Opportunities in Cuba

Greenberg on Cuba

The easing of travel restrictions to Cuba is bound to open up opportunities.
By: | March 12, 2015 • 3 min read
Havana

On a visit to Moscow in 1964, Hank Greenberg noticed a picture of a Havana office building on the desk of an official with the Soviet insurance company Ingosstrakh.

“That looks like the building where my company housed its insurance operations,” Greenberg — who was in Moscow seeking a travel risk reinsurance deal — told the official.

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The C.V. Starr Companies had an office in Havana – pictured above – between 1943 and 1958.

“That may be,” the Soviet official replied. “Now it is the building where Ingosstrakh houses the Soviet Union’s Cuban operations,” he added.

“Please take care of that building,” Greenberg told the official. “We will get it back … soon.”

More than 50 years after Greenberg made that bold statement, as recounted in his 2013 book “The AIG Story,” the day that Starr Companies takes possession of its former property in Havana is not yet here.

“Change must come about, but how fast? I can’t answer that.” – Hank Greenberg, CEO and Chairman of the Starr Companies.

With the recent easing of travel restrictions to Cuba by the U.S. government, however, Starr Companies’ executives are checking on the condition and ownership of the building just the same.

Untangling the history of that Havana building is just one of the opportunities that are on the minds of business people in the United States since travel restrictions to Cuba were eased in January.

Greenberg expresses the hope that his company can one day re-open an insurance operation in Havana. At the same time, Greenberg said that there is much work yet to be done, on the part of both the public and the private sector, before anything like that can happen.

“Both governments have got to agree on the speed by which normalization would come into being,” Greenberg said.

Hank Greenberg CEO and Chairman Starr Companies

Hank Greenberg
CEO and Chairman
Starr Companies

Since the restrictions were eased, Greenberg reports that the Starr Companies’ travel services subsidiary Assist-Card International Holdings, which it acquired in 2011, is already seeing an uptick in inquiries from businesspeople interested in its travel protection services in Cuba.

“From what we can discern, there is a great deal of interest and a pent-up need to travel,” Greenberg said.

The hotel and restaurant business, agriculture and travel-related industries like cruise shipping and aviation are just a few of the industries that will see opportunities in nearby Cuba as relationships between that country and the United States open up.

There will also be an intense interest, Greenberg said, for people of Cuban descent who are United States citizens eager to visit their origin country.

However, more evolution in government relations must occur before many of those dreams can become a reality.

“Change must come about, but how fast? I can’t answer that,” Greenberg said.

One thing Greenberg is certain of. Free trade is the quickest route to building lasting bonds between the United States and Cuba.

“I think that where trade increases between countries generally you see change in attitudes and building better trust between countries. You learn from each other, it’s a faster way to normalize relations than anything I can think of,” Greenberg said.

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Greenberg stressed that Assist-Card International isn’t the only U.S.-based insurance company or subsidiary in the travel risk business.

The Starr chairman indicated though that he expects his company to be a strong competitor.

“The challenges of doing business in Cuba are substantial,” Greenberg said.

“But Starr is well-positioned and prepared to leverage our relationships and global network to support our clients’ entry into this market.”

Dan Reynolds is editor-in-chief of Risk & Insurance. He can be reached at dreynolds@lrp.com.
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Mergers & Acquisitions

And Back Again

Hank Greenberg, who made his first insurance deal in China in 1975, returns and buys a state-owned insurer.
By: | March 2, 2015 • 7 min read
03012015_08_China_Shanghai_PB

The first time Hank Greenberg visited China, in 1975, there were few cars on the streets and seemingly thousands of wobbly bicycles crowding the roads. The high-rises that now dominate the skylines of China’s major cities were non-existent.

That was the way Greenberg remembered China in his 2013 book, “The AIG Story,” co-written with Lawrence Cunningham, a George Washington University law professor.

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Following the opening of Communist China in 1972 by President Richard Nixon and his Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, Greenberg — then CEO of AIG — sought and cemented during that 1975 visit a reinsurance agreement between AIG and the state-owned People’s Insurance Co. of China.

Greenberg was infamously pushed out of AIG in 2005, after four decades spent building it into a company with assets in the hundreds of billions.

Over the years though, Greenberg’s love of China, particularly Shanghai, never ebbed.

“I have very warm feelings for Shanghai,” Greenberg told Risk & Insurance® during an interview in his Park Avenue office.

After all, the C.V. Starr Co. was founded by Greenberg’s mentor Cornelius Vander Starr in Shanghai in 1919.

“China is not without its problems, obviously. But it’s the second largest economy in the world. Think about that. The second largest economy in the world in a very brief period of time,” Greenberg said.

Last year, Greenberg’s Starr bought a former state-owned insurance company, announcing that it had acquired 93 percent of the Dazhong Insurance Co.

“It wasn’t a walk in the park. It took a lot of negotiation and a lot of time.” — Hank Greenberg, CEO and Chairman, Starr Companies

Starr purchased approximately 20 percent of the company in 2011 before increasing its stake to 93 percent in March 2014, according to published reports.

“Even though we had management, we didn’t have freedom of management — big difference — and so I spoke with the people in Shanghai and over time we were able to convince them that the company would do better over any period of time if we had not only operating control but financial control,” Greenberg said.

The purchase was not without its struggles, according to Starr’s chairman.

“It wasn’t a walk in the park. It took a lot of negotiation and a lot of time,” said Greenberg. But Greenberg believes that over time, the investment will be well worth it.

Falling Barriers

With a population of 1.4 billion, China is viewed by many industries, property/casualty insurers included, as a country with enormous potential.

Recent regulatory changes, in particular the decision three years ago by Chinese regulators to allow foreign insurers to underwrite mandatory third-party auto liability, are viewed positively by Western insurance and business executives.

And those observers think more good news is on the way. “In and of itself it is a very critical step and it is clear that the intent is to broaden that further,” said Mark Wheeler, London-based CEO of Ironshore International, of that milestone third-party auto liability change.

“It was a major positive development for foreign insurers,” said Dave Snyder, vice president of international policy for the industry trade group the Property Casualty Insurance Association of America.

“We are very encouraged by high-level statements and are anxious, as always, to see them implemented.” — Dave Snyder, vice president of international policy for the Property Casualty Insurance Association of America.

Snyder said the trade group, which represents more than 1,000 insurers, continues to be encouraged by statements from Chinese government officials that they intend to open the country further to foreign insurance carriers.

“I’m reluctant to use terms like positive or negative. It is what it is,” Snyder said.

“But we are very encouraged by high-level statements and are anxious, as always, to see them implemented,” Snyder said.

“We believe there is an environment of honesty, if you will, between the governments and the private sector and the private sector and governments. That has improved significantly over time with benefits for both China and the U.S.,” Snyder said.

“It would also be fair to say that the market isn’t opening as quickly as we would expect,” Ironshore’s Wheeler said.

“A good example of that would be the much-heralded Shanghai Free Trade Zone,” he said.

Mark Wheeler CEO Ironshore International

Mark Wheeler
CEO
Ironshore International

“There was a lot of press coverage around that 12 months ago, but there is little evidence to see that it has driven much traction,” Wheeler said.

Starr and Ironshore work in partnership in some lines and sectors. Ironshore CEO Kevin Kelley is an AIG alumnus who retains great respect for his mentor Hank Greenberg.

Kelley told Risk & Insurance® in 2013 there was “no doubt in his mind” that if Greenberg stayed as CEO that AIG would have remained whole during the crisis of 2008.

The Starr Aviation Agency Inc. is the underwriter for Ironshore’s aviation products, and the two carriers have joined forces in the Iron-Starr Excess Agency, a managing general underwriting agency that underwrites financial lines and specialty casualty with both carriers providing capacity.

Wheeler said it looks like the Starr Group has skirted some barriers to entry with the Dazhong acquisition.

“An acquisition like the one they made makes every sense to me in that context. Just because of the barriers to entry, having something that is already laid out on the ground, with distribution lines and speed to market,” Wheeler said.

Regulatory and cultural barriers in China are falling, but there are complexities for property/casualty insurers to consider there, as there would be in any economy.

“Whilst the opportunities are significant, there are a number of key challenges to overcome, including complex regulatory hurdles, disparity in value, fit with local partners and the need to operate flexibly in a rapidly evolving market,” wrote Joan Wong, a transaction services partner with KPMG China in an April 2014 report by KPMG on the Chinese insurance market.

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For his part, Greenberg said he doesn’t see the regulatory hurdles in China as much more complex than those a carrier faces in the U.S., where a carrier needs the separate approval of regulators in 50 states.

“I don’t know if it’s any more difficult than the regulatory environment in the United States,” Greenberg said. “I don’t think so. I think they have their regulations like every country does.”

Combining Cultures

Greenberg said that since the March announcement, the process of combining the professional cultures of Starr and the Dazhong Insurance Co. is coming along, but will take some time.

“It has gone pretty well,” he said. “It’s not going to happen overnight,” he added.

Greenberg said he is devoting a lot of resources to training local hires as well as bringing in talent with experience working in the United States, London and elsewhere.

Hank Greenberg CEO and Chairman Starr Companies

Hank Greenberg
CEO and Chairman
Starr Companies

According to Alex Yip, CEO of Lockton Cos. for Greater China, the issues of regulatory compliance and integrating work cultures are of paramount importance for insurance companies that want to do business in China.

“It is, understandably, a challenge for a U.S.-based company to integrate its business with a local Chinese entity,” Yip said.

“The day-to-day differences are enormous, and include history, culture, corporate mentality, value propositions and ways of doing business, to name just a few common challenges,” Yip said.

“It is often underestimated just how different we can be from one another,” Yip said.

What’s also often underestimated, according to the analysts at KPMG, are the expectations of Chinese consumers.

According to KPMG, Chinese consumers are highly likely to use social media and other channels to communicate their expectations of and experience with service providers to their fellow consumers.

For the banking, general and life insurance sectors, around 70 percent of Chinese respondents to a KPMG survey recommended their banks and insurers to others. That’s compared to between 21 to 53 percent of those surveyed in other countries.

Although industry advocates hope for a day when foreign carriers can sell a variety of coverages to Chinese consumers and businesses online, Greenberg said there will always be the need for sophisticated underwriters and brokers in highly CAT-exposed China.

“It will never be adaptable to large, complicated risks,” Greenberg said of the online selling channel.

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“That will still be done through the brokers and companies that have the sophistication to write those kinds of risks,” he said.

“But there is an awful lot of business that can be produced online and through social media.”

There are barriers to entry in China and insurance penetration there is in its beginning stages.

But according to Greenberg, once that country of 1.4 billion becomes more of a consumer economy, it will take off, and the insurance business right along with it.

“Once China becomes less dependent on exports and more dependent on the domestic economy, it’s going to soar,” Greenberg said.

Dan Reynolds is editor-in-chief of Risk & Insurance. He can be reached at dreynolds@lrp.com.
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Sponsored: Liberty Mutual Insurance

2015 General Liability Renewal Outlook

As the GL insurance cycle flattens, risk managers, brokers and insurers dig deeper to manage program costs.
By: | March 2, 2015 • 5 min read
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There was a time, not too long ago, when prices for general liability (GL) insurance would fluctuate significantly.

Prices would decrease as new markets offered additional capacity and wanted to gain a foothold by winning business with attractive rates. Conversely, prices could be driven higher by decreases in capacity — caused by either significant losses or departing markets.

This “insurance cycle” was driven mostly by market forces of supply and demand instead of the underlying cost of the risk. The result was unstable markets — challenging buyers, brokers and carriers.

However, as risk managers and their brokers work on 2015 renewals, they’ll undoubtedly recognize that prices are relatively stable. In fact, prices have been stable for the last several years in spite of many events and developments that might have caused fluctuations in the past.

Mark Moitoso discusses general liability pricing and the flattening of the insurance cycle.

Flattening the GL insurance cycle

Any discussion of today’s stable GL market has to start with data and analytics.

These powerful new capabilities offer deeper insight into trends and uncover new information about risks. As a result, buyers, brokers and insurers are increasingly mining data, monitoring trends and building in-house analytical staff.

“The increased focus on analytics is what’s kept pricing fairly stable in the casualty world,” said Mark Moitoso, executive vice president and general manager, National Accounts Casualty at Liberty Mutual Insurance.

With the increased use of analytics, all parties have a better understanding of trends and cost drivers. It’s made buyers, brokers and carriers much more sophisticated and helped pricing reflect actual risk and costs, rather than market cycle.

The stability of the GL market also reflects many new sources of capital that have entered the market over the past few years. In fact, today, there are roughly three times as many insurers competing for a GL risk than three years ago.

Unlike past fluctuations in capacity, this appears to be a fundamental shift in the competitive landscape.

SponsoredContent_LM“The current risk environment underscores the value of the insurer, broker and buyer getting together to figure out the exposures they have, and the best ways to manage them, through risk control, claims management and a strategic risk management program.”
— David Perez, executive vice president and general manager, Commercial Insurance Specialty, Liberty Mutual

Dynamic risks lurking

The proliferation of new insurance companies has not been matched by an influx of new underwriting talent.

The result is the potential dilution of existing talent, creating an opportunity for insurers and brokers with talent and expertise to add even greater value to buyers by helping them understand the new and continuing risks impacting GL.

And today’s business environment presents many of these risks:

  • Mass torts and class-action lawsuits: Understanding complex cases, exhausting subrogation opportunities, and wrangling with multiple plaintiffs to settle a case requires significant expertise and skill.
  • Medical cost inflation: A 2014 PricewaterhouseCoopers report predicts a medical cost inflation rate of 6.8 percent. That’s had an immediate impact in increasing loss costs per commercial auto claim and it will eventually extend to longer-tail casualty businesses like GL.
  • Legal costs: Hourly rates as well as award and settlement costs are all increasing.
  • Industry and geographic factors: A few examples include the energy sector struggling with growing auto losses and construction companies working in New York state contending with the antiquated New York Labor Law

David Perez outlines the risks general liability buyers and brokers currently face.

Managing GL costs in a flat market

While the flattening of the GL insurance cycle removes a key source of expense volatility for risk managers, emerging risks present many challenges.

With the stable market creating general price parity among insurers, it’s more important than ever to select underwriting partners based on their expertise, experience and claims handling record – in short, their ability to help better manage the total cost of GL.

And the key word is indeed “partners.”

“The current risk environment underscores the value of the insurer, broker and buyer getting together to figure out the exposures they have, and the best ways to manage them — through risk control, claims management and a strategic risk management program,” said David Perez, executive vice president and general manager, Commercial Insurance Specialty at Liberty Mutual.

While analytics and data are key drivers to the underwriting process, the complete picture of a company’s risk profile is never fully painted by numbers alone. This perspective is not universally understood and is a key differentiator between an experienced underwriter and a simple analyst.

“We have the ability to influence underwriting decisions based on experience with the customer, knowledge of that customer, and knowledge of how they handle their own risks — things that aren’t necessarily captured in the analytical environment,” said Moitoso.

Mark Moitoso suggests looking at GL spend like one would look at total cost of risk.

Several other factors are critical in choosing an insurance partner that can help manage the total cost of your GL program:

Clear, concise contracts: The policy contract language often determines the outcome of a GL case. Investing time up-front to strategically address risk transfer through contractual language can control GL claim costs.

“A lot of the efficacy we find in claims is driven by the clear intent that’s delivered by the policy,” said Perez.

Legal cost management: Two other key drivers of GL claim outcomes are settlement and trial. The best GL programs include sophisticated legal management approaches that aggressively contain legal costs while also maximizing success factors.

“Buyers and brokers must understand the value an insurer can provide in managing legal outcomes and spending,” noted Perez. “Explore if and how the insurer evaluates potential providers in light of the specific jurisdiction and injury; reviews legal bills; and offers data-driven tools that help negotiations by tracking the range of settlements for similar cases.”

David Perez on managing legal costs.

Specialized claims approach: Resolving claims quickly and fairly is best accomplished by knowledgeable professionals. Working with an insurer whose claims organization is comprised of professionals with deep expertise in specific industries or risk categories is vital.

SponsoredContent_LM“We have the ability to influence underwriting decisions based on experience with the customer, knowledge of that customer, and knowledge of how they handle their own risks, things that aren’t necessarily captured in the analytical environment.”
— Mark Moitoso, executive vice president and general manager, National Accounts Casualty, Liberty Mutual

“When a claim comes in the door, we assess the situation and determine whether it can be handled as a general claim, or whether it’s a complex case,” said Moitoso. “If it’s a complex case, we make sure it goes to the right professional who understands the industry segment and territory. Having that depth and ability to access so many points of expertise and institutional knowledge is a big differentiator for us.”

While the GL insurance market cycle appears to be flattening, basic risk management continues to be essential in managing total GL costs. Close partnership between buyer, broker and insurer is critical to identifying all the GL risks faced by a company and developing a strategic risk management program to effectively mitigate and manage them.

Additional insights



For more information about how Liberty Mutual can help you manage the total cost of your GL program, visit their website or contact your broker.

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This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with Liberty Mutual Insurance. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.




Liberty Mutual Insurance offers a wide range of insurance products and services, including general liability, property, commercial automobile, excess casualty, workers compensation and group benefits.
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