Risk Management

Beaumont Vance Enterprise Risk Management Announces New Blog

Beaumont Vance, author of Enterprise Risk Management for Dummies and editor of Risk Management Reports is launching a new blog.
By: | May 24, 2015
Topics: Uncategorized

Beaumont Vance, author of ERM for Dummies and previous owner of RM Reports is beginning a new blog which will focus on quantifying uncertainty, and corporate risk management at the strategic level as well as any other topics that interest him.

Beaumont Vance, author of Enterprise Risk Management for Dummies and editor of Risk Management Reports is launching a new blog. This blog will focus on strategic level risk management for the board and C-suite level of decision making.

Themes will include applying new concepts to strategic risk management, e.g., decision science, complexity theory, econometrics, Big Data, modeling, Monte Carlo, Bayesian statistics and belief networks, systems dynamics and game theory.

Risk management is a field that requires a multidisciplinary approach and beaumont, being a consummate polymath, is the ideal person to fuse together multiple disciplines into a single, elegant suite of solutions.

Beaumont Vance’s blog can be found at www.beaumontvance.com.

The R&I Editorial Team may be reached at [email protected]
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Risk Insider: Jason Beans

When Yelp Reviews Are Better Than Hospital Rating Systems

By: | May 12, 2015 • 2 min read
Jason Beans is the Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Rising Medical Solutions, a medical cost management firm. He has over 20 years of industry experience. He can be reached at [email protected]

There is widespread industry agreement that moving towards reimbursing quality versus quantity of care is an important means for controlling medical costs. But how do we define “quality?” And, how do we quantify “quality”?

A recent Health Affairs study illustrates the difficulty of those questions.

The study reviewed four popular hospital rating services (Consumer Reports, Leapfrog, Healthgrades, U.S. News & World Report), and the measures they used were so divergent that their rankings became strikingly different:

  • Not one hospital received high marks from all services.
  • Only 10 percent of the hospitals rated highly by one service also received top marks from another.
  • Twenty-seven hospitals were simultaneously rated among the nation’s best and worst by different services.

We deal with this frequently in our networks. We’ll have one client “absolutely” refuse to work with a provider, while another “absolutely” demands that same provider in their network.

Why such amazing disparity? It’s apparent that both hospital rating services and our clients utilize different factors to measure quality, and weigh those factors differently.

One scoring system may value cost per episode, while another values cost per diem. Another system might reward great valet parking, while another focuses on infection rates. Even slight variances can massively impact ratings. At this point, a Yelp review is likely just as good … or better.

So how do we get to meaningful provider ratings? It’s clearly a pervasive problem. In Rising’s 2014 Workers’ Compensation Benchmarking Study, medical management ranked as the top core competency impacting claim outcomes, yet only 29 percent of respondents rate their medical providers. As demonstrated by the Health Affairs study, it’s really hard to delineate the best from the worst, and trying to make those determinations can cause organizational paralysis.

So, I recommend starting simple. First evaluate what outcomes are most important. Do you value customer experience, clinical, or financial outcomes and to what degree?  Do you weigh factors differently by service type (e.g., MRIs weigh convenience highly; surgeries weigh clinical outcomes highly)? If your measurements don’t correlate with your goals, your process won’t produce valuable results.

Even slight variances can massively impact ratings. At this point, a Yelp review is likely just as good … or better.

After determining your most important factors, then your second step is to carve providers from the bottom.  This avoids the inertia that can come from trying to rate “top” providers too soon. It’s much easier to eliminate the outlier providers that cause the majority of bad outcomes to instantly improve your program.

Only after these steps would I recommend trying to establish the “best” providers. The “best” often deal with the most difficult cases, with the longest recovery periods or possibly the “worst outcomes.” It’s easy to see how a gifted surgeon might suffer under many quality rating systems. On a positive note, the transition to ICD-10 will allow provider quality comparisons at a deeper level of specificity never possible with ICD-9. In other words, we’ll actually be able to compare apples to apples over time.

With this three-step iterative approach, you can create and refine measurements that bring real, long-term value to your organization…making your system better than Yelp.

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Sponsored Content by AIG

Preparing for and Navigating the Claims Process

Be clear on what your organization's policy does and does not cover before you need it.
By: | July 1, 2015 • 5 min read
SponsoredContent_AIG

All of a sudden – it happens.  The huge explosion in the plant.  The executive scandal that leads the evening news.  The discovery that one of your company’s leading products has led to multiple consumer deaths due to a previously undiscovered fault in its design.  Your business and its reputation, along with your own, are on the line.  You had hoped this day would never come, but it’s time to file a major claim.

Is your company ready?  Do you know – for certain – how you would proceed, both internally with your own employees, and externally, with your insurance provider?  What data will you need to provide, and how quickly can you pull it together?  Do you know – and understand – the exacting wording of your policy?  Are you sure you are covered for this type of incident?  And even if you are a multinational with a global policy, how old is it, and is your coverage in concert with any recent changes in the laws of the country and local jurisdiction in which the incident occurred?

As should be clear from these few questions, if you organization is hit with a major event and you need to make a claim, just knowing that you are current with your premium payments is not enough.  Preparation before the event ever occurs, strong relationships with your insurance team, and a thorough understanding of what needs to happen throughout the claims process are all essential to reaching a satisfactory claim settlement quickly, so that a long business disruption and further damage are avoided.

Get Ready before Disaster Strikes

SponsoredContent_AIGThe Boy Scout motto, “Be prepared,” applies equally well to organizations that may suddenly be faced with the need to navigate the complexities of the claim process – especially for large claims following a major crisis.  Crises are by nature emotional events.  Taking the following steps ahead of time, before disaster strikes, will help avoid the sense of paralysis and tunnel vision that often follows in their wake.

Open up a dialogue with your insurer – today.

For risk managers and others who will be called upon to interface with your insurer in the event of a crisis, establishing open and honest lines of communication now will save trouble and time in the claims process.  Regular communication with your insurance team and keeping them up to date on recent developments in your organization, business and manufacturing processes, etc., will provide them with a better understanding of your risk profile and make it easier to explain what has happened, and why, in the event you ever have to file.  It will also help in the process of updating and refining the wording in existing policies to reflect important changes that may impact a future claim.

Conduct pre-loss workshops to stress-test your readiness to handle a major loss.

Firefighters conduct frequent drills to ensure their teams know what to do when confronted with different types of emergencies.  Commercial airline pilots do the same.  Your organization should be no different.  Thinking through potential loss scenarios and conducting workshops around them will help you identify where the gaps are – in personnel, reporting structures, contact lists, data maintenance, etc., before a real crisis occurs.  If at all possible, you should include your insurance team and broker (if you have one) in these workshops.  This will not only help cement important relationships, but it will also serve to further educate them about your organization and on what you will need from them in a crisis; and vice versa.  The value to your organization can be significant, because your risk management team will not be starting from zero when you have to make a claim.  Knowing what to do first, whom to call at your insurer, what data they will need to begin the claims process, etc. – all of this will save time and help get you on the road to a settlement much more quickly.

Know what your policy covers, before you need it.

SponsoredContent_AIGThis advice may sound obvious, but experience has shown that all too often, companies are not aware, in detail, of what their policies cover and don’t cover.  As Noona Barlow, AIG head of financial lines claims Europe has noted, particularly in the case of small to mid-size organizations, “it is amazing how often directors and risk managers don’t actually know what their policy covers them for.”   This can have dire consequences.  In the case of D & O insurance, for example, even a “global” policy many not cover all situations, because in some countries, companies are not allowed to indemnify their directors.  Obviously, these kinds of facts are important to know before rather than after an incident occurs.  So it is important to have an insurer with both a broad and deep understanding of local laws and regulations wherever you have exposure, in addition to an understanding of the technical details of working through the claims process.

Make sure your data management policies are in order.

Successful risk management depends on having consistent, high-quality data on all of your risk-sensitive operations (manufacturing, procurement, shipping, etc.), so that you can quantify where the greatest risks sit in the organization and take steps to reduce them.  Good data, complemented by strong analytics, will also help you to identify potential problems before they occur.  It will also help you to maximize the effectiveness of your insurance purchasing decisions.  Frequent, detailed conversations with your insurer will help you to identify any areas where additional data might be needed in the event of a crisis.

No one ever wants to find themselves in the midst of a crisis.  But if and when such an event does strike, if you have taken the steps above you will be much better positioned to work through the claims process – and reach an effective resolution – as quickly and as smoothly as possible.

For more information, please visit the AIG Knowledge and Insights Center.

This article was produced by AIG and not the Risk & Insurance® editorial team.



AIG is a leading international insurance organization serving customers in more than 100 countries.
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