Risk Insider: Joe Tocco

Expanded Canal Creates Greater Opportunities … and Risks

By: | July 6, 2016 • 2 min read
Currently Chief Executive of the Americas for XL Catlin’s insurance operation, Joe Tocco has enjoyed three decades in the insurance industry at various organizations. He is also a veteran of the U.S. Navy, where he served as a nuclear field service engineer. He can be reached at [email protected]

An international consortium of companies built a new third lane and set of locks at the Panama Canal that doubles its capacity.

Like other massive infrastructure projects, the expansion effort faced an assortment of challenges. Nonetheless, on June 26, the Chinese container ship Costco Shipping Panama became the first vessel to pass through the new third lane; its name was changed to respect the honor of being the first “New Panamax”-sized ship to transit the canal.

Building Bridges

Doubling the capacity of the Panama Canal should increase trade flows between Asia and the Americas, as well as between Latin America and North America.

For example, about 10 percent of the Asia-to-U.S. container traffic could shift from the West Coast to the East Coast by 2020. A larger Panama Canal also offers an attractive alternative for shipping bulk commodities from the U.S. heartland to Asia via the Mississippi River.

For starters, bigger ships mean more accumulation risk. It’s estimated that the additional cargo moving through the canal each day will be worth about $1.25 billion. And that figure doesn’t include the vessels queuing at both ends of the canal.

And as natural gas production has surged in the U.S., producers are looking to develop new markets in Asia; an expanded Panama Canal could help facilitate that.

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For Latin America, the canal’s greater capacity could lead to increased deliveries of agricultural and other products to Asia. Similarly, we could soon see more shipments of perishable products like meat and fish, fresh produce and cut flowers from Latin America to North America.

A More Complex Risk Landscape

Doubling the canal’s capacity will also alter the risk landscape in Panama and elsewhere.

For starters, bigger ships mean more accumulation risk. It’s estimated that the additional cargo moving through the canal each day will be worth about $1.25 billion. And that figure doesn’t include the vessels queuing at both ends of the canal.

Operational risks at the canal are also potentially greater. In the original locks, electric locomotives on the lock walls pull the vessel along. In the new third lane, tugs positioned fore and aft will escort ships through the locks.

While canal pilots and tugboat captains have undergone extensive training, concerns have been expressed about the possibility of a tug losing control of the tow, resulting in damage to the lock as well as the ship. The maneuverability of the tugs selected for this task has also been questioned.

Given the Panama Canal’s prominent role in today’s supply chains, the impacts of an incident that takes the third lane offline would ripple quickly through the global economy, especially if the shutdown is protracted. Latin American companies shipping perishable products to North America, for example, could be especially affected by such an event.

Ports that have expanded, or are being expanded, to handle New Panamax (and larger) vessels also face greater accumulation and operational risks. And for ports on the East Coast of the U.S., the risks are amplified by the ongoing threat posed by hurricanes.

While it is too soon to determine how this expansion effort will reverberate throughout the Americas and across the globe, the canal should nonetheless continue to play a significant part in the ongoing march to a smaller world and a larger global economy.

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Supply Chain Risks

Driving Blindfolded

Many small and mid-size businesses underestimate their exposure to supply chain disruption.
By: | April 4, 2016 • 5 min read
R4-16p64-65_7SME.indd

Last November, a global study of 3,000 small and mid-size enterprises (SMEs) found that only one in seven SMEs think their business would be significantly affected if they lost their main supplier.

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Overall, 39 percent of SMEs consider themselves at risk from the loss of their main supplier, yet 55 percent believe it would not influence their day-to-day business.

Meanwhile, the “2015 Supply Chain Resilience Study” by Zurich and the Business Continuity Institute (BCI) found that while 74 percent of companies experienced at least one supply chain disruption in the last year, only half of those disruptions were known to originate from Tier 1 (immediate) suppliers, and 72 percent of respondents admitted they did not have full visibility into their supply chain.

“Supply chain risk is a blind spot for a lot of organizations.” — Karl Bryant, senior vice president at Marsh Risk Consulting

“This makes us believe that SMEs probably underestimate their supply chains risk exposure, and we urge them to reassess this,” said Nick Wildgoose, Zurich’s global supply chain product leader. He added that visibility and resilience along supply chains are major sources of competitive advantage.

BCI warned that organizations could be “driving blindfolded into a disaster.”

Companies at most risk are those reliant on “sole source” suppliers — one-of-a-kind manufacturers whose components are either of unique quality or are unavailable elsewhere in the market.

In today’s lean manufacturing era, fewer companies keep spare inventory, so if a critical component ceases to be available it can quickly prevent a company from producing its core product or service, leading to lost revenue, diminished service, dissatisfied customers and, in extreme cases, business closure.

Lurking Risks

Supply chain risk lurks in many forms. According to the BCI, IT and telecoms outages, adverse weather, and for the first time, cyber attacks/data breaches are

Karl Bryant, senior vice president, Marsh Risk Consulting

Karl Bryant, senior vice president, Marsh Risk Consulting

the top three causes of supply chain disruption. Another emerging risk is “business ethics,” which placed in the top 10 for first time.

“Supply chain risk is a blind spot for a lot of organizations,” said Karl Bryant, senior vice president at Marsh Risk Consulting.

Complacency that suppliers have everything under control can be a problem, said

Ken Katz, property risk control director at Travelers.

“When a risk exists outside your own four walls and you are focusing on your core business there is reduced visibility to the potential destruction it can cause,” Katz said.

To make matters worse for SMEs, smaller companies are likely to feel the effects of a supply shortage first as suppliers will invariably prioritize their biggest accounts if outflow is reduced.

R4-16p64-65_7SME.inddAn obvious risk mitigation strategy is to have a stockpile of spare inventory, but such an approach is not popular in these austere times.

“I’d love to see companies with six months’ supply, or matching supply against their expected downtime and their assets, but that’s a losing battle — no one wants inventory these days,” said Bryant.

Former RIMS President Rick Roberts, director of risk management and employee benefits at Ensign-Bickford Industries (EBI), said supply chain disruption is a “huge issue. People who’ve never had a problem often sit back and don’t pay much attention, but up-front work is critical because when a problem hits it can be major.”

Roberts, whose company is both a customer and supplier, said some of EBI’s customers require his company to keep a number of months’ worth of supply as inventory as part of their agreement. However, few SMEs have the leverage to wield this kind of influence.

Risk Assessment

To fully understand their supply chain exposures, Bryant suggested SMEs conduct a “value segmentation” exercise, identifying mission-critical areas of their

Ken Katz, property risk control director, Travelers

Ken Katz, property risk control director, Travelers

business, such as those that generate the highest margins or growth.

Then, Katz said, they should conduct a “business impact analysis,” simulating the repercussions of vital components being undeliverable.

It is also essential for SMEs to get to know their suppliers’ finances and quality of work as best they can, he said.

Bryant said that companies should compile a matrix of their supply chain in as much detail as possible, including suppliers of suppliers, and if possible, the exposure of suppliers’ plants and operations (as opposed to regional offices) to natural catastrophe such as flood or earthquake.

SMEs should ask all their suppliers what business continuity plans and insurance they have in place, and get clarity on exactly how they will be treated should the supplier run into problems.

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However, warned Bryant: “It can take a lot of man hours to send out questionnaires, follow up on them and pull the information together in a meaningful way, and many smaller companies don’t have the resources to invest in that kind of process.”

Nevertheless, this is information that empowers risk managers to make informed continuity plans. This could include, for example, finding alternative single source suppliers or new methods of production in case a sole source supplier fails to deliver, or even potentially acquire that supplier to ensure it stays in business.

There must also be a communications strategy for dealing with clients and negotiating delays. “You need a good explanation that is more sophisticated than ‘we can’t help you, I’m sorry’,” said Bryant.

Rick Roberts, director of risk management and employee benefits, Ensign-Bickford Industries

Rick Roberts, director of risk management and employee benefits, Ensign-Bickford Industries

Continuity planning, he said, requires a coordinated approach between risk and operational departments to ensure that gathered data is optimally leveraged. According to the BCI, only 54 percent of SMEs currently have a business continuity plan, compared to 74 percent of large organizations.

It also found that nearly six in 10 SMEs don’t insure losses from supply chain disruption, even though contingent business interruption (CBI) insurance would compensate for lost revenues during a supply problem.

This usually applies only to an insured’s first tier of suppliers, and can only be acquired if the SME has business interruption coverage.

Roberts would like to see more insurers extend coverage to second tier suppliers. “It can be expensive, and you can’t always see the benefits of being proactive — but when you get hit with a loss you’ll wish you had been prepared.” &

Antony Ireland is a London-based financial journalist. He can be reached at [email protected]
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Sponsored: Liberty Mutual Insurance

Using Data to Get Through Hail and Back

Commercial property owners must take action to mitigate the risk of hail-related damage.
By: | September 14, 2016 • 6 min read

4,600 hailstorms have rained down on the U.S. as of the end of July according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. And these storms have left damage behind, cracking unprotected skylights, damaging exterior siding, dimpling rooftops and destroying HVAC systems.

While storm frequency is almost on par with last year’s 5,400, the rest of the picture isn’t quite the same. For example, the hail zone seems to be shifting south. San Antonio, Texas, a “moderate” hazard hail zone area, typically sees four or five hail storms a year, on average.  Year to date, more than 30 storms have been reported. Overall, Texas has suffered nearly 20 percent of all hail storms this year.

Liberty Mutual’s Ralph Tiede discusses the risk hail poses to large commercial property owners.

The resulting damage is different too, with air conditioning (AC) units accounting for more than a third of the insurance industry’s losses, a greater proportion than in previous years.  “In some cases, we’ve seen properties that sustained no roof damage but had heavily damaged AC systems. This may be a result of smaller hail stone size coupled with high winds,” noted Ralph Tiede, Vice President of Commercial Insurance and Manager of Property Risk Engineering at Liberty Mutual.

Despite the shifting trends, however, these losses are largely preventable if commercial property owners understand their exposures and take steps to mitigate them. By partnering with the right insurer, a company can gain access to the industry-leading resources and expertise to make it happen.

Understanding the Risk through Data

A property owner might know that his property is located in an area prone to hail, but could underestimate the extent of damage a storm could cause. Exposed skylights, solar panels, satellite dishes and other roof-mounted equipment can translate to serious losses.

Three trends that have emerged this hail season.

This is where Liberty Mutual’s property loss control engineers offer critical guidance for customers with large property exposures.

“Our property loss control engineers go out and inspect locations to develop loss estimates,” said Tiede. “They’re looking at the age and condition of the roof, the material it’s made of, and whether equipment is exposed or if there are adequate safeguards in place.”

Liberty Mutual can combine this detail with the hail data it has collected for more than 14 years and use this extensive library to help customers understand their exposures. The company’s proprietary hail tool looks at customer-specific factors, such as roof type, age, condition and geocodes, to better identify potential losses from hail. The tool provides a more detailed view of hail exposure on a micro level, as opposed to more traditional macro views based on zip codes.

“This way, we’re not just looking at a location’s exposure, we’re looking at an account’s cumulative hail exposure and providing a better understanding of where the risk is concentrated,” Tiede said.

Having a good understanding of a company’s specific exposure helps the broker, buyer, and insurer develop an effective insurance program. “Two customers may be in the same area, but if one’s building has a hail resistant roof, protected skylights, and hail guards for HVAC equipment and the other’s has unprotected sky lights and no hail guards or screens on rooftop equipment, they are going to have different levels of exposure. In both scenarios, we can design an insurance program that fits the customer’s situation and helps control the total cost of property risk,” said Brent Chambers, Underwriting Consultant for National Insurance Property at Liberty Mutual.

A Liberty Mutual property loss control engineer consults with the customer on ways to reduce or mitigate the exposure from hail so that the customer can make an informed decision as to where to deploy capital. “It’s not just about protecting a building’s roof and rooftop equipment.  Roof damage can lead to extensive water damage inside a building and in some cases disrupt service, both of which can be costly for a business. By focusing on locations with the most exposure, a risk manager is better able to mitigate future losses,” said Tiede.

Actions commercial property owners can take to mitigate the risk of hail-related damage.

Liberty Mutual property loss control engineers also provide recommendations specific to each location. “We know that hail guards work, so we encourage clients to use those to protect HVAC equipment,” said Ronnie Smith, Senior Account Engineer for National Insurance Property at Liberty Mutual. “Condenser coils in air conditioning systems are fragile and easily damaged, and units don’t necessarily come with built-in protection. It’s important for property owners to take this step proactively to prevent a loss.”

The average cost to fix a condenser coil is $500, but replacing a coil can run at least $500 per ton of cooling, a measurement of air conditioning capacity that refers to the amount of heat needed to melt a ton of ice over a 24-hour period. As one ton of cooling typically covers about 250 square feet of interior space, replacement costs can quickly add up.

Replacing an entire AC unit can run more than $1,000 per ton of cooling. In a 250,000 square foot property, the replacement could easily reach $1 million. Given the increase in hail-related AC damage this year, these are numbers worth knowing.

Other risk mitigation recommendations include regular roof maintenance, such as inspections and repairs to small damages like blisters and installing protective screens over skylights.

“If a roof needs replacing, we also suggest using materials that have been tested and approved by an independent certification laboratory and are durable enough to fit the location’s exposures,” Tiede said. “The last thing a commercial property owner wants is to replace a roof again six months after it’s installed. Experience has shown that ballasted-type roofs are the most resistant to hail damage.”

Using Data to Develop Solutions

When a property owner has an understanding of the size of its exposure and potential losses, it is better able to work with its agent or broker and insurer to develop an insurance program to manage and mitigate potential risks.

“The data and advice we provide help clients focus on the largest risks and better mitigate that exposure,” Smith said. “The more data you have, the more you can understand your risk on a granular level and manage it.”

This data-driven approach to preparedness makes Liberty particularly well-suited to serve large commercial properties with multiple locations in high risk areas.

Prices for roof and air conditioning repairs and replacements have risen over last year, Tiede said, and are likely to grow more expensive as older equipment becomes obsolete. Property owners will be forced to buy newer, pricier replacements than perhaps they had originally planned for.

And if this year’s storm trends are any indication, hail is sometimes an unpredictable foe.

Amidst these shifting trends, the value of an insurer’s expertise in identifying, mitigating and managing hail exposure will be immeasurable to large commercial property owners.

For more information about Liberty Mutual’s commercial property coverage, visit https://business.libertymutualgroup.com/business-insurance.

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This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with Liberty Mutual Insurance. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.

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Liberty Mutual Insurance offers a wide range of insurance products and services, including general liability, property, commercial automobile, excess casualty, workers compensation and group benefits.
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