they find the option of sitting in cash unpalatable, Greene said.

“So we see captives moving cash away from bank accounts and into low-to-moderate-risk investments,” he said. “Things like government and corporate bonds, with some captives venturing into diversified equities portfolios.”

Tim DePriest, managing director, Arthur J. Gallagher & Co.

Tim DePriest, managing director, Arthur J. Gallagher & Co.

Tim DePriest, Glendale, Calif.-based managing director for Arthur J. Gallagher & Co., noted that a captive should have in place an appropriate level of excess insurance to protect the group should a large catastrophic loss occur, or if over the course of the year the aggregate dollar amount of losses exhausts the premium that has been collected.

“Transparency is very important in running a captive effectively,” DePriest said. “Members should be privy to the inner workings of the captive, such as service costs and the revenue that is derived by the administrator or broker, as well as regulatory requirements.

“Members are essentially ‘owners’ of the captive and therefore should understand their investment.”

DePriest also offered some advice on domiciles.

“Vermont and Bermuda in particular are attractive because of their favorable regulatory and tax environment,” he said.

“While other states in the U.S. are exploring ways to make themselves more attractive for captives, they do not see captive programs as a growth area.”

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Sanford C. Bernstein’s Stirling said that one area for captives to explore in today’s market is working closely with brokers to take advantage of new sources of capital.

“For example,” Stirling said, “captives might consider going to the alternative markets and issuing a CAT bond, such as that issued by New York’s MTA after Hurricane Sandy, and captives with long-tailed reserves might look to partner with alternative managers offering reserve financings that allow the captive owner to profit from the alternative manager’s lower cost of capital.”

Stirling emphasized that, with the market in such a changing environment, it’s a very important time for someone who runs a large captive with a lot of money at risk, to optimize their product to take advantage of the low cost of capital that’s coming into the industry.

Bespoke Cyber Coverage

Raymond James’ Greene said that, “As our world expands, companies are being exposed to new kinds of risk that the commercial market doesn’t have the history to price efficiently.”

Gary Greene, senior vice president -investments and managing director, Raymond James & Associates

Gary Greene, senior vice president -investments and managing director, Raymond James & Associates

He cited cyber risk as a prime example.

“Cyber risk insurance is tremendously expensive to purchase, so very few companies, captives among them, are fully covered,” Greene said. “New technological developments are changing the way we live. Driverless cars, 3D printing, nanotechnology all promise an exciting future, but they also alter the environment for risk.

“But a captive insurance company can be a great vehicle to finance cyber risk,” Greene added. “Since the captive is a private insurance company insuring risk only for the parent company, the captive can structure a bespoke coverage that specifically fits the parent company and charge an appropriate premium based upon the company’s actual risk mitigation policies.”

“As our world expands, companies are being exposed to new kinds of risk that the commercial market doesn’t have the history to price efficiently.” —  Gary Greene, senior vice president-investments and managing director, Raymond James & Associates.

Additionally, if the parent does a good job managing the risk, they can potentially see return of those premiums back to the parent, Greene said.

He also noted that there is one major hurdle on the near-term horizon that will significantly change the way many captives operate.

That hurdle, said Greene, has a date: Oct. 14, 2016.

“As we have seen, captives have a propensity to avoid investment risk by maintaining very high levels of cash-type investments,” he said. “A favorite cash alternative investment has been money market funds. Captives have long used these funds because of their perceived stability and safety.”

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But on Oct. 14, new regulations will go into effect that will significantly change the way money market funds operate, and in turn how many captives handle their investments, Greene said.

“These changes include requiring money market funds’ values to float like any other mutual fund,” he said.

“Additionally, money market funds may impose redemption fees or so-called ‘liquidity gates’ that could be triggered if the liquidity levels of a specific fund fell to specified levels.

“Developing a strategy to deal with these events is going to be a challenge for many captives.” &

Steve Yahn is a freelance writer based in New York. He has more than 40 years of financial reporting and editing experience. He can be reached at [email protected]
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Sponsored: Liberty Mutual Insurance

Commercial Auto Warning: Emerging Frequency and Severity Trends Threaten Policyholders

Commercial auto policyholders should consider utilizing a consultative approach and tools to better manage their transportation exposures.
By: | June 1, 2016 • 6 min read

The slow but steady climb out of the Great Recession means businesses can finally transition out of survival mode and set their sights on growth and expansion.

The construction, retail and energy sectors in particular are enjoying an influx of business — but getting back on their feet doesn’t come free of challenges.

Increasingly, expensive commercial auto losses hamper the upward trend. From 2012 to 2015, auto loss costs increased a cumulative 20 percent, according to the Insurance Services Office.

“Since the recession ended, commercial auto losses have challenged businesses trying to grow,” said David Blessing, SVP and Chief Underwriting Officer for National Insurance Casualty at Liberty Mutual Insurance. “As the economy improves and businesses expand, it means there are more vehicles on the road covering more miles. That is pushing up the frequency of auto accidents.”

For companies with transportation exposure, costly auto losses can hinder continued growth. Buyers who partner closely with their insurance brokers and carriers to understand these risks – and the consultative support and tools available to manage them – are better positioned to protect their employees, fleets, and businesses.

Liberty Mutual’s David Blessing discusses key challenges in the commercial auto market.

LM_SponsoredContent“Since the recession ended, commercial auto losses have challenged businesses trying to grow. As the economy improves and businesses expand, it means there are more vehicles on the road covering more miles. That is pushing up the frequency of auto accidents.”
–David Blessing, SVP and Chief Underwriting Officer for National Insurance Casualty, Liberty Mutual Insurance

More Accidents, More Dollars

Rising claims costs typically stem from either increased frequency or severity — but in the case of commercial auto, it’s both. This presents risk managers with the unique challenge of blunting a double-edged sword.

Cumulative miles driven in February, 2016, were up 5.6 percent compared to February, 2015, Blessing said. Unfortunately, inexperienced drivers are at the helm for a good portion of those miles.

A severe shortage of experienced commercial drivers — nearing 50,000 by the end of 2015, according to the American Trucking Association — means a limited pool to choose from. Drivers completing unfamiliar routes or lacking practice behind the wheel translate into more accidents, but companies facing intense competition for experienced drivers with good driving records may be tempted to let risk management best practices slip, like proper driver screening and training.

Distracted driving, whether it’s as a result of using a phone, eating, or reading directions, is another factor contributing to the number of accidents on the road. Recent findings from the National Safety Council indicate that as much as 27% of crashes involved drivers talking or texting on cell phones.

The factors driving increased frequency in the commercial auto market.

In addition to increased frequency, a variety of other factors are driving up claim severity, resulting in higher payments for both bodily injury and property damage.

Treating those injured in a commercial auto accident is more expensive than ever as medical costs rise at a faster rate than the overall Consumer Price Index.

“Medical inflation continues to go up by about three percent, whereas the core CPI is closer to two percent,” Blessing said.

Changing physical medicine fee schedules in some states also drive up commercial auto claim costs. California, for example, increased the cost of physical medicine by 38 percent over the past two years and will increase it by a total of 64 percent by the end of 2017.

And then there is the cost of repairing and replacing damaged vehicles.

“There are a lot of new vehicles on the road, and those cost more to repair and replace,” Blessing said. “In the last few years, heavy truck sales have increased at double digit rates — 15 percent in 2014, followed by an additional 11 percent in 2015.”

The impact is seen in the industry-wide combined ratio for commercial auto coverage, which per Conning, increased from 103 in 2014 to 105 for 2015, and is forecast to grow to nearly 110 by 2018.

None of these trends show signs of slowing or reversing, especially as the advent of driverless technology introduces its own risks and makes new vehicles all the more valuable. Now is the time to reign in auto exposure, before the cost of claims balloons even further.

The factors driving up commercial auto claims severity.

Data Opens Window to Driver Behavior

To better manage the total cost of commercial auto insurance, Blessing believes risk management should focus on the driver, not just the vehicle. In this journey, fleet telematics data plays a key role, unlocking insight on the driver behavior that contributes to accidents.

“Roughly half of large fleets have telematics built into their trucks,” Blessing said. “Traditionally, they are used to improve business performance by managing maintenance and routing to better control fuel costs. But we see opportunity there to improve driver performance, and so do risk managers.”

Liberty Mutual’s Managing Vital Driver Performance tool helps clients parse through data provided by telematics vendors and apply it toward cultivating safer driving habits.

“Risk managers can get overwhelmed with all of the data coming out of telematics. They may not know how to set the right parameters, or they get too many alerts from the provider,” Blessing said.

“We can help take that data and turn it into a concrete plan of action the customer can use to build a better risk management program by monitoring driver behavior, identifying the root causes of poor driving performance and developing training and other approaches to improve performance.”

Actions risk managers can take to better manage commercial auto frequency and severity trends.

Rather than focusing on the vehicle, the Managing Vital Driver Performance tool focuses on the driver, looking for indicators of aggressive driving that may lead to accidents, such as speeding, sharp turns and hard or sudden braking.

The tool helps a risk manager see if drivers consistently exhibit any of these behaviors, and take actions to improve driving performance before an accident happens. Liberty’s risk control consultants can also interview drivers to drill deeper into the data and find out what causes those behaviors in the first place.

Sometimes patterns of unsafe driving reveal issues at the management level.

“Our behavior-based program is also for supervisors and managers, not just drivers,” Blessing said. “This is where we help them set the tone and expectations with their drivers.”

For example, if data analysis and interviews reveal that fatigue factors into poor driving performance, management can identify ways to address that fatigue, including changing assigned work levels and requirements.  Are drivers expected to make too many deliveries in a single shift, or are they required to interact with dispatch while driving?

“Management support of safety is so important, and work levels and expectations should be realistic,” Blessing said.

A Consultative Approach

In addition to its Managing Vital Driver Performance tool, Liberty’s team of risk control consultants helps commercial auto policyholders establish screening criteria for new drivers, creating a “driver scorecard” to reflect a potential new hire’s driving record, any Motor Vehicle Reports, years of experience, and familiarity with the type of vehicle that a company uses.

“Our whole approach is consultative,” Blessing said. “We probe and listen and try to understand a client’s strengths and challenges, and then make recommendations to help them establish the best practices they need.”

“With our approach and tools, we do something no one else in the industry does, which is perform the root cause analysis to help prevent accidents, better protecting a commercial auto policyholder’s employees and bottom line.”

To learn more, visit https://business.libertymutualgroup.com/business-insurance/coverages/commercial-auto-insurance-policy.

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This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with Liberty Mutual Insurance. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.


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Liberty Mutual Insurance offers a wide range of insurance products and services, including general liability, property, commercial automobile, excess casualty, workers compensation and group benefits.
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