2016 Power Broker

Power Broker Rising Stars

The class of 2016 impresses with its size and quality.
By: and | March 1, 2016 • 3 min read

Judging the talent employed by commercial insurance brokers leads us to one conclusion; optimism is the order of the day.

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As we discovered this year, not only are the ranks of high-achieving younger brokers as strong as ever, they are increasing in number.

We’ve renamed our Power Broker® “Under 40” category to “Rising Stars” to better celebrate this wave of talent and to focus on an important point. Yes, this is a younger group of professionals, all of them under 40, but it’s more on point to think of them as the future leaders of this profession.

As Power Broker® winners and finalists, this set of Rising Stars demonstrated a superior level of creativity in finding solutions for their clients, unflagging customer service and a devotion to learning more about their industry.

Just four years ago, the number of brokers honored by this designation hovered around 40. Last, year, there were 54 Power Broker® winners and finalists recognized in the Under 40 category.

Over the next few pages, you will see the names and affiliations of 77 brokers we recognize as Rising Stars. Since the launch of this category in 2009, more than 250 brokers under 40 received the designation.

The average age of the Rising Stars designees is 36. They represent a powerful wave of talent that is bolstering a profession, which like many other professions will be challenged to replace talent as the baby boomers retire.

For this group of Rising Stars, a career in commercial insurance brokerage is a compelling challenge that results in rich rewards.

“I really enjoy telling ‘the story’ on behalf of my client to the insurance carrier, to pique their interest in an account,” — Ashley De Paola, assistant vice president, Alliant

We first came to know Lockton’s Christopher Keith when he broke into the Power Broker® ranks as a winner in the Workers’ Compensation category in February 2013.

In those days, Keith worked for the Philadelphia-based Graham Co. Keith, 39, said it’s the “entrepreneurial” nature of the business that he finds so rewarding.

“I like the fact that I am managing my own profit and loss statement,” said Keith, who this year achieved Power Broker® status in the Aviation category.

Ashley De Paola, assistant vice president, Alliant

Ashley De Paola, assistant vice president, Alliant

At Lockton’s annual President’s Dinner, he was recognized as the “prototype” Lockton producer.

“I’m very proud of that,” he said.

Alliant’s Ashley De Paola, 33, a 2016 Power Broker® in the Real Estate category, said it’s the quick-paced, evolving atmosphere of commercial insurance brokerage that excites her.

“I really enjoy telling ‘the story’ on behalf of my client to the insurance carrier, to pique their interest in an account,” De Paola said.

Earlier in her career, a client expressed his concern over her age and experience. Her review of his insurance program changed his mind.

“It was very rewarding when he later asked me to work on his business,” she said.

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Beecher Carlson’s Joe Roberta, a 2016 Power Broker® winner in the Private Equity category, has several reasons he likes working in this industry. Top of the list is that this is a very “social industry.”

“I truly enjoy working with people that I’ve been fortunate enough to build long-term relationships with,” he said.

Justin Wiley, 32, Power Broker® winner in the Public Sector category, works for Arthur J. Gallagher & Co., which prides itself on its mentoring efforts.

The company sent Wiley to Orlando, Fla., to work with veteran Rich Terlecki, himself a multiple Power Broker® winner.

“My goal was to learn and gather from him as much intellectual capital as possible,” Wiley said.

Clearly, Terlecki taught him well.

The 2016 Power Broker® Rising Stars

Morgan Anderson, 38 Arthur J. Gallagher Irvine, Calif. Real Estate

Morgan Anderson, 38
Arthur J. Gallagher
Irvine, Calif.
Real Estate

Peter Ballas, 33 Aon Morristown, N.J. At-large

Peter Ballas, 33
Aon
Morristown, N.J.
At-large

Brooke Barnett, 37 Marsh Los Angeles Entertainment

Brooke Barnett, 37
Marsh
Los Angeles
Entertainment

Herman Brito Jr., 26 Marsh New York Marine

Herman Brito Jr., 26
Marsh
New York
Marine

John Byers, 34 Aon Franklin, Tenn. Employee Benefits

John Byers, 34
Aon
Franklin, Tenn.
Employee Benefits

Sandy Carter, 32 Beecher Carlson Atlanta Automotive

Sandy Carter, 32
Beecher Carlson
Atlanta
Automotive

Brandon Cole, 31 Arthur J. Gallagher Irvine, Calif. Nonprofit

Brandon Cole, 31
Arthur J. Gallagher
Irvine, Calif.
Nonprofit

Edward Conlon, 37 Aon New York Financial Institutions

Edward Conlon, 37
Aon
New York
Financial Institutions

Chris Connelly, 32 Arthur J. Gallagher Orlando, Fla. Public Sector

Chris Connelly, 32
Arthur J. Gallagher
Orlando, Fla.
Public Sector

Anne Corona, 38 Aon San Francisco Technology

Anne Corona, 38
Aon
San Francisco
Technology

Cara Cortes, 35 Aon Pittsburgh At-large

Cara Cortes, 35
Aon
Pittsburgh
At-large

Uri Dallal, 37 Aon New York Financial Institutions

Uri Dallal, 37
Aon
New York
Financial Institutions

Ashley De Paola, 33 Alliant New York Real Estate

Ashley De Paola, 33
Alliant
New York
Real Estate

Brian Dougal, 38 Aon San Francisco Real Estate

Brian Dougal, 38
Aon
San Francisco
Real Estate

Justin Dove, 29 Arthur J. Gallagher San Francisco Real Estate

Justin Dove, 29
Arthur J. Gallagher
San Francisco
Real Estate

Patrick Drake, 27 Aon Southfield, Mich. Utilities, Alternative

Patrick Drake, 27
Aon
Southfield, Mich.
Utilities, Alternative

Dan Edelstein, 37 Willis Towers Watson New York Manufacturing

Dan Edelstein, 37
Willis Towers Watson
New York
Manufacturing

Tim Farward, 36 Marsh Philadelphia Utilities, traditional

Tim Farward, 36
Marsh
Philadelphia
Utilities, traditional

Larissa Gallagher, 28 Aon Southfield, Mich. Manufacturing

Larissa Gallagher, 28
Aon
Southfield, Mich.
Manufacturing

Dominic Gallina, 39 Aon New York Real Estate

Dominic Gallina, 39
Aon
New York
Real Estate

Kevin Garvey, 37 Aon Cleveland Automotive

Kevin Garvey, 37
Aon
Cleveland
Automotive

Matthew Giambagno, 26 Marsh, New York Energy/Downstream

Matthew Giambagno, 26
Marsh, New York
Energy/Downstream

Blake Giannisis, 36 Aon New York Real Estate

Blake Giannisis, 36
Aon
New York
Real Estate

George Gionis, 33 Aon Philadelphia At-large

George Gionis, 33
Aon
Philadelphia
At-large

Debbie Goldstine, 39 Lockton Chicago Manufacturing

Debbie Goldstine, 39
Lockton
Chicago
Manufacturing

Sarah Goodman, 36 Marsh New York Pharma/Life Sciences

Sarah Goodman, 36
Marsh
New York
Pharma/Life Sciences

Jessica Govic, 30 Arthur J. Gallagher Itasca, Ill. Public Sector

Jessica Govic, 30
Arthur J. Gallagher
Itasca, Ill.
Public Sector

Robert Hale, 39 Aon London Utilities, traditional

Robert Hale, 39
Aon
London
Utilities, traditional

Joshua Halpern, 34 Aon New York Private Equity

Joshua Halpern, 34
Aon
New York
Private Equity

Matthew Heinz, 39 Aon New York Private Equity

Matthew Heinz, 39
Aon
New York
Private Equity

Charlie Herr, 25 Arthur J. Gallagher Kansas City, Mo. Education

Charlie Herr, 25
Arthur J. Gallagher
Kansas City, Mo.
Education

Blythe Hogan, 31 Aon New York Fine Arts

Blythe Hogan, 31
Aon
New York
Fine Arts

James Jackson, 35 Willis Towers Watson New York Financial Institutions

James Jackson, 35
Willis Towers Watson
New York
Financial Institutions

Sarah Johnson Court, 35 Aon, Miami Fine Arts

Sarah Johnson Court, 35
Aon, Miami
Fine Arts

Christopher Keith, 39 Lockton Blue Bell, Pa. Aviation & Aerospace

Christopher Keith, 39
Lockton
Blue Bell, Pa.
Aviation & Aerospace

Charlie King, 36 Alliant Houston Energy/Upstream

Charlie King, 36
Alliant
Houston
Energy/Upstream

Jonathan Kosin, 37 Aon Southfield, Mich. Construction

Jonathan Kosin, 37
Aon
Southfield, Mich.
Construction

Tyler LaMantia, 29 Arthur J. Gallagher Itasca, Ill. Education

Tyler LaMantia, 29
Arthur J. Gallagher
Itasca, Ill.
Education

Jeanna Madlener, 37 Wells Fargo Portland, Ore. At-large

Jeanna Madlener, 37
Wells Fargo
Portland, Ore.
At-large

 Kimberly Mann, 27 Marsh Philadelphia Environmental


Kimberly Mann, 27
Marsh
Philadelphia
Environmental

Kristina Marcigliano, 27 DeWitt Stern New York Fine Arts

Kristina Marcigliano, 27
DeWitt Stern
New York
Fine Arts

 Matt Medeiros, 34 Arthur J. Gallagher Media, Pa. Retail


Matt Medeiros, 34
Arthur J. Gallagher
Media, Pa.
Retail

Mary Mulhern, 33 Marsh Chicago Health Care

Mary Mulhern, 33
Marsh
Chicago
Health Care

Dennis Nevinski, 31 Aon Chicago Aviation & Aerospace

Dennis Nevinski, 31
Aon
Chicago
Aviation & Aerospace

Lee Newmark, 28 Arthur J. Gallagher Itasca, Ill. Health Care

Lee Newmark, 28
Arthur J. Gallagher
Itasca, Ill.
Health Care

Jake Onken, 26 Aon Houston Health Care

Jake Onken, 26
Aon
Houston
Health Care

Joanna Paredes, 28 Rekerdres & Sons Dallas Marine

Joanna Paredes, 28
Rekerdres & Sons
Dallas
Marine

Stephen Pasdiora, 27 Cottingham & Butler Rosemont, Ill. Employee Benefits

Stephen Pasdiora, 27
Cottingham & Butler
Rosemont, Ill.
Employee Benefits

Stefanie Pearl, 35 Marsh New York Financial Institutions

Stefanie Pearl, 35
Marsh
New York
Financial Institutions

Jason Peery, 37 Aon Newport Beach, Calif. Real Estate

Jason Peery, 37
Aon
Newport Beach, Calif.
Real Estate

Adrian Pellen, 32 Aon Chicago Construction

Adrian Pellen, 32
Aon
Chicago
Construction

Chris Rafferty, 36 Aon Chicago Manufacturing

Chris Rafferty, 36
Aon
Chicago
Manufacturing

Daniel R’bibo, 36 Arthur J. Gallagher Glendale, Calif. Entertainment

Daniel R’bibo, 36
Arthur J. Gallagher
Glendale, Calif.
Entertainment

Brent Rieth, 30 Aon San Francisco Technology

Brent Rieth, 30
Aon
San Francisco
Technology

 Joe Roberta, 35 Beecher Carlson New York Private Equity


Joe Roberta, 35
Beecher Carlson
New York
Private Equity

Robert Rosenzweig, 30 Risk Strategies New York Technology

Robert Rosenzweig, 30
Risk Strategies
New York
Technology

 Patrick Roth, 35 Aon Denver Pharma/Life Sciences


Patrick Roth, 35
Aon
Denver
Pharma/Life Sciences

 Laura Rubin, 33 Beecher Carlson Boston Utilities, Alternative


Laura Rubin, 33
Beecher Carlson
Boston
Utilities, Alternative

 Ian Schwartz,31 Aon Los Angeles Real Estate


Ian Schwartz,31
Aon
Los Angeles
Real Estate

Christopher Shorter, 36 Aon Houston Energy/Downstream

Christopher Shorter, 36
Aon
Houston
Energy/Downstream

Brian Simons, 34 Aon New York Financial Institutions

Brian Simons, 34
Aon
New York
Financial Institutions

Andrew Smith, 28 Marsh New York Marine

Andrew Smith, 28
Marsh
New York
Marine

Timothy Sullivan, 38 Willis Towers Watson Boston Financial Institutions

Timothy Sullivan, 38
Willis Towers Watson
Boston
Financial Institutions

Kurt Thoennessen, 37 Ericson Ins. Advisors Washington Depot, Conn. Private Client

Kurt Thoennessen, 37
Ericson Ins. Advisors
Washington Depot, Conn.
Private Client

 John Tomlinson, 37 Lockton Encino, Calif. Entertainment


John Tomlinson, 37
Lockton
Encino, Calif.
Entertainment

 Kaitlin Upchurch, 30 Wortham Houston At-large


Kaitlin Upchurch, 30
Wortham
Houston
At-large

 Liz Van Dervort, 30 Gillis, Ellis & Baker New Orleans Nonprofit


Liz Van Dervort, 30
Gillis, Ellis & Baker
New Orleans
Nonprofit

 Rene Van Winden, 36 Aon Houston Energy/Downstream


Rene Van Winden, 36
Aon
Houston
Energy/Downstream

Ben Von Obstfelder, 30 Aon Wauconda, Ill. Retail

Ben Von Obstfelder, 30
Aon
Wauconda, Ill.
Retail

Michael Walsh, 35 Marsh Boston Real Estate

Michael Walsh, 35
Marsh
Boston
Real Estate

Emily Weiss, 29 DeWitt Stern New York Fine Arts

Emily Weiss, 29
DeWitt Stern
New York
Fine Arts

Jeremiah White, 38 Aon Frederick, Md. Transportation

Jeremiah White, 38
Aon
Frederick, Md.
Transportation

 Joshua White, 28 Gulfshore Insurance Naples, Fla. Private Client


Joshua White, 28
Gulfshore Insurance
Naples, Fla.
Private Client

Casey Wigglesworth, 37 Aon Washington, DC Fine Arts

Casey Wigglesworth, 37
Aon
Washington, DC
Fine Arts

 Justin Wiley, 33 Arthur J. Gallagher Orlando, Fla. Public Sector


Justin Wiley, 33
Arthur J. Gallagher
Orlando, Fla.
Public Sector

Wendy Wu, 38 Aon Shanghai Automotive

Wendy Wu, 38
Aon
Shanghai
Automotive

Susan Young, 30 Marsh Seattle Retail

Susan Young, 30
Marsh
Seattle
Retail

Dan Reynolds is editor-in-chief of Risk & Insurance®. He can be reached at [email protected] Tom Starner, a freelance journalist, can be reached at [email protected]
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2016 Power Broker

At Large

Clout in the Market

Cara Cortes Vice President Aon, Pittsburgh

Cara Cortes
Vice President
Aon, Pittsburgh

Few things are more important to boards of directors and corporate officers than directors and officers coverage – and that is where Aon’s Cara Cortes excels.

One private equity portfolio company needed D&O coverage at the end of the month. They couldn’t get an extension and an application had yet to be filled out.

Two days before coverage expired, the company asked Chip Gutshall, CEO of Work Comp Strategic Solutions, another of the portfolio companies, for help. He immediately called Cortes, who raced to the rescue.

“She got a 60-day extension for the application,” Gutshall said. “That was awesome. She carries a lot of clout within the market to pull something like that off.”

Cortes has also been extremely helpful in D&O and employment practices liability claims, he said.

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“I wouldn’t trade her for anyone,” he said.

A risk manager in the Midwest said that Cortes “does a great job at matching up our exposure, our risk, with the best potential partners.

“We were able to significantly improve the coverage in several respects and to reduce the cost beyond what the [soft] market was.”

Cortes’ assistance with cyber coverage for St. Clair Hospital was what stood out the most for Linda Lattner, corporate compliance officer at the hospital.

Longstanding Expertise

Craig Howser Executive Vice President Alliant, Chicago

Craig Howser
Executive Vice President
Alliant, Chicago

There’s a limited market for professional lawyer liability, and Craig Howser is an expert at searching out the best specialized coverage for his clients.

“He’s at the top of my list as a business partner for our firm,” said Judy Vetkoetter, executive director of Gardere Wynne Sewell.

“He is really on top of our business and the kinds of challenges the legal industry faces. He is very connected and resourceful as far as market options go. I sing his praises.”

Instead of market-driven premium increases at renewal, Howser has been able to point out to underwriters the uniqueness of Gardere’s effective risk management to put together a solution that lowered the firm’s self-insured retention.

He is also a strategic thinker, introducing Gardere to new underwriters even when there wasn’t an immediate need. That approach paid off a few years ago when a previous lead underwriter decided to change its approach to insuring large law firms.

Howser assisted the Gibbons PC law firm when it left a captive program it had been with for 25 years and entered the commercial marketplace.

“We have saved millions and millions of dollars in premiums over the past few years,” said Patrick Dunican, chairman and managing director.

In addition, the firm’s coverage was broadened by a manuscripted policy form that included possible future exposures such as cyber liability or data breaches.

On the Cutting Edge

Randy Nornes Executive Vice President Aon, Chicago

Randy Nornes
Executive Vice President
Aon, Chicago

The risks and exposures of companies in the new sharing economy receive significant media attention and face uncertain regulatory demands.

Although many insurers steer clear of such high-profile risks, Randy Nornes was able to do “extraordinary work” in helping one such company gain the coverage it needed, according to a risk executive at a sharing economy company.

“He was really, really good. He is No. 1,” said the executive. “I can’t give you a lot of detail but he was able to help us develop things in the market from scratch from financial structure to policy writing.

“He connected us with the right resources to create something that the market was not very open to getting involved with,” he said.

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“His most important asset was to help insurers get comfortable with the risk,” the executive said.

And Nornes is constantly available. “He is like an ER, working 24/7. It is outstanding customer service.”

Nornes is also a crucial asset in helping clients and insurers better understand the risks associated with the Internet of Things. IoT risks are broader than the privacy, reputational and liability exposures typically included in cyber coverage, as IoT also includes physical risks.

One of the Team

Michael Falvey Executive Vice President Willis Towers Watson, Norfolk, Va.

Michael Falvey
Executive Vice President
Willis Towers Watson, Norfolk, Va.

Weis Markets Inc. lost its risk manager this year, but rather than replacing the position, it relied more heavily on the expertise and knowledge of Michael Falvey.

“He really goes above and beyond the normal insurance broker,” said Chris De Tray, director, safety and risk management, Weis Markets.

In addition to placing insurance and shepherding renewals, Falvey is “the best business partner out there,” helping Weis proactively deal with risk management concerns, including vendor risk transfer and safety reviews.

“He absolutely is an extension of our department and understands what our model is. He does a very, very good job of making sure we are not at risk,” De Tray said.

For the Virginia Port Authority, Falvey helped Chris Harrell, vice president, contracts and risk management, rebuild the insurance program “from the bottom up. When I say the program, I mean 3,000 employees, six marine terminals and every policy you can think of from executive liability coverage to auto to human resources to ships on terminal.

“When we rebuilt it, it consolidated a lot of things,” he said. “It was a big value add.”

Marti Dickman, vice president, risk management, ADS Waste Holdings Inc., said “the quality and level of performance we get from Michael is exceptional.”

Active in acquisitions, ADS has been challenged with the structure and poor claims history of some legacy programs.

Responsive and Knowledgeable

Jeanna Madlener Vice President, Senior Sales Executive Wells Fargo Insurance, Portland, Ore.

Jeanna Madlener
Vice President, Senior Sales Executive
Wells Fargo Insurance, Portland, Ore.

Whether it’s addressing workers’ comp issues or the diverse needs of nonprofit organizations, Jeanna Madlener is creative, responsive and knowledgeable.

“Jeanna is tremendous,” said Vincent Salvi, risk and compliance manager at Northwest Evaluation Association (NWEA), which provides educational services to associations worldwide.

The insurance requirements from some schools can be “quite unusual,” he said, but Madlener resourcefully helps NWEA work through those challenges.

Two challenges affecting The Dussin Group, whose restaurant portfolio includes the Old Spaghetti Factory, were workers’ compensation and letters of credit, said Dean Griffith, president.

“Our outstanding letters of credit were frustrating to us,” he said, noting that Madlener “worked very hard to get those down.”

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She was also instrumental in collaborating with the company’s medical provider to take responsibility for an expensive workers’ comp claim with reserves in excess of $250,000. The loss was decreased to just over $25,000, reducing the impact to Dussin Group’s premium expenses by more than 15 percent over the next three years.

Scrutinizing safety issues is also crucial, Griffith said. The company doesn’t want “rainbows and sunshine” from her store audits, he said. “A safe work environment is not just great on the cost side, but also for our people.”

Navigating Cyber Policies

Kaitlin Upchurch Managing Director Wortham, Houston

Kaitlin Upchurch
Managing Director
Wortham, Houston

Placing cyber policies is a complex undertaking, but for retail and health care organizations, that task is significantly more demanding. Kaitlin Upchurch nails it.

“She is just very, very good,” said Margot Roth-L’Heureux, global director of risk management, Whole Foods Market Inc. “She did a tremendous job.

“As anyone in the insurance world knows, cyber is not easy for anybody in retail,” she said. “You have to count on your broker to structure your program correctly and manage your expectations.

“Cyber has a lot of visibility with your officers and board right now. She brought good candidates to the table and different configurations for not only the best way to use money in our budget but to get us the best coverage,” Roth-L’Heureux said.

James Banfield, director of risk management/associate general counsel at Baylor College of Medicine, echoed those sentiments.

After years of self-insuring, Baylor wanted to explore going to market for cyber coverage. Upchurch took the lead, offering information and helping Baylor complete the “fairly extraordinary” applications.

When Baylor was dismayed about the prospect of completing each insurer’s separate application, Upchurch was able to convince the insurers to use a common document, with Baylor providing additional information if needed.

BlackBar

Finalists:

George Gionis, Account Executive, Aon

George Gionis, Account Executive, Aon

Thomas Sewell, Senior Vice President, Insurance Brokering Executive, Wells Fargo Insurance

Thomas Sewell, Senior Vice President, Insurance Brokering Executive, Wells Fargo Insurance

Patrick Walsh, Regional Executive Vice President, Arthur J. Gallagher

Patrick Walsh, Regional Executive Vice President, Arthur J. Gallagher

Peter Ballas CISR, Senior Broker, Aon

Peter Ballas
CISR, Senior Broker, Aon

Timothy Egan Senior Vice President, NY Global Property, Willis Towers Watson

Timothy Egan
Senior Vice President, Global Property, Willis Towers Watson, NY

 

 

 

 

 

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Sponsored: Lexington Insurance

Handling Heavy Equipment Risk with Expertise

Large and complex risks require a sophisticated claims approach. Partner with an insurer who has the underwriting and claims expertise to handle such large claims.
By: | August 4, 2016 • 5 min read
SponsoredContent_Lex_0816

What happens to a construction project when a crane gets damaged?

Everything comes to a halt. Cranes are critical tools on the job site, and such heavy equipment is not quickly or easily replaceable. If one goes out of commission, it imperils the project’s timeline and potentially its budget.

Crane values can range from less than $1 million to more than $10 million. Insuring them is challenging not just because of their value, but because of the risks associated with transporting them to the job site.

“Cranes travel on a flatbed truck, and anything can happen on the road, so the exposure is very broad. This complicates coverage for cranes and other pieces of heavy equipment,” said Rich Clarke, Assistant Vice President, Marine Heavy Equipment, Lexington Insurance, a member of AIG.

On the jobsite, operator error is the most common cause of a loss. While employee training is the best way to minimize the risk, all the training in the world can’t prevent every accident.

“Simple mistakes like forgetting to put the outrigger down or setting the load capacity incorrectly can lead to a lot of damage,” Clarke said.

Crane losses can easily top $1 million in physical damage alone, not including the costs of lost business income.

“Many insurers are not comfortable covering a single piece of equipment valued over $1 million,” Clarke said.

A large and complex risk requires a sophisticated claims approach. Lexington Insurance, backed by the resources and capabilities of AIG, has the underwriting and claims expertise to handle such large claims.

SponsoredContent_Lex_0816“Cranes travel on a flatbed truck, and anything can happen on the road, so the exposure is very broad. This complicates coverage for cranes and other pieces of heavy equipment. Simple mistakes like forgetting to put the outrigger down or setting the load capacity incorrectly can lead to a lot of damage.”
— Rich Clarke, Assistant Vice President, Marine Heavy Equipment, Lexington Insurance

Flexibility in Underwriting and Claims

Treating insureds as partners in the policy-building and claims process helps to fine-tune coverage to fit the risk and gets all parties on the same page.

Internally, a close relationship between underwriting and claims teams facilitates that partnership and results in a smoother claims process for both insurer and insured.

“Our underwriters and claims examiners work together with the broker and insured to gain a better understanding of their risk and their coverage expectations before we even issue a policy,” said Michelle Sipple, Senior Vice President, Property, Lexington Insurance. “This helps us tailor our policies or claims handling to suit their needs.”

“The shared goals and commonality between underwriting and claims help us provide the most for our clients,” Clarke said.

Establishing familiarity and trust between client, claims, and underwriting helps to ensure that policy wording is clear and reflects the expectations of all parties — and that insureds know who to contact in the event of a loss.

Lexington’s claims and underwriting experts who specialize in heavy equipment will meet with a client before they buy coverage, during a claim, or any time in between. It is important for both claims and underwriting to have face time with insured so that everyone is working toward the same goals.

When there is a loss, designated adjusters stay in contact throughout the life of a claim.

Maintaining consistent communication not only meets a high standard of customer service, but also ensures speed and efficiency when a claim arises.

“We try to educate our clients from the get-go about what we will need from them after a loss, so we can initiate the claim and get the ball rolling right away,” Clarke said. “They are much more comfortable knowing who is helping them when they are trying to recover from a loss, and when it comes to heavy equipment, there’s no time to spare.”

SponsoredContent_Lex_0816“Our underwriters and claims examiners work together with the broker and insured to gain a better understanding of their risk and their coverage expectations before we even issue a policy. This helps us tailor our policies or claims handling to suit their needs.”
— Michelle Sipple, Senior Vice President, Property, Lexington Insurance

Leveraging Industry Expertise

When a claim occurs, independent adjusters and engineers arrive on the scene as quickly as possible to conduct physical inspections of damaged cranes, bringing years of experience and many industry relationships with them.

Lexington has three claims examiners specializing in cranes and heavy equipment. To accommodate time differences among clients’ sites, Lexington’s inland marine operations work out of two central locations on the East and West Coasts – Atlanta, Georgia and Portland, Oregon.

No matter the time zone, examiners can arrive on site quickly.

“Our clients know they need us out there immediately. They know our expertise,” Clarke said. “Our examiners are known as leaders in the industry.”

When a barge crane sustained damage while dismantling an old bridge in the San Francisco Bay that had been cracked by an earthquake, for example, “I got the call at 6 a.m. and we had experts on site by 12 p.m.,” Clarke said.SponsoredContent_Lex_0816

Auxiliary Services

In addition to educating insureds about the claims process and maintaining open lines of communication, Lexington further facilitates the process through AIG’s IntelliRisk® services – a suite of online tools to help policyholders understand their losses and track their claim’s progress.

“Brokers and clients can log in and see status of their claim and find information on their losses and reserves,” Sipple said.

In some situations, Lexington can also come to the rescue for clients in the form of advance payments. If a crane gets damaged, an examiner can conduct a quick inspection and provide a rough estimate of what the total value of the claim might be.

Lexington can then issue 50 percent of that estimate to the insured immediately to help them get moving on repairs or find a replacement. This helps to mitigate business interruption losses, as it normally takes a few weeks to determine the full and final value of the claim and disburse payment.

Again, the skill of the examiners in projecting accurate loss costs makes this possible.

“This is done on a case-by-case basis,” Clarke said. “There’s no guarantee, but if the circumstances are right, we will always try to get that advance payment out to our insureds to ease their financial burden.”

For project managers stymied by an out-of-service crane, these services help to bring halted work back up to speed.

For more information about Lexington’s inland marine services, interested brokers should visit http://www.lexingtoninsurance.com/home.

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This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with Lexington Insurance. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.Advertisement




Lexington Insurance Company, an AIG Company, is the leading U.S.-based surplus lines insurer.
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