Upcoming Webinar

Workplace Violence and Active Shooter: Develop a Culture of Preparedness

On Sept 14, learn how to create an emergency response plan and prepare for an Active Shooter incident.
By: | August 23, 2016 • 2 min read

Presenters

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Event Description

Webinar Sponsor

Webinar Sponsor

When violence erupts in a workplace, the outcome and events of the scenario are unpredictable. Injury or death of building occupants, lawsuits, property damage, and diminished trust in the organization by staff and the community are just a few of the possible consequences.

The possibility of an Active Shooter Incident is no longer a question of if, but rather when and where– yet the risk for violence is difficult to predict and almost impossible to eliminate.

In most workplaces where risk factors can be identified, the risk of assault can be prevented or minimized if employers take appropriate precautions. Under the federal Occupational Health and Safety Act (OSHA), all employers have a general duty to provide a safe workplace for employees, free from recognized hazards that cause or are likely to cause death or serious physical harm to employees. OSHA believes that a well-written and implemented workplace violence prevention program, combined with engineering controls, administrative controls and training can reduce the incidence of workplace violence in both the private sector and federal workplaces.

According to an FBI survey, 45% of active shooter incidents take place in a commercial environment. In an active shooter scenario, preparation is the key to survival. Would you know what to do in the event of an active shooter selected your office to carry out their attack? Would your employees know what to do? Does your organization have an emergency preparedness plan?

Space is limited, so register today!

Attendees of this webinar will learn:

  • Understand the multiple types of workplace violence
  • Understand how to plan and develop an Active Shooter Preparedness Program
  • Learn how to create an emergency response plan and prepare for an Active Shooter incident
  • How best to communicate and develop effective liaison with internal and external stakeholders, law enforcement agencies and other first responders
  • Come away with best practices for conducting Active Shooter response training for employees and recognizing signs of potential workplace violence

Intended Audience

  • Community leaders and citizens
  • Education (all levels K-12, Colleges and Universities)
  • Healthcare
  • Human Resources Professionals
  • Manufacturing and Industrial
  • Government
  • Security and Risk Professionals
  • Law Enforcement
  • Business leaders and managers
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The APUS Center for Applied Learning (CAL) provides a wide-range of online and hybrid training and educational solutions for corporations, associations, governmental entities, individuals, and key groups in strategic markets to help them attain their workforce development and performance goals.
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On-Demand Webinar

Webinar – Healthcare Insecurity: A Global Growth Impediment

Learn how to bolster a global workforce with the right combination of benefits and insurance coverage to eliminate uncertainty about their health care options.
By: | July 21, 2016 • 2 min read

Presenters

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Overview

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Webinar Sponsor

A recent survey of business executives found that approximately 73 percent of companies surveyed deploy five percent of their workforce overseas. Companies striving to grow in today’s global economy need to have the reach and resources to position key personnel around the world. But a threatening impediment to that growth is the issue of Healthcare Insecurity.

Healthcare Insecurity is the indecision that can result when an individual falls ill while abroad and doesn’t know where to turn for treatment. Frequently, clinically unnecessary evacuation and unnecessarily expensive treatment can result, with sub-optimal patient outcomes becoming a risk.

Adding to the detrimental effects of Healthcare Insecurity is the increasing amount of political risk, not to mention terrorist activity that is compounding the stress levels of employees stationed overseas.

This one-hour webinar will delve into the topic of Healthcare Insecurity and tap expert resources to give companies guidance on, among other things:

  • How to provide on-the-ground support to globally-mobile expatriates that increase their sense of security and encourage them to utilize local health care options.
  • Developing a global program that provides employees with timely updates on issues that could impact their health and well-being, including political instability, pandemics, or terror threats.
  • Determining whether a streamlined approach to vendor services for overseas employees might be the right fit.
  • Finding the right mix of insurance coverages to both protect the company’s bottom line and provide for the health and welfare of overseas staff.

The Recording

Download a PDF slide deck of the presentation.




Dan Reynolds is editor-in-chief of Risk & Insurance. He can be reached at [email protected]
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Sponsored: Lexington Insurance

Handling Heavy Equipment Risk with Expertise

Large and complex risks require a sophisticated claims approach. Partner with an insurer who has the underwriting and claims expertise to handle such large claims.
By: | August 4, 2016 • 5 min read
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What happens to a construction project when a crane gets damaged?

Everything comes to a halt. Cranes are critical tools on the job site, and such heavy equipment is not quickly or easily replaceable. If one goes out of commission, it imperils the project’s timeline and potentially its budget.

Crane values can range from less than $1 million to more than $10 million. Insuring them is challenging not just because of their value, but because of the risks associated with transporting them to the job site.

“Cranes travel on a flatbed truck, and anything can happen on the road, so the exposure is very broad. This complicates coverage for cranes and other pieces of heavy equipment,” said Rich Clarke, Assistant Vice President, Marine Heavy Equipment, Lexington Insurance, a member of AIG.

On the jobsite, operator error is the most common cause of a loss. While employee training is the best way to minimize the risk, all the training in the world can’t prevent every accident.

“Simple mistakes like forgetting to put the outrigger down or setting the load capacity incorrectly can lead to a lot of damage,” Clarke said.

Crane losses can easily top $1 million in physical damage alone, not including the costs of lost business income.

“Many insurers are not comfortable covering a single piece of equipment valued over $1 million,” Clarke said.

A large and complex risk requires a sophisticated claims approach. Lexington Insurance, backed by the resources and capabilities of AIG, has the underwriting and claims expertise to handle such large claims.

SponsoredContent_Lex_0816“Cranes travel on a flatbed truck, and anything can happen on the road, so the exposure is very broad. This complicates coverage for cranes and other pieces of heavy equipment. Simple mistakes like forgetting to put the outrigger down or setting the load capacity incorrectly can lead to a lot of damage.”
— Rich Clarke, Assistant Vice President, Marine Heavy Equipment, Lexington Insurance

Flexibility in Underwriting and Claims

Treating insureds as partners in the policy-building and claims process helps to fine-tune coverage to fit the risk and gets all parties on the same page.

Internally, a close relationship between underwriting and claims teams facilitates that partnership and results in a smoother claims process for both insurer and insured.

“Our underwriters and claims examiners work together with the broker and insured to gain a better understanding of their risk and their coverage expectations before we even issue a policy,” said Michelle Sipple, Senior Vice President, Property, Lexington Insurance. “This helps us tailor our policies or claims handling to suit their needs.”

“The shared goals and commonality between underwriting and claims help us provide the most for our clients,” Clarke said.

Establishing familiarity and trust between client, claims, and underwriting helps to ensure that policy wording is clear and reflects the expectations of all parties — and that insureds know who to contact in the event of a loss.

Lexington’s claims and underwriting experts who specialize in heavy equipment will meet with a client before they buy coverage, during a claim, or any time in between. It is important for both claims and underwriting to have face time with insured so that everyone is working toward the same goals.

When there is a loss, designated adjusters stay in contact throughout the life of a claim.

Maintaining consistent communication not only meets a high standard of customer service, but also ensures speed and efficiency when a claim arises.

“We try to educate our clients from the get-go about what we will need from them after a loss, so we can initiate the claim and get the ball rolling right away,” Clarke said. “They are much more comfortable knowing who is helping them when they are trying to recover from a loss, and when it comes to heavy equipment, there’s no time to spare.”

SponsoredContent_Lex_0816“Our underwriters and claims examiners work together with the broker and insured to gain a better understanding of their risk and their coverage expectations before we even issue a policy. This helps us tailor our policies or claims handling to suit their needs.”
— Michelle Sipple, Senior Vice President, Property, Lexington Insurance

Leveraging Industry Expertise

When a claim occurs, independent adjusters and engineers arrive on the scene as quickly as possible to conduct physical inspections of damaged cranes, bringing years of experience and many industry relationships with them.

Lexington has three claims examiners specializing in cranes and heavy equipment. To accommodate time differences among clients’ sites, Lexington’s inland marine operations work out of two central locations on the East and West Coasts – Atlanta, Georgia and Portland, Oregon.

No matter the time zone, examiners can arrive on site quickly.

“Our clients know they need us out there immediately. They know our expertise,” Clarke said. “Our examiners are known as leaders in the industry.”

When a barge crane sustained damage while dismantling an old bridge in the San Francisco Bay that had been cracked by an earthquake, for example, “I got the call at 6 a.m. and we had experts on site by 12 p.m.,” Clarke said.SponsoredContent_Lex_0816

Auxiliary Services

In addition to educating insureds about the claims process and maintaining open lines of communication, Lexington further facilitates the process through AIG’s IntelliRisk® services – a suite of online tools to help policyholders understand their losses and track their claim’s progress.

“Brokers and clients can log in and see status of their claim and find information on their losses and reserves,” Sipple said.

In some situations, Lexington can also come to the rescue for clients in the form of advance payments. If a crane gets damaged, an examiner can conduct a quick inspection and provide a rough estimate of what the total value of the claim might be.

Lexington can then issue 50 percent of that estimate to the insured immediately to help them get moving on repairs or find a replacement. This helps to mitigate business interruption losses, as it normally takes a few weeks to determine the full and final value of the claim and disburse payment.

Again, the skill of the examiners in projecting accurate loss costs makes this possible.

“This is done on a case-by-case basis,” Clarke said. “There’s no guarantee, but if the circumstances are right, we will always try to get that advance payment out to our insureds to ease their financial burden.”

For project managers stymied by an out-of-service crane, these services help to bring halted work back up to speed.

For more information about Lexington’s inland marine services, interested brokers should visit http://www.lexingtoninsurance.com/home.

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This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with Lexington Insurance. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.Advertisement




Lexington Insurance Company, an AIG Company, is the leading U.S.-based surplus lines insurer.
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