On-Demand Webinar

Webinar – Healthcare Insecurity: A Global Growth Impediment

Learn how to bolster a global workforce with the right combination of benefits and insurance coverage to eliminate uncertainty about their health care options.
By: | July 21, 2016 • 2 min read

Presenters

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Overview

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Webinar Sponsor

A recent survey of business executives found that approximately 73 percent of companies surveyed deploy five percent of their workforce overseas. Companies striving to grow in today’s global economy need to have the reach and resources to position key personnel around the world. But a threatening impediment to that growth is the issue of Healthcare Insecurity.

Healthcare Insecurity is the indecision that can result when an individual falls ill while abroad and doesn’t know where to turn for treatment. Frequently, clinically unnecessary evacuation and unnecessarily expensive treatment can result, with sub-optimal patient outcomes becoming a risk.

Adding to the detrimental effects of Healthcare Insecurity is the increasing amount of political risk, not to mention terrorist activity that is compounding the stress levels of employees stationed overseas.

This one-hour webinar will delve into the topic of Healthcare Insecurity and tap expert resources to give companies guidance on, among other things:

  • How to provide on-the-ground support to globally-mobile expatriates that increase their sense of security and encourage them to utilize local health care options.
  • Developing a global program that provides employees with timely updates on issues that could impact their health and well-being, including political instability, pandemics, or terror threats.
  • Determining whether a streamlined approach to vendor services for overseas employees might be the right fit.
  • Finding the right mix of insurance coverages to both protect the company’s bottom line and provide for the health and welfare of overseas staff.

The Recording

Download a PDF slide deck of the presentation.




Dan Reynolds is editor-in-chief of Risk & Insurance. He can be reached at [email protected]
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Event Cancellation Risk

Doubts Buzz Around Rio Olympics

The threat of Zika continues to prompt calls for the cancellation of the 2016 Olympic Games.
By: | July 5, 2016 • 6 min read
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As the threat of the Zika virus remains an urgent one in Brazil, calls have been made for the cancellation or relocation of the 2016 Olympic Games – an extreme decision that would cause enormous losses to the global insurance market.

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Some of the world’s largest insurers and reinsurers, including Swiss Re and Munich Re, have exposures to the tune of hundreds of millions of dollars each for cancellation insurance policies that would likely be triggered if the games were not to take place.

Such policies cover financial losses caused by the cancellation of events and are purchased by the International Olympic Committee (IOC), which organizes the games, and by companies and organizations with significant interests in the games. They include sponsors, TV networks, tourism operators, airlines, brands with Olympic-focused marketing campaigns and others.

Underwriters must have sighed with relief when the World Health Organization said “there is no public health justification for postponing or cancelling the games.”

The risk of cancellation gained steam in recent weeks after a group of more than 150 high-profile scientists released an open letter urging the games to be suspended in order to prevent Zika from spreading around the world.

“An Unnecessary Risk”

“The Brazilian strain of Zika virus harms health in ways that science has not observed before,” the scientists said in the letter. “An unnecessary risk is posed when 500,000 foreign tourists from all countries attend the Games, potentially acquire that strain, and return home to places where it can become endemic.”

They pointed out in the document that the 2003 Women’s World Cup was moved from China to the U.S. due to the risk of SARS, which should be a precedent for the cancellation of Rio 2016.

Royal Oakes, insurance partner, Hinshaw & Culbertson

Royal Oakes, insurance partner, Hinshaw & Culbertson

Underwriters around the world must have sighed with relief when the World Health Organization released an answer to the scientists, stating that “there is no public health justification for postponing or cancelling the games.”

“It is very likely that current policies have no exclusions for public health events such as epidemics,” said Royal Oakes, an insurance partner at Hinshaw & Culbertson in Los Angeles.

The market may have dodged a bullet, but insurers and reinsurers may still face a bill due to the pesky Aedes mosquitoes, which transmit not only Zika, but also other viruses such as chikungunya, dengue and yellow fever; all common diseases in Brazil.

“Cancellation policies are such long shots that usually nobody gives them any attention,” Oakes said. “But now everybody is talking about cancelling Rio 2016 due to Zika.”

According to sources, at least one of Europe’s largest reinsurers signed a large cancellation contract with NBC, which owns TV rights to the Olympics in the U.S. It has been pressured to consider the possibility of triggering the coverage even if the games go ahead, but key American athletes decide not to compete, affecting ratings and, consequently, publicity revenues.

Although this kind of clause may not be usual in policies, Oakes said, it may have been arranged between the parties, as wordings are non-standard and are subject to agreements between buyers and underwriters. That said, he would be surprised if a policy was triggered by the fact that athletes do not show up.

Top golfers Rory McIlroy of Ireland and Jason Day of Australia, and Tejay van Garderen, one of America’s top cyclists, have already announced they are not going to Rio in August because of Zika.

Others include NBA star Pau Gasol, the most famous member of Spain’s Olympic team, U.S. soccer player Hope Solo and tennis star Serena Williams. All have expressed doubts about participating in the games due to the risk of contamination. Some NBC staffers are also passing on the opportunity.

Companies that send staff to Brazil during the games have been advised to provide information to their employees on Zika prevention.

The Brazilian government said that measures have been taken to stop the propagation of Zika during the Olympics. Furthermore, it argued that the games will take place during the Brazilian winter, when the activities of the mosquitoes diminish considerably.

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“There is no risk for the spreading of Zika to gain pace during the Olympics,” Health minister Ricardo Barros said in early June.

But the failure of the Brazilian authorities to stop the virus so far raises doubts about the minister’s claim.

Since the autochthonous version of the outbreak was first spotted in April last year, almost 92,000 cases of Zika contamination were reported in the country, according to the government.

Since October, there have been nearly 1,500 known cases of babies born with microcephaly, which has been linked to the virus. A total of 223 have already been associated to Zika via lab tests. The actual number could be much higher, as the tests to identify both Zika and microcephaly cases are not available to all Brazilians.

Companies that send staff to Brazil during the games have been advised to provide information to their employees on Zika prevention.

They range from simple measures such as applying repellent and wearing long-sleeved clothes that reduce the skin area that can be targeted by mosquitoes, to avoiding poorer regions of Rio de Janeiro, where sanitation infrastructure is precarious, and practicing safe sex, as the virus can also be transmitted during sexual intercourse.

Security Risks

But Zika is not the only risk that worries participants in the event.

Debora Rocha, regional security manager, International SOS

Debora Rocha, regional security manager, International SOS

Security is a big issue in Brazil, and 90,000 security agents will be deployed by the authorities to guarantee safety. Although terrorism is not a common threat in the country, the security forces said that they have been collecting information about potential attacks during the games and are working with other countries to neutralize the risk.

“Brazil has hosted the Pan American games, the Confederations Cup and more recently the FIFA World Cup, so there is considerable experience in dealing with large events and collaborating with security forces from other countries,” said Debora Rocha, the regional security manager at International SOS in Brazil.

But crime is a major concern in Rio de Janeiro, and it is on the rise as a consequence of Brazil’s economic crisis.

Rocha said visitors should avoid walking around beautiful Rio de Janeiro while carrying valuable items — such as iPads, smartphones or expensive watches — and they should not wander around impoverished parts of the city.

“We do not recommend that people go to ‘favela’ tours that have been fashionable in recent years,” she said, referring to Rio’s famous, and very dangerous, shantytowns.

Another important precaution is to only take taxis that are called by hotels, restaurants or telephone services. Picking a taxi on the road is a particularly bad idea as some cab drivers can be criminals in disguise.

In general, information on risk management systems and structures have not been made public, which has raised questions about the robustness of ERM at the Rio games.

“Crime is among the top two or three concerns, along with Zika and the general preparedness of infrastructure and venues in Rio,” said Abbott Matthews, an analyst at IJET International.

In the latter case, the Olympics organization has been dogged by work delays, bribery suspicions and faulty execution, as illustrated by the crumbling in April of a scenic, seaside waterway that was built as a legacy of the games to the city of Rio de Janeiro.

Preparedness has in fact been a concern throughout all of the construction of Rio’s Olympic structures, and a lack of focus on risk management may have played a role.

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The local organizers hired an experienced Brazilian risk manager to focus on enterprise risk management in 2013, but he left the next year after disagreements with his bosses. Since then, the position has not been filled.

Public speeches on risk management at the games have been delivered by a military police colonel who is in charge of security and who focuses mostly on policing issues.

In general, information on risk management systems and structures have not been made public, which has raised questions about the robustness of ERM at the Rio games.

“In large scale events, especially when there is taxpayers’ money involved, there is a deep obligation to have the most transparent processes in place,” said Joanna Makomaski, president of Baldwin Global Solutions, who was the vice president of ERM with the Toronto 2015 Organizing Committee of the Pan American Games.

Rodrigo Amaral is a freelance writer specializing in Latin American and European risk management and insurance markets. He can be reached at [email protected]
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Sponsored: Liberty Mutual Insurance

Buyers Beware: General Liability Outlook May be Shifting

Buyers should focus on building a robust GI program and risk management infrastructure to lessen the impact of emerging GI trends.
By: | July 5, 2016 • 6 min read

The soothing drumbeat of “excess capital” and “soft market” to describe the general liability (GL) market is a familiar sound for brokers and buyers. Emerging GL trends, however, suggest the calm may not last.

Increasing severity of GL claims may hit some sectors like a light rain at first, if they have not already, but they could quickly feel like a pelting thunderstorm in others. A number of factors could contribute to the potential jump in GL prices for certain industry segments or exposures, possibly creating “micro” or niche hard markets in the short-term, and maybe even turning the broader market over the longer-term.

“There are trends we’re seeing that will play out slowly. Industries that carry more general liability exposure will and have been hit first and hardest, but it won’t apply across the board initially,” said David Perez, Senior Vice President and Chief Underwriting Officer, for Liberty Mutual Insurance’s National Insurance Specialty operation. “There is ample capital in the market today, which allows a poor performing account to move its policy frequently from carrier to carrier. Poorer performing classes, however, will likely face increased pricing for GL policies and a reduction in capacity.”

The good news for buyers is that they can take action today to lessen the impact these trends and the evolving market may have on their GL programs.

David Perez on the state of the GL market.

Medical and Litigation Trends Drive Severity

One factor increasing claim severity is the rising cost of health care, driven both by greater demand and by medical inflation that is growing faster than the Consumer Price index.

The impact of rising medical costs on commercial auto is well-known. Businesses with heavy transportation exposures are finding it more difficult to obtain coverage, or are paying more for it.

That same trend will impact general liability, just on a slower and more fragmented basis.

LM_SponsoredContent“In light of these trends, brokers and buyers should seek to understand how effectively their current or potential insurers defend GL claims, particular in using evidence-based medicine to assess and value the medical portion of a claim, and how they can provide necessary care to claimants while still helping clients control their total cost of risk.”

— David Perez, Senior Vice President & Chief Underwriting Officer, National Insurance Specialty, Liberty Mutual Insurance

“It takes longer for medical inflation to register through the tort system in general liability than it does in auto liability (AL) because auto claims are generally resolved more quickly,” Perez said. “But the same factors affecting severity in AL also exist in GL and as a result, it’s foreseeable that we will not only see similar severity trends in GL, but they may in fact be worse than we’ve seen in commercial auto.”

Industries with greater exposure to severity in general liability claims should be the first wave of companies to notice the impact of medical inflation.

“Medical inflation will drive up costs across the board, but sectors like construction and product manufacturing have a higher relative exposure for personal injury lawsuits.”

The impact of medical inflation on the GL market.

Beyond medical inflation, two litigation trends are increasing GL damages. First, plaintiffs’ lawyers are seeking to migrate the use of life care plans—traditionally employed only for truly catastrophic injuries—to more routine claims.  Perez recalled one claimant with a broken thumb and torn ligaments who sought as much as $1 million in care for the injury for the rest of his life.

Second, the number of allegations of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) in GL claims is growing.  It can be difficult to predict TBI outcomes initially and poor outcomes can be expensive and long tailed.

“In light of these trends, brokers and buyers should seek to understand how effectively their current or potential insurers defend GL claims, particular in using evidence-based medicine to assess and value the medical portion of a claim, and how they can provide necessary care to claimants while still helping clients control their total cost of risk,” notes Perez.

Changing Legal Landscape

Medical inflation and litigation trends are not the only issues impacting general liability.

Unanticipated changes in court interpretations of policy language can throw unexpected pressure on GL pricing and capacity.

Courts sometimes issue rulings interpreting policy language in a manner that expands coverage well beyond the underwriter’s original intent. Such opinions may sometimes have a retroactive effect, resulting in an immediate impact on not only open, but also closed cases in some circumstances.

Shifts in the Marketplace

In addition to facing price increases, GL brokers and buyers will be challenged by slightly shrinking capacity due to consolidation and repositioning among carriers in the marketplace. “Some major carriers have scaled back their GL writing, resulting in a migration of experienced senior management. As these executives leave, they take their GL expertise and relationships with them, resulting in fewer market leaders and less innovation,” Perez said.

“Additionally, there are new carriers coming into the business that may not have the historical GL loss data to proactively identify trends or the financial strength and experience to effectively service their GL customers and brokers. Both trends make it important for brokers and buyers to work with an insurer that is committed to the GL market and has the understanding and resources to help better manage risks impacting customers.”

Last year saw a high level of mergers and acquisitions in the insurance industry. Buyers should take advantage of that disruption to re-evaluate their needs and whether their insurers are meeting them.  Or better yet, anticipating them.

What’s a Buyer to Do?

Buyers—and their brokers— should look to partner with insurers that can spot emerging trends and offer creative solutions to address them proactively.

What should buyers and brokers do, given the trends facing the GL market?

“Brokers and buyers should value insurers that have not only durability and a long history in the general liability business, but also a strong risk management infrastructure,” Perez said. “Your insurer should be able to help you mitigate your specific risks, and complement that with coverage that works for you.”

Beyond robust GL claims and legal management, Liberty Mutual also provides access to one of the insurance industry’s largest risk control departments to help improve safety and mitigate both claim frequency and severity.

In addition, notes Perez, “Even if a company has a less than optimal loss history in general liability, there can be options to provide adequate coverage for that company. The key is to partner with an insurer that has the best-in-class expertise, creativity, and flexibility to make it happen.”

By working closely with their insurers to understand trends and their potential impacts, brokers and buyers can better prepare for the possible GL storm on the horizon.

To learn more about Liberty Mutual’s general liability offering, visit https://business.libertymutualgroup.com/business-insurance/coverages/general-liability-insurance-policy.

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This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with Liberty Mutual Insurance. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.

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Liberty Mutual Insurance offers a wide range of insurance products and services, including general liability, property, commercial automobile, excess casualty, workers compensation and group benefits.
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