P3 Model in Action

Speed and Savings

A $1 billion bridge rebuild is boosted by new surety claims and liquidity elements. 
By: | November 2, 2015 • 7 min read
Nebraska Bridges

The dilemma of limited public sector budgets and crumbling infrastructure may have found a cure. The state of Pennsylvania took advantage of recent developments by surety bond underwriters to help secure an aggressive program to replace bridges around the state.


Surety bonds are required for work done by government entities, but this is a public-private partnership, so letters of credit were an option. But the sponsor, the state Department of Transportation (PennDOT), decided to use a surety bond program using new elements that included a fixed claims-determination process, and also liquidity provisions to ensure that work could continue during a claim.

The Rapid Bridge Replacement Project (RBR) is addressing 558 structurally deficient bridges across the commonwealth under a design-build-finance-maintain public-private partnership (P3) arrangement between PennDOT and Plenary Walsh Keystone Partners — the joint venture concessionaire, owned 80 percent by Plenary Group USA and 20 percent by Walsh Investors.

“This feature, which is more seen with contractor performance bonds in Europe, reduces the period of uncertainty in relation to a claim from a surety and for that reason it is assessed in a positive way from rating agencies and lenders.” — Michael R. Bonini, director, Public-Private Transportation Partnership Office, PennDOT.

Plenary Walsh is responsible for demolishing the existing bridges, maintaining traffic during construction, and then maintaining the new bridges for 25 years following construction. PennDOT will retain ownership of the bridges throughout.

It is the largest road project in Pennsylvania history.

Most of the bridges included in the program range from 40 to 75 feet in length and are located in rural regions on the state highway system.


The RBR is the first project to be completed under Pennsylvania’s 2012 P3-enabling legislation.

PennDOT said it chose the P3 structure to accelerate the replacement of the bridges and facilitate efficiencies in design and the construction of bridge components. This has resulted in a 20 percent cost savings over the life of the concession period, compared to PennDOT’s replacing the bridges itself, according to the agency.

Substantial completion of the project is expected on Dec. 31, 2017. Total cost is $1.119 billion; the design-build contract is for $899 million.

PennDOT said the batching of the projects will allow the bridges to be replaced and maintained at an average cost of $1.6 million each versus $2 million each if completed by PennDOT.

Commercial close occurred on Jan. 9, financial was March 18. Construction on the first bridges began this summer, and the bridges will be completed in batches. Substantial completion of the project is expected on Dec. 31, 2017. Total cost is $1.119 billion; the design-build contract is for $899 million.

“The key feature of the performance bond used for the Rapid Bridge Replacement project that is different from more traditional ones is that it spells out a specific process about accepting claims, dispute resolution and how long such a process can take,” said Michael R. Bonini, director of the Public-Private Transportation Partnership Office at PennDOT.

“This feature, which is more seen with contractor performance bonds in Europe, reduces the period of uncertainty in relation to a claim from a surety and for that reason it is assessed in a positive way from rating agencies and lenders.

“For PennDOT, this means a more streamlined process in relation to timely completion of the project and access to this mechanism if the contract is terminated and the design-build contract is assigned to PennDOT.”

New Delivery Method

Surety bonding is “in a state of rapid development,” said Michael Bond, head of surety for Zurich, which was a participating surety in the RBR. “This is a new delivery method in the U.S.


“The enabling legislation for P3 programs does not necessarily specify surety as opposed to letters of credit or other forms of performance security. Letters of credit have been used worldwide to provide liquidity to a project, but they don’t protect subcontractors.

“Performance bonds also cover payments for labor and materials. That ensures workers and suppliers are covered.”

“The Pennsylvania program is a very creative example of how the public works and surety industries are responding to current needs.” Michael Bond, head of surety,  Zurich

Bond said that the innovations in the RBR program address some of the prevailing concerns about surety, namely the uncertainty of the claims process, and the possibility of untimely payments, that could cause a liquidity problem for the project.

“The Pennsylvania program is a very creative example of how the public works and surety industries are responding to current needs,” said Bond.

To be clear, the surety bonds are different from the public-works bonds or funding bonds that are issued by the state authority and actually pay for the project.

The surety bonds provide performance security that the concessionaire, Plenary Walsh in this case, will complete the project satisfactorily. If there is a default, there would be a call on the bond and the surety would step in to work with the authority and the contractors to complete the project.

“What is new and different is that in a traditional public-works project the government is the owner and counterparty to the contractor,” said Bond. “In the P3 model, the counterparty is a private entity created to execute the project.”

Doug Wheeler, regional managing director for construction services, Aon Infrastructure Solutions

Doug Wheeler, regional managing director for construction services, Aon Infrastructure Solutions

He added that while such a special-purpose entity has some advantages over traditional public-works operations, it also has some proscriptions. Notably, the project is funded on a limited-recourse basis, so if there are cost escalations or unforeseen expenses, the concessionaire cannot dip into the government pockets to cover. There is some contingency, but it is limited.

“This is the next level in construction [risk management],” said Doug Wheeler, regional managing director for construction services at Aon Infrastructure Solutions. Aon was the broker for the contractor.

A European Model

“This alternative project delivery model came out of Europe and into Canada, then into the U.S. There is more legwork up-front, but there are dozens of projects already on board. Pennsylvania is a big proponent, New Jersey is almost there [with enabling legislation], but Governor Christie vetoed the most recent proposal. In New York, there has been a push.”

This is a very exciting time in public works and surety, said Aon’s Grace Drinker, senior analyst of infrastructure.

She stressed that even though the P3 process is different than the traditional design-bid-build approach, “there are still checks and balances aplenty in P3. There have been P3 contracts cancelled because of oversight and scrutiny.

Grace Drinker, senior analyst of infrastructure, Aon

Grace Drinker, senior analyst of infrastructure, Aon

“There is no risk to public safety or the public purse in the P3 process,” Drinker said. “What it does is bring operating efficiency to infrastructure.”

With the P3 approach, she said, “it is possible to have a higher initial cost, but the operating efficiency over the 30-year lifecycle of a project is a net savings. There is a real value for money in this.”

Drinker added that “contractors prefer to use surety capacity to letters of credit capacity to meet lender requirements on projects.”

Wheeler concurred that contractor preference is a big piece of the puzzle. “Surety is more efficient for the construction industry.” He added that capacity in surety is finite, but not a concern.

“Bundling the bridges allows them to be replaced faster and cheaper,” said Steve T. Park, senior associate with Ballard Spahr in Philadelphia, the bond counsel to PennDOT.

Lynn Schubert, president, Surety & Fidelity Association of America

Lynn Schubert, president, Surety & Fidelity Association of America

“The typical design-bid-build process would have taken longer. They selected bridges that could be easily bundled, designs that were similar, so they could fix the most in one program.”

There was equal diligence on the other side of the table.

“We spent a lot of time de-risking the program,” said Sarah Roberts, president of Intech Risk Management, insurance advisers to the concessionaire.

“We spent a lot of time de-risking the program.” — Sarah Roberts, president, Intech Risk Management

“When people hear 558 bridges, the initial perception is that they were not certain it could succeed. But the project is actually easier to manage with a lot of bridges than it would be for a single project of the same size.

“With a single project, if there is a delay, the whole timeline is thrown off. With so many bridges, it is possible to swap out one for another and work around delays to keep the whole project on schedule.”

She is sanguine about the growth potential for P3 projects in the U.S., at least in the long term.


“I don’t think we are there yet in P3 in the U.S.; there is still a lot of coming of age to do. In this case, the P3 model had a direct benefit to the owner, PennDOT, and indirectly to the taxpayers of the state.”

Lynn Schubert, president of the Surety & Fidelity Association of America, confirmed that P3s, and most public construction in Europe are protected by letters of credit.

“In the U.S., our public construction prefers performance bonds for completion and payment. But the concern of the ratings agencies is the speed with which surety bonds are called upon.

“In the Pennsylvania [project], the contracts include a quick-resolution process. It is a little extra piece, but it is very exciting.”

Gregory DL Morris is an independent business journalist based in New York with 25 years’ experience in industry, energy, finance and transportation. He can be reached at [email protected]
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Risk Retention Groups

Time for Property

Potential legislation in Congress would allow risk retention groups to write property. Here are the arguments for and against.
By: | August 3, 2015 • 7 min read
R8-15p40-41 06RRG.indd

Is it an insurance issue or a nonprofit issue? Is there an insurance market for these risks or is government intervention needed? Is Congress looking to tell the insurance industry what’s what or are lawmakers looking to facilitate a market-based solution?

The bigger question is: Whom do you trust?


At the heart of these questions is an insurance law: the Liability Risk Retention Act (LRRA). Having passed it in 1981 in response to a collapse of the product liability insurance market, Congress last amended the law in 1986 to include most commercial liability.

Since then, a vibrant subculture within the self-insurance world has grown up. In 2014, the average annual premium written by risk retention groups (RRGs) was $12.6 million. With 234 RRGs now in existence, according to the Risk Retention Reporter, that amounts to nearly $3 billion in total premium.

Despite such a success story, surprisingly, RRGs haven’t expanded further — say, to property coverages. It’s not for want of trying.

Janice Abraham, CEO of one of the biggest RRGs, United Educators, has been in her position for 18 years.

“I don’t believe the government should be in the business of insurance at all.” — U.S. Rep. Dennis A Ross, a Florida Republican

“I have been working on this for almost the whole time,” she said, referring to the fight for RRGs to retain property risk.

Right there with her has been Pamela Davis, CEO of another massive RRG provider, the Alliance of Nonprofits for Insurance (ANI). They spearhead a renewed effort to expand the LRRA to allow RRGs to underwrite property coverage.
The fight is being led in Congress by Florida Republican Rep. Dennis A. Ross, who assures constituents and insurance professionals that he’s a “strong free market person.”

“I don’t believe the government should be in the business of insurance at all,” he said. Efforts to expand the LRRA is not “the camel’s nose under the tent trying to get into the industry.”

Instead, Ross, whose brother Bill served as CFO of the Hillsboro County Boys & Girls Club, said that he appreciates the challenges nonprofits face, and hopes to create an opportunity for such groups to pool resources and focus on their primary missions, not premiums.

The pro-LRRA expansion argument is best illustrated by a plausible example: A nonprofit senior center can purchase $1 million in liability through an RRG to cover the liability to transport its seniors in a van, but that RRG cannot underwrite damage to the $20,000 van itself.

Janice Abraham CEO United Educators

Janice Abraham
United Educators

Or take the example of a college that buses its sports teams to various competitions and shuttles its students around campus. An RRG could offer the school millions in third-party liability, but not the thousands to fix the bus after a fender-bender.

That just doesn’t make sense, advocates said. Of course, their opponents tell a different story.

One Side

A primary argument for the new LRRA is that it won’t be a big change at all. The draft bill now in Congress would only allow certain groups to write coverages like property, fleet auto physical damage and business interruption: RRGs active for 10 consecutive years, with at least $10 million in capital and surplus.

Perhaps most limiting, the bill only applies to RRGs protecting 501(c)(3) organizations.

The argument: The commercial insurance market has failed these nonprofits. These community and educational nonprofits tend to be small in size and faced with unique risk.

“These are hard to cover property, auto physical damage issues that really warrant a lot of attention and a lot of risk management,” said Abraham.

Sometimes, commercial insurers are interested in these risks, Abraham said. Sometimes, they are not.

What often happens: A 501(c)(3) purchases liability insurance through an RRG, then finds it challenging to buy unbundled property from a commercial carrier. What’s more, seeking out unbundled property coverage adds operational costs to small organizations on constrained budgets.

According to Davis, 85 percent of 501(c)(3)s that would benefit from the law change have annual budgets of less than $1 million.

In United Educators’ case, schools come to the RRG year after year looking for help with this issue, Abraham said.

She went on the record — the Congressional Record — about that unmet demand when she testified to the Subcommittee of Housing and Insurance of the Financial Services Committee of the U.S. House of Representatives on May 20, 2014.


Davis said she hears from insurance brokers about these problems and the unmet demand. They tell her that only 6 percent of commercial markets would consider standalone property risks from nonprofits.

“I would love to see the market come up to [nonprofits] and say, ‘There is no need for this,’ ” Ross said, but unfortunately “games” are being played in the commercial market.

But the main takeaway from proponents is: A vote for the LRRA change is a vote that benefits communities and their nonprofits. It’s not about commercial insurance. So how can people dare oppose it?

The Other Side

Opposition is aligned against the LRRA expansion, just as it has been for the past 18 years that Abraham fought for it.

On one side of the opposition is the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC).

“These are hard to cover property, auto physical damage issues that really warrant a lot of attention and a lot of risk management.” — Janice Abraham, CEO, United Educators

The insurance regulators have never been fond of risk retention groups, as one insider in the captive insurance industry put it, perhaps in large part because the 1981 law and its 1986 addendum are two of only a few instances when the feds have intervened in state-based regulation.

In the last serious effort to reform the LRRA, a two-year attempt that ran aground in 2013, opposition from the NAIC was cited as one major reason the bill didn’t pass.

News reports at the time focused on the NAIC’s belief that RRGs are more prone to insolvency than commercial carriers.

For their part, commercial carriers might argue that RRGs aren’t on an even playing field. Once formed, RRGs are regulated only by the insurance department in the state in which they are domiciled (not in every state they write business).

Another argument might be that they aren’t as safe for consumers. RRGs are not subject to state guarantee funds in the event they go belly up.

Beyond these two distinctions and the fact that they can only write liability, RRGs are also a unique form of captive because only owners can contribute capital, only policyholders can be owners.

Independent insurance agents, represented by the Independent Insurance Agents & Brokers of America (Big I), also oppose expanding LRRA.

Jen McPhillips, its senior director of federal government affairs, said concerns include consumer protection and the fact that RRGs have no experience writing property, but the primary objection is the failure to demonstrate a market using empirical data.

“The traditional marketplace is there and is willing to take on the risk,” she said.

Whereas the original LRRA was passed in response to a clear crisis in coverage, no such crisis exists today.

Independent insurance agents, represented by the Independent Insurance Agents & Brokers of America (Big I), oppose expanding LRRA.

However, data does support the contention that RRGs serve their policyholders well.

In A.M. Best’s “2015 Captive Review,” the rating agency found that risk retention groups outperformed commercial counterparts in loss adjustment expense, underwriting expense and combined ratio, among others. They did not outperform them in policyholder dividends.

The review’s authors were also quick to mention the other benefit of the RRG structure — dividends and surplus buildup are returned to policyholders. Between 2009 and 2013, that amounted to $638 million for rated RRGs.

Also, RRGs are known to provide members with tailored risk management and loss-control services.

“Because RRGs serve a single industry, they are able to develop and share best practices including risk management initiatives, which isn’t common among commercial carriers,” wrote Christina Kindstedt, senior vice president of Willis’ Global Captive Practice for the Americas, in a blog calling for the LRRA expansion passage.

To insurers that voice concerns about RRGs not “playing on a level playing field,” David Provost, deputy commissioner for Vermont’s Captive Insurance Division, said: “Most RRGs are playing on a field that you abandoned.”

Vermont, it should be noted, is the No. 1 home for RRGs in the world; one-third of all groups are domiciled in Vermont, and they bring in two-thirds of all RRG-related premiums.

The Chances of Passage

Beyond the insurance industry lobbying against the bill in Washington, D.C., another hindrance is the overall inertia in the Capitol.


“Ask Congress,” said Abraham when asked why an LRRA expansion hasn’t passed. It “would be foolish to be overly optimistic” about the bill’s passage this year, she said.

As of early July, Ross had not yet presented the bill to the Subcommittee on Housing and Insurance, waiting on industry groups to provide market information.

Davis is optimistic and determined. Even if it doesn’t pass this year, she is “absolutely determined to get this through.”

“It certainly would help our schools and it would certainly help our small nonprofits in our communities,” she said.

Matthew Brodsky is editor of Wharton Magazine. He can be reached at [email protected]
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Sponsored: Aspen Insurance

When the Going Gets Rough, the Smart Come to Aspen Insurance

Aspen’s products liability team excels at solving tough problems and building long-term relationships.
By: | November 2, 2015 • 5 min read

Sometimes, renewals don’t go as expected.

Perhaps your company experienced a particularly costly claim last year. Or maybe it was just one too many smaller incidents that added to a long claims history.

No matter the cause, few words are scarier to hear this time of year than, “Renewal denied.”

But new options are now emerging for companies that are willing to tackle their product liability challenges head-on.

Aspen Insurance’s products liability team – underwriters, loss control engineers and claims professionals – welcome clients who have been denied coverage from other, more traditional carriers.

“For our team, we view our best opportunities to be with clients who have specific problems to solve. In these cases, we leverage our deep expertise and integrated team approach to help the client identify root causes and fix issues,” said Roxanne Mitchell, Aspen U.S. Insurance’s executive vice president and chief casualty officer.

“The result is a much improved product or manufacturing process and the start of a new business relationship that we can grow for many years to come.”

“We want to work with insureds as partners, long after a problem has been resolved. We seek clients who are going to stick with us, just as we will with them. As the insured’s experience improves over time, pricing will improve with it.”
— Roxanne Mitchell, Executive Vice President, Chief Casualty Officer, Aspen Insurance

Of course, this specialized approach is not applicable to all situations and clients. Aspen Insurance only offers coverage if the team is confident the problems can be solved and that the client genuinely wants to engage in improving their business and moving forward.

“Our robust and detailed problem-solving approach quickly identifies pressing issues. Once we know what it will take to rectify the problem, it’s up to the client to make the investments and take the necessary actions,” added Mitchell. “As a specialty carrier operating within the E&S market, we have the ability to develop custom-tailored solutions to unique and complex problems.”

For clients who are eager to learn from managing through a unique, pressing issue, and apply the consequential lessons to improve, Aspen Insurance can be their best, and sometimes only, insurance friend.

The Strategy: Collaboration from Underwriting, Claims and Loss Control

Aspen offers a proven combination of experienced underwriting professionals collaborating with the company’s outstanding loss control/risk engineering and seasoned claims experts.

“We deliver experts who understand the industries in which they work, which is another critical differentiator for us,” Mitchell said.

Mitchell described the Aspen underwriting process as a team approach. In diagnosing the causes of a specific problem, the Aspen team thoroughly vets the client’s claims history, talks to the broker about the exposures and circumstances, peruses user manuals and manufacturing processes, evaluates the supply chain structure – whatever needs to be done to get to the root of a problem.

“Aspen pulls from every resource we have in our arsenal,” she said.

After the Aspen team explores the underlying reason(s) and root cause(s) producing the client’s problem in the first place, it will offer a solution along with corresponding price and coverage specifics.

“We have a very specific business appetite and approach,” Mitchell said. “We don’t treat products liability as a commodity.”

As noted, a major component of Aspen’s approach is that they seek to work with clients who are equally interested in solving their problems and put in the work required to reach that end.

Aspen_SponsoredContentMitchell cited two recent client examples of manufacturers of expensive products that could endure large claim losses but had some serious problems that needed to be solved.

A conveyor systems manufacturer had a few unexpected large claims and lost its coverage in the traditional insurance market. The manufacturer never managed a product recall in the past, and Aspen’s loss control engineers dug into why several systems failed. Aspen also helped the company alert customers about the impending repairs.

Another company that manufactured firetrucks had three or four large losses, when telescoping ladders collapsed, resulting in serious injuries. The company’s claim history was clean until this particular product defect. When Aspen researched the issue, it found that the specific metal and welding used to make the telescoping ladders didn’t have the required torque to keep the ladders from collapsing.

Both companies worked with Aspen to correct the issues. Problem solved.

“It is so important that our clients are willing to actively engage in finding out what is causing their losses so they can learn from the experience,” Mitchell said.

Apart from the company’s problem-solving philosophy, Mitchell said, the willingness to allow qualified clients to manage their own claims is the second biggest reason companies come to Aspen.

“We are willing to work with clients who have demonstrated the expertise to handle their own claims — with our monitoring — rather than hiring a TPA,” she said. “It is a useful option that can save them money.”

Mitchell explained that customers who stay with Aspen for the long-term can be confident that Aspen will help them – whatever the challenge. For instance, if they need a coverage modification for a new product that they bring to market, Aspen can help make it happen. Mitchell noted, “We pride ourselves on the ability to develop custom-tailored solutions to address the complex and challenging risks that our clients face.”

Long-term Relationships

Aspen_SponsoredContentAspen’s desire to help solve difficult client problems comes with a caveat, but one that benefits both Aspen and the insured: It wants to move forward as a true partner – one with clear long-term relationship potential.

In a nutshell, Aspen’s products liability worldview is to partner with a manufacturer who is facing a difficult situation with claims or coverage, help them solve that problem, and then, engage in a long-term, committed relationship with the client.

“We want to work with insureds as partners, long after a problem has been resolved,” she said. “We seek clients who are going to stick with us, just as we will with them. As the insured’s experience improves over time, pricing will improve with it. This partnership approach can be a clear win-win.”

This article is provided for news and information purposes only and does not necessarily represent Aspen’s views and does constitute legal advice. This article reflects the opinion of the author at the time it was written taking into account market, regulatory and other conditions at the time of writing which may change over time. Aspen does not undertake a duty to update the article.


This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with Aspen Insurance. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.

Aspen Insurance is a business segment of Aspen Insurance Holdings Limited.
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