On-Demand Webinar

Webinar – How to Maximize ROI in Your Cyber Risk Mitigation Efforts

Find the right balance between mitigating and transferring cyber risk to maximize ROI and validate your approach with the C-suites and the board of directors.
By: | April 6, 2016 • 2 min read

Presenters

SOA_Webinar

Overview

Webinar Sponsor

Webinar Sponsor

A survey of 248 risk managers from around the world reports that 65 percent include cyber security among their top five emerging risks (23 percent as their top emerging risk), and 15 percent identify cyber risk as the top current risk.

While insurance carriers are making more capital available to counter it, the amount of unknowns in cyber risk far outweigh the knowns; chiefly a lack of cyber-related loss history to determine adequate pricing. At the same time boards of directors are pressuring risk managers to buy cyber coverage.

A sound risk management approach involves investing the right amount in risk mitigation to secure your systems; while at the same time taking into account the capacity and limitations of cyber coverage.

This webinar will give risk managers insights to make better decisions when it comes to investing valuable resources in cyber risk mitigation, and an actuarial perspective on cyber coverage; i.e., when it’s appropriate to buy it and how much coverage should be sought.

An expert panel will discuss:

  • The history of cyber risk and the growing degree of concern it is creating for risk managers.
  • The importance of clear communication with your board of directors and C-suites on the unknowns in cyber insurance coverage; its benefits and its limitations.
  • Actuarial insights into the challenges faced by insurance carriers in underwriting cyber risks and how underwriters are arriving at insurance premiums.
  • Analyzing the costs and benefits of cyber risk mitigation and insurance coverage to improve the ROI.
  • Building the teamwork and stakeholder buy-in to adequately fund risk mitigation strategies and acquire insurance coverage as needed.

The Recording

Download a PDF slide deck of the presentation.




Dan Reynolds is editor-in-chief of Risk & Insurance. He can be reached at [email protected]
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On-Demand Webinar

Insights Webinar – How Nurse Case Managers Add Value to Workers’ Compensation Claims

Learn the quantifiable benefits of adding a nurse to your WC claim and where they can have the biggest impact.
By: | March 17, 2016 • 2 min read

Presenters

Overview

Webinar Sponsor


Webinar Sponsor

Healthcare challenges continue to put pressure on claim costs and outcomes. Knowing when to apply the right resource to each claim can help your injured workers quickly return to work and lower your medical costs.

In this webinar, we’ll discuss the quantifiable benefits of adding a nurse to your claim and the science behind when they can have the biggest impact. By the end of this presentation, we’ll answer the following questions:

  • With medical costs constituting more than 60 percent of workers’ compensation claims expenses, does nurse case management actually help control costs or drive them higher?
  • What controls can be put in place to ensure the cost of nurse case managers doesn’t spike?
  • Which cases benefit the most from nurse case management?

Recording

Download a PDF slide deck of the presentation.




Liberty Mutual Insurance offers a wide range of insurance products and services, including general liability, property, commercial automobile, excess casualty, workers compensation and group benefits.
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Sponsored Content by CorVel

Advocacy: The Impact of Continuous Triage

Claims management is never stagnant. Utilizing a continuous triage model keeps injured employees on track to recovery.
By: | May 4, 2016 • 6 min read

SponsoredContent_CorVel

Introduction

In the world of workers’ compensation, timing is everything. Many studies have shown that the earlier a workplace incident or injury is acted upon, the more successful the results*. However, there is further evidence indicating there is even more of an impact seen when a claim is not only filed promptly, but also effective triage is conducted and management of the claim takes place consistently through closure.

Typically, every program incorporates a form of early intervention. But then what? While it is common knowledge that early claims reporting and medical treatment are the most critical parts of a claim, if left alone after management, an injured worker could – and often does – fall through the cracks.

All Claims Paths are Not Created Equal

Even with early intervention and the best intentions of the adjuster, things can still go wrong. What if we could follow one injury down two paths, resulting in two entirely different outcomes? This case study illustrates the difference between two claims management processes – one of proactive, continuous claims triage and one of inactivity after initial intervention – and the impact, or lack thereof, it can have on the outcome of a claim. By addressing all indicators, effective triage can drastically change the trajectory of a claim.

The Injury

While working at a factory, David, a 40-year-old employee, experienced sudden shoulder pain while lifting a heavy box. He reported the incident to his supervisor, who contacted their 24/7 triage call center to report the incident. After speaking with a triage nurse, the nurse recommended he go to an occupational medicine clinic for further evaluation, based on his self-reported symptoms of significant swelling, a lack of range of motion and a pain level described as greater than “8.”

The physician diagnosed David with a shoulder sprain and prescribed two weeks of rest, ice and prescription strength ibuprofen. He restricted David from any lifting over his head.

By all accounts, early intervention was working. Utilizing 24/7 nurse triage, there was no lag time between the incident and care. David received timely medical attention and had a treatment plan in place within one day.

But Wait…

A critical factor in any program is a return to work date, yet David was not given a return to work date from the physician at the occupational medicine clinic; therefore, no date was entered in the system.

One small, crucial detail needs just as much attention as when an incident is initially reported. What happens the third week of a claim is just as important as what happens on the day the injury occurs. Involvement with a claim must take place through claim closure and not just at initial triage.

The Same Old Story

After three weeks of physical therapy, no further medical interventions and a lack of communication from his adjuster, David returned to his physician complaining of continued pain. The physician encouraged him to continue physical therapy to improve his mobility and added an opioid prescription to help with his pain.

At home, with no return to work in sight, David became depressed and continued to experience pain in his shoulder. He scheduled an appointment with the physician months later, stating physical therapy was not helping. Since David’s pain had not subsided, the physician ordered an MRI, which came back negative, and wrote David a prescription for medication to manage his depression. The physician referred him to an orthopedic specialist and wrote him a new prescription for additional opioids to address his pain…

Costly medical interventions continued to accrue for the employer and the surmounting risk of the claim continued to go unmanaged. His claim was much more severe than anyone knew.

What if his injury had been managed?

A Model Example

Using a claims system that incorporated a predictive modeling rules engine, the adjuster was immediately prompted to retrieve a return to work date from the physician. Therefore, David’s file was flagged and submitted for a further level of nurse triage intervention and validation. A nurse contacted the physician and verified that there was no return to work date listed on the medical file because the physician’s initial assessment restricted David to no lifting.

As a result of these triage validations, further interventions were needed and a telephonic case manager was assigned to help coordinate care and pursue a proactive return to work plan. Working with the physical therapist and treating physician resulted in a change in David’s medication and a modified physical therapy regimen.

After a few weeks, David reported an improvement in his mobility and his pain level was a “3,” thus prompting the case manager’s request for a re-evaluation. After his assessment, the physician lifted the restriction, allowing David to lift 10 pounds overhead. With this revision, David was able to return to work at modified duty right away. Within six weeks he returned to full duty.

With access to all of the David’s data and a rules engine to keep adjusters on top of the claim, the medical interventions that were needed for his recovery were validated, therefore effectively managing his recovery by continuing to triage his claim. By coordinating care plans with the physician and the physical therapist, and involving a case manager early on, the active management of David’s claim enabled him to remain engaged in his recovery. There was no lapse in communication, treatment or activity.

CorVel’s Model

After 24/7 nurse triage is conducted and an injured worker receives initial care, CorVel’s claims system, CareMC, conducts continuous triage of all data points collected at claim inception and throughout the life of a claim utilizing its integrated rules engine. Predictive indicators send alerts to prompt the adjuster to take action when needed until the claim is closed ­– not just at the beginning of the claim.

This predictive modeling tool flags potentially complex claims with the risk for high exposure, marking claims that need intervention so that CorVel can assign appropriate resources to mitigate risk.

Claims triage is constant – that is the necessary model. Even on an adjuster’s best day, humans aren’t perfect. A rules engine helps flag things that people can miss. A combination of predictive systems and human intervention ensures claims management is never stagnant – that there is no lapse in communication, activity or treatment. With an advocacy team in the form of an adjuster empowered by a powerful rules engine and a case manager looking out for the best care, injured employees remain engaged in their recovery. By perpetuating patient advocacy, continuous triage reduces claim severity and improves claim outcomes, returning injured workers to the workforce and reducing payors’ risk.

*WCRI.

This article was produced by CorVel Corporation and not the Risk & Insurance® editorial team.



CorVel is a national provider of risk management solutions for employers, third party administrators, insurance companies and government agencies seeking to control costs and promote positive outcomes.
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