Risk Scenario

Midnight Blitz

On Cyber Monday, skilled hackers diminish an online retailer's credibility in mere minutes.
By: | November 13, 2014 • 8 min read
Risk Scenarios are created by Risk & Insurance editors along with leading industry partners. The hypothetical, yet realistic stories, showcase emerging risks that can result in significant losses if not properly addressed.

Disclaimer: The events depicted in this scenario are fictitious. Any similarity to any corporation or person, living or dead, is merely coincidental.

The Citadel

The October 2015 cover of the trade publication Retailer’s World featured a picture of Paul Vitez, general counsel for cloud host Va-Voom!, which rewrote the book on online shopping, making a billionaire of its founder, Teddy Houck.

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In glowing prose, the author of the Retailer’s World cover story related Vitez’ impressive academic record at Haverford College, his background in finance and his role in earning for Va-Voom! the nickname of “The Citadel” for its innovative, committed approach to cyber security.

Employing the “prison, not a castle” approach to cyber security, Vitez and Va-Voom! created “honey- pots” within the Va-Voom! system, decoys which looked like they contained important data but were not actually part of the internal network.

Moving much more swiftly than its competitors, Va-Voom! also spent millions to implement chip and pin credit card technology on its credit cards, a much more secure way to store sensitive financial and personal information than the traditional magnetic strip.

Again with an eye toward short-term investment in operations and a goal of long-term success, Vitez was given carte blanche by Teddy Houck and the Va-Voom! board of directors to spend top dollar for information technology talent that had honed their skills in the high-stakes environments of the CIA and the Department of Defense.

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Partner

From an information technology policy perspective, Va-Voom! was a demanding place to work. Under Vitez’ direction, the use of data encryption was heavily enforced. It also had a strict company policy barring employees from connecting personal devices to any computer equipment owned by Va-Voom! or to its network.

In 2014 and 2015, one by one, major retailers — even banking institutions — were hit by cyber attacks that undermined the public’s faith in those companies, doing serious mid- to long-term damage to their reputations. Retailers that learned only too well the degree to which they were vulnerable to attack found in Va-Voom! a business partner they felt they could trust.

Rather than being dampened by cyber fears, the trend of cyber attacks in 2014 and early 2015 actually increased the number of retailers that wanted to do business with Va-Voom!

The company’s insurance program was something of an anomaly, considering its position in the industry. Starting with a substantial retention, Va-Voom! carried property and professional liability coverage for its employees.

The company considered but never purchased coverage that would substantially indemnify the hundreds of retailers and other service providers that used its services, were Va-Voom! to be the victim of a cyber-security incident. It carried third-party liability insurance, but not as much as you would think a company of its size would carry.

“Really?” Vitez memorably said during a meeting with Steve Francis, the company’s chief risk officer and company CFO Maribel Kelly, when the subject of cyber security indemnification was broached by Va-Voom!’s broker, himself no slouch when it came to these matters.

With an eye to the merciless whims of stock market investors, Vitez and Kelly sided against Steve Francis when he argued that the cost of the premium, though it would put a slight dent in the company’s bottom line on a quarterly basis, was well worth the expense.

“Nobody manages this risk better than we do,” Vitez said, crossing his arms across his chest.

“We can and do own this risk,” he said.

Steve Francis looked at Vitez across the table but didn’t say what he was thinking. What he was thinking was, “You just bit off way more than you can chew, Mr. Haverford.”

Poll Question

Has your company conducted a cyber-security assessment of is information technology infrastructure?

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The Blitz

Just before midnight on Nov. 30, 2015, the Monday after Thanksgiving, known in retailing as Cyber Monday, a highly sophisticated and well-coordinated cyber-attack began, erasing Va-Voom!’s considerable credibility in a matter of minutes.

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Here’s how it unfolded.

At five minutes to midnight, the websites of 10 of the largest retailers that sold on the Va-Voom! site went down. The retailers were so in the dark about what had happened to them that it took hours to put together that the source of the attack was coming from within Va-Voom!’s vaunted information technology system.

Precisely at midnight, unidentified hackers used the stolen e-mail addresses of the 10 retailers’ customers to send Trojan Horses to the personal computers of millions of online shoppers.

The customers didn’t need to click on the e-mails or download attachments to empower the Trojan Horses. After a mere half hour in their inboxes, the e-mails activated a cyber-locking mechanism that shut the users out of their own computers. The only visible content on their screen was the logo of the retailer whose customer information was stolen.

Angry consumers, shut out of their personal computers, pick up their handheld devices to vent their frustration in instant messages and Tweets aimed at the retailers whose logos were frozen on their now-useless computer screens.




Several of the affected companies went public within hours with their conviction that the Trojan Horses that caused so much havoc emanated from the Va-Voom! network.

“Are you seeing this?” said David Cohen, the equally miffed general counsel for one of the retailers, on a phone call with his law school buddy Paul Vitez, as they tried to sort out the hell that had broken loose.

“Yes I’m seeing it,” said Vitez.

Vitez, normally a man of action, but temporarily flummoxed, became as passive as any teenager with a handheld device in their hand as he sat, scrolling through the Tweets and Facebook posts that were savaging the retailers and Va-Voom!

“What are you doing?” Cohen said impatiently when Vitez fell silent.

“Are you playing with your iPhone? We have a serious situation here, Paul!” Cohen said.

“I’m not playing with my iPhone!” Vitez shouted back before putting down his mobile device and trying to regain control of his emotions.

“I know we have a problem David, I know we do,” Vitez said.

But all Vitez could do beyond that was run his hands through his hair, temporarily at a loss as to exactly what to do next.

On the afternoon of December 1, the New York Times published an online story, featuring quotes attributed to Wall Street analysts from the technology and retail sectors, estimating that damage to home computers and lost online retail sales from the coordinated and ongoing cyber attack could potentially exceed $1 billion.

Poll Question

Does your company have in place a crisis management and response plan in the event of a cyber-attack?

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Poll Question

If yes, how often is the plan tested?

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Black Monday and Beyond

In the aftermath of what history and newspaper editors and writers would record as “Black Monday,” Vitez and the rest of the Va-Voom! team tried to take stock of their losses and rally themselves into a recovery. They had a very hard and very expensive road ahead of them.

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Paul Vitez had used the millions accorded to him to create Va-Voom’s “prison, not a castle” approach to cyber defense and he had employed that money in an admirable and innovative fashion.

But it was in a meeting with chief risk officer Steve Francis, CFO Marabel Kelly and Va-Voom!’s technology and general liability broker Brandon Fikes that Paul Vitez came to a better, albeit painful understanding about the best allocation of capital in the quest to manage risk.

The most immediate pain that Va-Voom! was feeling were notices from five attorneys general that investigations into the Black Monday breach were underway.

‘Well, the good news is that your regulatory defense is covered, as is your first party business interruption,” Fikes said.

“Great,” Vitez said. “What else?”

Steve Francis glanced at Vitez out of one corner of his eye. He felt the pain of the losses to the company as badly as anyone, but he couldn’t help but take a bit of perverse pleasure in the discomfort of Vitez, whose arrogance, in Francis’ estimation, was going to have significant consequences, consequences that could be measured in millions of dollars.

“The rest is somewhat of a mixed bag, unfortunately,” Fikes said.

“Go on,” said Vitez who shot Francis a quick sharp look, causing Francis to turn away quickly, lest his inner thoughts become outwardly visible.

“You had some third party liability coverage, but I don’t think it’s going to be enough to cover the losses of your business partners, not to mention the shoppers whose personal computers were damaged by this event,” Fikes said.

“How much …” Vitez managed to get out before Steve Francis stepped in.

“We could have multiples of millions in exposure here, Paul,” Francis said.

Vitez shot Francis another look but Francis diplomatically kept his mouth shut.

“I don’t think we’re ever going to get to the bottom of where this attack came from and who launched it,” said the CFO, Marabel Kelly.

“What’s your advice, Brandon, about spending money on forensics?” she asked.

“I think you spend it for a couple of reasons,” Fikes said.

“One, the cost is covered by insurance. But that’s not the best reason. The best reason is that you can use forensics to learn from the event and hopefully prevent anything else as bad as this going forward,” he said.

“All right,” Kelly said. “What else?”

“There’s reputation,” Steve Francis offered.

“Some say you can put a price on it, some say you can’t,” said Fikes.

“But one thing is for sure,” he said. “You had no coverage in place for that in any event.”

There was a pause, as the significance of that statement sunk in. In the extended, painfully awkward silence, Marabel Kelly shuffled the paperwork in front of her and shifted in her seat, visibly perturbed.

Within two weeks of that difficult conversation, the pain intensified for Paul Vitez and Va-Voom! Class action lawsuits were filed on behalf of the millions of home-computer owners who alleged pain and suffering in connection with the hassle of credit card replacement and property loss from their now-useless computers.

The 10 retailers affected, now known colloquially and to their ongoing irritation as the Black Monday Ten, also filed suit.

With Va-Voom!’s uninsured losses building from the millions to the tens of millions, Paul Vitez, once a magazine cover boy, resigned his position.

Poll Question

How much thought have you given to the third-party liability consequences of a cyber-attack on your system or on the systems of one of your business partners?

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Risk & Insurance® partnered with XL Group to produce this scenario. Below are XL Group’s recommendations on how to prevent the losses presented in the scenario. These “Lessons Learned” are not the editorial opinion of Risk & Insurance®.

1. Have a crisis management response plan in place – The consequences of a cyber-attack are too expensive and too damaging for companies not to have a clear idea how they are going to respond in the event their services, or the services of their business partners are interrupted.

2. Understand your risk profile – Different companies have different cyber-risk profiles depending on their industry. Understanding your cyber-risk profile and working in conjunction with an agent and underwriter to map out the best coverage is a crucial step in avoiding being underinsured or paying too much for coverage you don’t need.

3. You are next – The realm of cyber-security and cyber-attacks is one area where an “it can’t happen here” mentality could be catastrophic. The chilling fact of the matter is that the most well-financed companies with the most sophisticated cyber defenses are vulnerable.

4. Get help – Whether it be through your insurance coverage or some other funding mechanism, find and connect with the consultants you need to help you understand the threat and how you can protect yourself. This risk environment is changing day by day and no one can afford to be content with the status quo.

5. Enforce your IT policies – Having sensible IT policies in place to minimize the potential for an attack is not enough. Companies must be proactive in seeing that employees take seriously company rules and standards on data encryption, and the use of personal devices in the workplace or in connection with company networks.

Additional Partner Resources

XL Group Cyber Product Sheet

John Coletti, Underwriting Manager of Cyber Liability, discusses cyber coverage options.




Dan Reynolds is editor-in-chief of Risk & Insurance. He can be reached at dreynolds@lrp.com.
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Risk Scenario

The Best Intentions

Construction executives let their emotions get the best of them after an onsite death, with dire policy consequences.
By: | November 3, 2014 • 7 min read
Risk Scenarios are created by Risk & Insurance editors along with leading industry partners. The hypothetical, yet realistic stories, showcase emerging risks that can result in significant losses if not properly addressed.

Disclaimer: The events depicted in this scenario are fictitious. Any similarity to any corporation or person, living or dead, is merely coincidental.

Water Everywhere

Workers with the O’Hanlon Construction Company are used to seeing the white pickup truck with the green municipal seal driven by Yakima County code inspector Ty Davis on the job site. Davis is a 25-year veteran of the position. So when Davis drives up to the site of a municipal tunneling project being run by O’Hanlon, no one is particularly surprised or concerned.

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Affable, fit and seemingly inseparable from his mobile device and a Styrofoam cup of coffee with cream and sugar, Davis made his way from the pickup truck, waving a friendly hello to the foreman on the job, Hector Lopes.

“Hector my man, how are we today?” said Davis, walking up to the where Lopes was overseeing a crew of three that was building the forms to lay an asphalt hiking and biking path on the floor of the tunnel.

“I’d be a lot better if those Seahawks would play some run defense,” said Lopes, pausing from his work to shake Davis’ hand.

“Ahh, they’ll get it together, it’s early yet,” Davis said.

Davis nods to the crew doing the concrete work in the tunnel.

“How’s it goin’ down there?” he asked.

“Oh, it’s goin’,” said Lopes. “The rain ain’t helpin’, but we’re trying to get it done on time.”

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Partner

“You mind if I go down and have a look?” said Davis.

“Sure thing,” said Lopes. “It’s break time, anyway.”

“Hey guys!” Lopes called to the crew. “Break. Ty’s comin’ down for a look, too.”

The crew complied, following Lopes up to the food trucks across the street.

Davis walked carefully down the existing bike path to the tunnel floor. Lopes no sooner got to the other side of the street when a horrendous noise shattered the calm of the morning. Lopes sprinted back to the site and couldn’t believe what he saw when he looked down to the tunnel.

“Ty!” Lopes screamed.

A portion of the tunnel wall had given way, burying Ty Davis under two tons of concrete, mud and water.

***

John O’Hanlon, the son of the company founder and a close friend of Ty Davis, was overwhelmed by Davis’ death. Even though the culpability for a faulty soil analysis could lie with many parties, O’Hanlon felt he must formally communicate his grief and his commitment to do the right thing by sending an e-mail to county officials.

“We will do everything in our power to see that Ty Davis’ family is provided for,” the e-mail read, in part.

“Words cannot express my shame and horror that mistakes our company made played a part in the death of my beloved friend,” the distraught e-mail concluded.

The same evening the e-mail is received, the head of the Yakima County Board of County Commissioners was interviewed on television saying that executives with long-time county contractor O’Hanlon Construction Company were devastated at their “failure” and had vowed to do what they could to make things right.

Poll Question

Do you and your colleagues have a clear understanding with your broker on your obligations to report any possible claims in a timely manner as defined in your policies?

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Excuse Me?

Sharon Holmes, the retail broker with whom O’Hanlon placed their professional liability coverage, was working on a renewal when something she saw in her e-mail inbox caused her to stop. It was a construction risk newsletter that contained news of the latest legal findings, settlements and other developments in the construction risk management world.

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“What?” Holmes said as she clicked on the e-mail, her attention having been caught by the word “O’Hanlon” in the subject line.

“Contractor admits fault in death of county employee …” Holmes said, reading aloud.

“They can’t be serious,” she said out loud, reaching for her phone and hastily dialing a number.

“John, it’s Sharon Holmes,” Holmes said.

“I’m sorry … who?” John O’Hanlon said.

“Sharon Holmes, I’m your professional and general liability insurance broker,” Holmes said after a pause.

“Oh … yeah … what can I do for you, Sharon?” O’Hanlon said.




“What you can do for me …” Holmes began, and then stopped herself from saying something she might regret.

“Ummm …” she said, collecting her thoughts.

“John, I’m looking at an industry newsletter in my inbox that refers to you making a statement to public officials that seems to take responsibility for the death of a code inspector at one of your job sites.”

“Huh? Well, yeah. I had to say something, Ty was my friend. We’ve been working with Yakima County for more than 20 years,” O’Hanlon said.

“John, that may be true, but I wish you had consulted with me before you made any statements,” Holmes said.

“The truth is the truth, he died in our tunnel,” O’Hanlon said.

Holmes again composed herself, seeking the right delivery.

“John. I’m sorry you lost a friend. I’d be upset too if I lost a friend. But I need to meet with you and Billy [O’Hanlon, John’s brother and the company CEO] on this. We need to go over the insurance coverage implications as soon as possible.”

“Well, Ty’s funeral is today, so today is out,” O’Hanlon said.

“Tomorrow then, can you do it tomorrow?” Holmes asked.

“Sure … tomorrow,” O’Hanlon said weakly.

Holmes hung up with O’Hanlon and immediately dialed the Seattle offices of a major national construction risk carrier.

“Hey, Brian, it’s Sharon Holmes.”

“Hey Sharon, I had a feeling I’d be hearing from you this morning,” said Brian Snyder, the regional claims executive for the carrier.

“So you saw it,” said Holmes.

“Yep. Just hit my inbox this morning. I can check the policy … as can you … but I’m pretty sure what it’s going to say,” Snyder said.

“We go four days without being notified of a job site death, I’m pretty sure coverage will be denied,” Snyder said.

“I’ll check the policy,” Holmes said weakly.

“Suit yourself. Sorry about this,” Snyder said in conclusion.

Poll Question

Are you aware that documented admission of culpability, although you may feel it is the “right thing to do” could severely impair your chances of recovery under your professional liability policies?

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A Direct Hit

Ty Davis’ widow and children filed a lawsuit against O’Hanlon Construction, Yakima County and three subcontractors alleging that their failure to conduct competent soil testing resulted in the inspector’s death.

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An investigation commissioned by the Davis family concluded that the soil study ordered by O’Hanlon on behalf of the county failed to take into account possible shifts in the water content of the project soil due to variations in rainfall and the municipal water table.

Upon notice of the lawsuit, O’Hanlon’s carrier told the company that it had no plans to provide for the company’s defense. A recorded, broadcast admission of guilt and a failure to notify the broker or the carrier in a timely manner effectively voided the company’s professional liability coverage, said the carriers’ attorneys, in a letter to Sharon Holmes and the O’Hanlons.

“We should sue them! How were we supposed to know?” Billy O’Hanlon said to his brother John, after the grief of Ty Davis’ death faded and they started taking a more pragmatic assessment of their situation.

“Besides, being transparent in our dealings with the county has been a hallmark or our relationship. There’s no value in that?” Billy thundered.

At his older brother Billy’s urging, John O’Hanlon called Sharon Holmes and broached the topic of O’Hanlon disputing the carrier’s refusal to pay for a legal defense.

“I don’t see how you could win, and I think you’d be throwing good money after bad,” Holmes said.

“I strongly advise against it. I’m not trying to be harsh, John, but you should not have said what you said without A, talking to me or B, talking to an attorney,” Holmes said.

O’Hanlon’s attorneys mount a game defense, pointing to the contractor’s long, and nearly blemish-free service record with the county and good documentation of transparency being a hallmark of the company’s business dealings.

All to no avail.

A jury found O’Hanlon, the three subcontractors, and the county liable for the death of Ty Davis to the tune of $8 million in loss of income, pain and suffering.

O’Hanlon, which thought it was doing the right thing by apologizing, and was the only entity to apologize, is the only defendant uncovered by insurance.

O’Hanlon is out of pocket to the tune of $4 million, not including court costs.

Poll Question

Are you aligned with vendors, suppliers, and subcontractors on the critical procedures of how potential claims or circumstances that could lead to litigation should be responded to and communicated?

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Risk & Insurance® partnered with XL Group to produce this scenario. Below are XL Group’s recommendations on how to prevent the losses presented in the scenario. These “Lessons Learned” are not the editorial opinion of Risk & Insurance®.

1. Contact your broker first: At the first sign of trouble on any project, promptly contact your broker to report the circumstance. Late, or non-reporting of an incident, large or small, can result in your Professional Liability coverage being denied.

2. Be mindful of your actions post-incident: Understand that taking actions to explain, admit fault, mediate, finger point, or recommend fixes or alternatives to a circumstance prior to notifying your broker may also result in your coverage being denied.

3. Have a communication plan: Create a circumstance reporting protocol within your organization to be followed by all employees, including designating a “quarterback” to coordinate external communications.

4. Align your philosophy with your coverage: Ensure your own best practices are not in conflict with the terms of your insurance coverage.




Dan Reynolds is editor-in-chief of Risk & Insurance. He can be reached at dreynolds@lrp.com.
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Sponsored: Aspen Insurance

A Modern Claims Philosophy: Proactive and Integrated

Aspen Insurance views the expertise and data of their claims professionals as a valuable asset.
By: | February 19, 2015 • 4 min read
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According to some experts, “The best claim is the one that never happens.”

But is that even remotely realistic?

Experienced risk professionals know that in the real world, claims and losses are inevitable. After all, it’s called Risk Management, not Risk Avoidance.

And while no one likes losses, there are rich lessons to be gleaned from the claims management process. Through careful tracking and analysis of losses, risk professionals spot gaps in their risk control programs and identify new or emerging risks.

Aspen Insurance embraces this philosophy by viewing the data and expertise of their claims operation as a valuable asset. Unlike more traditional carriers, Aspen Insurance integrates their claims professionals into all of their client work – from the initial risk assessment and underwriting process through ongoing risk management consulting and loss control.

This proactive and integrated approach results in meaningful reductions to the frequency and severity of client losses. But when the inevitable does happen, Aspen Insurance claims professionals utilize their established understanding of client risks and operations to produce some truly amazing solutions.

“I worked at several of the most well known and respected insurance companies in my many years as a claims executive. But few of them utilize an approach that is as innovative as Aspen Insurance,” said Stephen Perrella, senior vice president, casualty claims, at Aspen Insurance.

SponsoredContent_Aspen“We do a lot of trending and data analysis to provide as much information as possible to our clients. Our analytics can help clients improve upon their own risk management procedures.”
— Stephen Perrella, Senior Vice President, Casualty Claims, Aspen Insurance

Utilizing claims expertise to improve underwriting

Acting as adviser and advocate, Aspen integrates the entire process under a coverage coordinator who ensures that the underwriters, claims and insureds agree on consistent, clear definitions and protocols. With claims professionals involved in the initial account review and the development of form language, Aspen’s underwriters have a full sense of risks so they can provide more specific and meaningful coverage, and identify risks and exclusions that the underwriter might not consider during a routine underwriting process.

“Most insurers don’t ever want to talk about claims and underwriting in the same sentence,” said Perrella. “That archaic view can potentially hurt the insurance company as well as their business partners.”
SponsoredContent_AspenSponsoredContent_AspenAspen Insurance considered a company working on a large bridge refurbishment project on the West Coast as a potential insured, posing the array of generally anticipated construction-related risks. During underwriting, its claims managers discovered there was a large oil storage facility underneath the bridge. If a worker didn’t properly tether his or her tools, or a piece of steel fell onto a tank and fractured it, the consequences would be severe. Shutting down a widely used waterway channel for an oil cleanup would be devastating. The business interruption claims alone would be astronomical.

“We narrowed the opportunity for possible claims that the underwriter was unaware existed at the outset,” said Perrella.

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Risk management improved

Claims professionals help Aspen Insurance’s clients with their risk management programs. When data analysis reveals high numbers of claims in a particular area, Aspen readily shares that information with the client. The Aspen team then works with the client to determine if there are better ways to handle certain processes.

“We do a lot of trending and data analysis to provide as much information as possible to our clients,” said Perrella. “Our analytics can help clients improve upon their own risk management procedures.”
SponsoredContent_Aspen
SponsoredContent_AspenFor a large restaurant-and-entertainment group with locations in New York and Las Vegas, Aspen’s consultative approach has been critical. After meeting with risk managers and using analytics to study trends in the client’s portfolio, Aspen learned that the sheer size and volume of customers at each location led to disparate profiles of patron injuries.

Specifically, the organization had a high number of glass-related incidents across its multiple venues. So Aspen’s claims and underwriting professionals helped the organization implement new reporting protocols and risk-prevention strategies that led to a significant drop in glass-related claims over the following two years. Where one location would experience a disproportionate level of security assault or slip & fall claims, the possible genesis for those claims was discussed with the insured and corrective steps explored in response. Aspen’s proactive management of the account and working relationship with its principals led the organization to make changes that not only lowered the company’s exposures, but also kept patrons safer.

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World-class claims management

Despite expert planning and careful prevention, losses and claims are inevitable. With Aspen’s claims department involved from the earliest stages of risk assessment, the department has developed world-class claims-processing capability.

“When a claim does arrive, everyone knows exactly how to operate,” said Perrella. “By understanding the perspectives of both the underwriters and the actuaries, our claims folks have grown to be better business people.

“We have dramatically reduced the potential for any problematic communication breakdown between our claims team, broker and the client,” said Perrella.
SponsoredContent_AspenSponsoredContent_AspenA fire ripped through an office building rendering it unusable by its seven tenants. An investigation revealed that an employee of the client intentionally set the fire. The client had not purchased business interruption insurance, and instead only had coverage for the physical damage to the building.

The Aspen claims team researched a way to assist the client in filing a third-party claim through secondary insurance that covered the business interruption portion of the loss. The attention, knowledge and creativity of the claims team saved the client from possible insurmountable losses.

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Modernize your carrier relationship

Aspen Insurance’s claims philosophy is a great example of how this carrier’s innovative perspective is redefining the underwriter-client relationship. Learn more about how Aspen Insurance can benefit your risk management program at http://www.aspen.co/insurance/.

Stephen Perrella, Senior Vice President, Casualty, can be reached at Stephen.perrella@aspen-insurance.com.

This article is provided for news and information purposes only and does not necessarily represent Aspen’s views and does constitute legal advice. This article reflects the opinion of the author at the time it was written taking into account market, regulatory and other conditions at the time of writing which may change over time. Aspen does not undertake a duty to update the article.

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This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with Aspen Insurance. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.




Aspen Insurance is a business segment of Aspen Insurance Holdings Limited. It provides insurance for property, casualty, marine, energy and transportation, financial and professional lines, and programs business.
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