Crisis Management

Dealing with Civil Unrest

In the aftermath of riots, urban-based companies are strengthening contingency plans to protect their facilities, and most importantly, their employees.
By: | May 6, 2015 • 4 min read
Fire on the street

Retailers and other companies across the country are looking for a Plan B in the wake of riots that destroyed stores in Ferguson, Mo. and now Baltimore.

Meanwhile, carriers might seek to recover their losses from damage and business disruption claims by suing cities that tell their police to stand down to give space to protesters who “wished to destroy.” What’s unknown at this point is whether carriers would prevail.

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Companies need to develop contingency plans specific for each location to manage events such as riots, as well as situations that could lead to them and the resulting consequences, said Sean Ahrens, security consulting services practice leader for Aon Global Risk Consulting in Chicago.

A key part of such planning includes determining under what circumstances onsite managers or a crisis management team should close retail locations.

“Now is also the time to review contingency plans to understand what other locations can be used during a time of unrest, as well as making sure companies that supply goods to them have alternative ways to make their goods available.” — Lance Becker, vice chairman, Northeast region, Arthur J. Gallagher & Co.

“Organizations that have robust plans and contingencies may actually have shelter in place to protect employees during civil unrest,” Ahrens said.

“But if a company has no policies or procedures in place, then in the worst case scenario, they should close the store and evacuate. Ultimately, a company’s duty of care is to protect their employees from all hazards.”

Post-event, companies should also provide counseling for employees who were caught up in a riot, though a lot of them might not want to come back, he said.

Tracy Knippenburg Gillis, global reputational risk and crisis management leader for Marsh Risk Consulting in New York City, said there are a lot of factors that determine when to close a facility, such as whether it serves a critical function in the community, or whether employees would lose needed income if the store closed prematurely during peaceful protests.

“Most organizations should have their crisis management teams on alert, if not actively engaged, monitoring and potentially making decisions on delayed openings or closures over the course of events,” Gillis said.

“They should be communicating to employees what they are doing and ideally monitoring what authorities are doing, so they can make the right judgment at the right time.”

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Marsh has several clients in retail, hospitality and other entertainment-related industries that were impacted in last month’s Baltimore riots. Several suffered business disruptions due to curfews imposed by the city, said Bob O’Brien, a managing director in Marsh’s national claims practice in Washington, D.C.

“Companies should practice situational awareness,” O’Brien said.

“They have to go through several steps continuously, identifying exposures to the company and their supply chain. They should be aware of what’s going on all around them that could potentially impact them if they are caught up in a freeze zone or a closure zone.”

Companies should also review their insurance coverage to make sure they have the proper terms, limits and retention, he said. After an event, they should apply all possible triggers that could impact a claim, whether direct damage or civil authority that results in service interruption and ingress/egress issues.

Companies should make sure to secure documents to better ensure payment of their claims, he said.

Arthur J. Gallagher & Co. also had clients that suffered losses and filed claims as a result of the upheaval in Baltimore, said Lance Becker, vice chairman, Northeast region in New York City.

Becker said the recent riots that impacted area businesses serve as “an education” for companies to make sure their insurance policies cover “civil authority and unrest,” which would pay for either physical damage or losses for not being able to gain entry to the store.

“Now is also the time to review contingency plans to understand what other locations can be used during a times of unrest, as well as making sure companies that supply goods to them have alternative ways to make their good available,” he said.

Carriers might seek to recoup their losses by suing Baltimore, as several news outlets have reported that the police there were ordered to “stand down” and not prevent rioters from looting, burning or destroying stores, including a CVS pharmacy and an Ace Cash Express store.

Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake denied there was a stand down order, and she also told “Meet the Press” last Sunday that she regretted saying in an earlier press conference that space was given to protesters who “wished to destroy.”

Terrence Graves, a shareholder at Sands Anderson PC law firm in Richmond, Va., said that any city that experiences civil unrest might have sovereign immunity for those sorts of actions dealing with the police force.

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“If a city government — like any other governmental entity — takes action within what is considered its governmental sphere, such as making political decisions, as opposed to its proprietary sphere such as providing water services or maintaining city streets, then a city might have governmental immunity,” Graves said.

“There is an interesting test that most courts would run though in order to determine whether the city was acting as a government or as a landlord.”

Katie Kuehner-Hebert is a freelance writer based in California. She has more than two decades of journalism experience and expertise in financial writing. She can be reached at [email protected]
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Risk Insider: Jeff Driver

Can ‘Ebola-mania’ Give Way to a National Reset?

By: | December 10, 2014 • 2 min read
Jeff Driver is the Chief Risk Officer- Stanford University Medical Center and the Chief Executive Officer - The Risk Authority, LLC. He can be reached at [email protected]

Ebola is not a new contagion and it is one for which the United States has been preparing for since at least post-9/11 heightened bioterrorism concerns.

While some may be critical of the care provided to the first patient with Ebola in Dallas, as well as resulting communication issues involving hospital and medical officials, clearly all involved intended to do their very best under uniquely stressful conditions that rarely any American hospital had faced before.

In what will surely be a repeating pattern in the near-term, American hospitals, clinics and doctors, as well as employers and other entities will continue to periodically encounter individuals that have acquired the Ebola virus and require treatment.  The country will also have periods where there may be no known cases.

As of Nov. 11, and for the first time in 41 days since the initial U.S. patients, there were no known cases of Ebola in the U.S.  That was short-lived as within days thereafter a surgeon who had contracted the Ebola virus in West Africa was transferred to the United States for treatment, but unfortunately the patient died.

I believe we should attempt a national “reset” to manage this public health issue in America — based on science and evidence.

In order to do so, it is important to understand the causative factors leading to the arguably explicable initial national panic surrounding Ebola.  In the early moments of a risk crisis, leaders get limited chances to establish credibility and trust. The populace and media want to know the risk is understood and under control.

Early slips in Dallas failed this test, as I mention in my first article on this subject.

While some may feel on edge with regard to changing CDC guidance, in fact, the CDC is adjusting to new information and changing their guidelines appropriately; not dissimilar to how managers of risk adjust to any hazard exposure.

As managers of risk, we should be assessing the risks Ebola presents.

Ebola is really no different than other significant risks (e.g., terrorism post-9/11, Y2K, swine flu, grounding of certain airplanes).

There is a common pattern that moves from initial organic obsession to an easing, understanding, and respect of the risk that becomes balanced with other important considerations such as civil liberties, promoting international health, and maintaining world economic balance, for examples in the context of contagion risks.

For the emerging risk of Ebola in America, we are at a pivotal point to learn from the recent past and venture forward with the best of science and evidence-based risk management.

Will America press the reset?  As risk managers, we stand in an influential position within our organizations to utilize the proven methods and tools of managing enterprise risks, including contagion risk.

As such, risk managers are in a unique position to lead with others; to reset the response to the Ebola virus in our unique national microcosm and move to a balanced American view appropriately and respectfully managing our interests while simultaneously attending to world health risk issues, especially in West Africa.

Read all of Jeff Driver’s Risk Insider articles.

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Sponsored: Healthcare Solutions

Specialty Drugs Show No Signs of Slowing Down

The emergence of specialty drugs in the workers' comp market comes with a new set of complexities and a hefty price tag.
By: | August 31, 2015 • 4 min read
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A decade ago, high-cost specialty drugs were commonly referred to as “injectable drugs” and were used to treat conditions not typically covered in workers’ compensation, such as cancer, rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis.

“Today, however, new specialty drugs are emerging that will be used to treat other chronic and inflammatory conditions,” said Joe Boures, president and CEO of Healthcare Solutions, an Optum company providing specialized pharmacy benefit management services to the workers’ compensation market.

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Joe Boures, President and CEO, Healthcare Solutions

“Payers in the workers’ comp market are just beginning to feel the cost impact of greater utilization of these drugs, which come with expensive price tags.”

Specialty drugs are often manufactured using biologic rather than chemical methods, and they are no longer just administered by injections. New specialty drugs can also be inhaled or taken orally, likely contributing to the rise in their utilization.

“There isn’t a standard definition of specialty drugs, but they are generally defined as being complex to manufacture, costly, require specialty handling and distribution, and they difficult for patients to take without ongoing clinical support or may require administration by a health care provider,” said Boures.

In 2014, more than a quarter of all new therapies that the FDA approved were through its biologics division. Biologics, and similar therapies, are representative of a future trend in prescription drug spend.

“As the fastest growing costs in health care today, specialty drugs have the potential to change the way prescription benefits are provided in the future,” said Jim Andrews, executive vice president of pharmacy for Healthcare Solutions.

Workers’ Compensation payers may not recognize how specialty drugs are affecting their drug spend.

Specialty drugs like Enbrel®, Humira® and Synvisc® can be processed in conjunction with other medical procedures and, therefore, not recognized by payers as a pharmacy expense.

This leaves payers with little visibility into the costs of these medications within their book of business and a lack of tools to control these costs.

Due to the high costs of specialty medications, special due diligence should be utilized when claimants receive these medications, up to and including utilization review, said Andrews.

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Jim Andrews, Executive Vice President of Pharmacy, Healthcare Solutions

“Healthcare Solutions recommends that claimants using specialty drugs are monitored for proper medication handling and that the medication is administered appropriately, as well as monitoring the claimant to determine whether the medication is having its desired results and if there are any side effects,” he said.

“At $1,000 per pill for some of these specialty medications, making sure a claimant can tolerate the side effects becomes vital to making sure the claimant achieves the desired outcomes.”

Hepatitis C drugs have made their way to the workers’ compensation market, largely through coverage of healthcare workers, who have exposure to the disease.

“Traditional drug treatments that began in the 1990’s had a success rate of 6% and costs ranging from $1,800 to over $88,000,” said Andrews.

“The new Hepatitis C specialty medications have a treatment success rate of 94-100%, but cost between $90,000 and $226,000.”

Although the new treatments include higher drug costs, the payer’s overall medical costs may actually decrease if the Hep C patient would have required a liver transplant as part of the course of treatment without the drugs.

While the release of new Hepatitis C medications in 2014 demonstrated the potential impact specialty medications can have on workers’ compensation payers, there are some specialty medications under development that target more common conditions in workers’ compensation.

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Pfizer Inc. and Eli Lilly and Company are currently developing tanezumab, a new, non-narcotic medication to treat chronic pain, which is common in workers’ compensation claims.

Tanezumab has demonstrated benefits of reducing pain in clinical trials and may provide non-addictive pain relief to claimants in the future.  This may change how pain management is treated in the future.

Healthcare Solutions has a specialty medication program that provides payers discounted rates and management oversight of claimants receiving specialty medications.

Through the paper bill process, Healthcare Solutions aids payers in identifying specialty drugs and works with adjusters and physicians to move claimants into the specialty network.

A central feature of the program is that claimants are assigned to a clinical pharmacist or a registered nurse with specialty pharmacy training for consistent care with one-on-one consultations and ongoing case management.

The program provides patients with education and counseling, guidance on symptoms related to their medical conditions and drug side effects, proactive intervention for medication non-adherence, and prospective refill reminder and follow-up calls.

“The goal is to improve patient outcomes and reduce total costs of care,” said Boures.

This article was produced by Healthcare Solutions and not the Risk & Insurance® editorial team.



Healthcare Solutions serves as a health services company delivering integrated solutions to the property and casualty markets, specializing in workers’ compensation and auto liability/PIP.
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