Risk Insider: Patty Hostine

What Is ‘Off Work’?

By: | May 26, 2015 • 3 min read
Patricia Hostine, MA, MBA, LPC, CRC, MSCC, CWCP, has more than 20 years’ experience in workers’ compensation from both the vendor and corporate perspectives. She is the Director of US Disability Management for The Flex N Gate Group of Companies. She can be reached at phostine@FLEXNGATE-MI.com.

Last week, I sat through a lovely presentation on FMLA processing. At one point, it was from the occupational health clinic perspective, which stated that stay at work and return to work are the first priority.

I was thinking, “Great, we’re all on the same page!” Then I realized that it was the same clinic we use. From experience, I know that’s not their past practice.

My first thought was “Why does an occupational health clinic even have a box that says ‘off work’ on the return to work slip?”

I’m a firm believer in the premise that we all have a part to play in the average workers’ compensation claim. The employee reports the injury and makes every effort toward recovery.

The employer files the claim and manages the employment relationship. The adjuster decides if the injury or accident is compensable under that specific jurisdiction with the facts as reported. Lastly, the clinic and doctors provide evaluation and treatment to get the employee to maximum medical improvement (MMI).

The hope is always that MMI is their pre-injury status, in all ways —medically, financially and emotionally the same as before the incident. This becomes difficult in the face of an ‘off work’ slip, which happens more often than it should.

This got me thinking about the nature of ‘work’ and how it impacts the employee’s ability to return to full function. The employees I’ve worked with have very specific tasks associated with their work, usually outlined by detailed work instructions. (Thank you, Quality!)

So when we get an ‘off work’ we are both surprised and dismayed. The employee now has a more difficult return to work process due to the financial burden of not being paid for the waiting period, a reduced salary and perhaps some discouragement about continuing to work for the employer. Making matters worse, the ‘off work’ slip gives no direction for what the employee should be doing to recover.

My first thought was “Why does an occupational health clinic even have a box that says ‘off work’ on the return to work slip?”

The employee goes home to heal or get treatment or use narcotics (that always keeps them off work).

What do employees do while ‘off work’? I have seen some video of employees that are not ‘working’ and they seem to perform all normal life activities. As a vocational counselor, I know that most tasks we do in everyday life are also things that other people do as an occupation.

For example, cook, fast food (DOT 313.374-010), chauffer, domestic service (DOT 359.673.010), maid (DOT 323.687-014) or laundry, domestic (DOT 302.685-010). By the way, I have just described my holiday weekend for you. I was not working but I did every one of those jobs in rotation.

It seems the only difference between work and activities of daily life is the pay. I conclude that ‘off work’ means ‘cannot do anything for pay.’

That limitation does not promote stay at work/return to work for anyone. If we can just convince doctors that ‘off work’ is a limitation that neither promotes recovery nor describes what the employee does while not working, we will all be better off.

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NWC&DC Update

Practical Solutions for a Changing Claims Environment

The agenda for the National Workers’ Compensation and Disability Conference® & Expo will focus on proven solutions for claims challenges.
By: | May 21, 2015 • 3 min read
NWCDC 2014

Many theories are emerging on the future of workers’ compensation in a rapidly changing world, but the National Workers’ Compensation and Disability Conference® & Expo built our upcoming 2015 session program mostly by focusing on existing solutions for claims payers’ current challenges.

WCconf_24thAnnualYet now that building the program for the 24th annual conference scheduled for November 11-13 at Mandalay Bay in Las Vegas is complete, I can also report that the lineup of 32 breakout sessions will include some forward-looking discussions.

Attendees will mostly find practical breakout-session presentations on topics like The Home Depot’s strategy for deploying nurse case managers, Southwest Airlines’ quality-assurance efforts for selecting vendor partners, and how employer Reyes Holdings applied an integrated disability and absence management approach.

Our selection group helped pick speakers often by favoring presentation proposals containing pragmatic solutions to the problems they and their industry colleagues face or see as emerging issues needing greater clarity.

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The selection group included Denise Algire, director, managed care & disability corporate risk, Safeway Inc.; Bill Wainscott, manager workers’ compensation & occupational health, International Paper; Dan Reynolds, editor-in-chief, Risk & Insurance; and myself.

Like the rest of society, though, workers’ comp is seeing many technology-driven changes and more lie ahead, of course. That is driving thought-provoking, insurance industry discussions on topics such as how the future face of employment and increased use of robotics will impact underwriters.

Those are important considerations. But there remains a need to help workers’ comp professionals understand current applications for technology the industry is still coming to grips with, like the application of predictive analytics.

That is why the National Workers’ Compensation and Disability Conference® & Expo will provide sessions like one to be led by ESIS, explaining the industry’s data analytics and predictive modeling capabilities. The presentation will be backed by Georgia Pacific explaining of how it has actually applied the tools to improve claims results.

We did not, however, ignore discussions on emerging changes.

Sedgwick Claims Management Services Inc. and Harbor Health Systems, for example, will discuss evolving medical management topics such “accountable care, value-based pricing and patient engagement.” But with an eye to the practical, the session will also include a senior workers’ comp manager from Boeing sharing how the company’s current practices align with the expected shifts in healthcare delivery.

Our breakout sessions also look to enlighten on controversial topics impacting the workers’ comp industry. Attendees will have the opportunity to hear two opposing views on the movement pushing for more states to allow employers to opt out of their traditional workers’ comp systems as is currently allowed in Texas and Oklahoma.

The full conference agenda will be available online June 22.

But here is a sneak peak at what the agenda will include:

    • Walmart and PRIUM sharing the retailer’s efforts to manage pharmaceutical misuse
    • Pacific Gas and Electric’s adoption of a 24/7 telephonic injury management program
    • LifeTEAM Health and a Kaiser Permanente medical director describing the results from helping injured employees overcome psychosocial risks with a biopsychosocial strategy
    • A discussion on workplace violence, causation, mental trauma and prevention
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  • Explanations of strategies and available tools for administering the Americans with Disabilities Act and leave laws such as the Family Medical Leave Act.
  • A Hyatt Hotels senior occupational health manager on practices for injury prevention, early intervention, and claim-severity mitigation.

It’s an agenda built with an aim to meet the needs of a cross section of workers comp and disability management professionals, including medical providers, attorneys, claims managers and risk management department leaders.

Roberto Ceniceros is senior editor at Risk & Insurance® and chair of the National Workers' Compensation and Disability Conference® & Expo. He can be reached at rceniceros@lrp.com. Read more of his columns and features.
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Sponsored: Liberty International Underwriters

Making the Marine Industry SAFE

A new initiative to help marine clients address safety risks leverages a customized, expertised approach.
By: | May 8, 2015 • 5 min read
SponsoredContent_LIU

When it comes to marine based businesses there is no one-size-fits-all safety approach. The challenges faced by operators are much more complex than land based businesses.

The most successful marine operators understand that success is dependent on developing custom safety programs and then continually monitoring, training and adapting.

After all, it’s not just dollars at stake but the lives of dedicated crew and employees.

The LIU SAFE Program: Flexible, Pragmatic and Results Driven

Given these high stakes, LIU Marine is launching a new initiative to help clients proactively identify and address potential safety risks. The LIU SAFE Program is offered to clients as a value added service.

Richard Falcinelli, vice president, LIU Marine Risk Engineering

Richard Falcinelli, vice president, LIU Marine Risk Engineering

“The LIU SAFE program goes beyond traditional loss control. Using specialized risk assessment tools, our risk engineers function as consultants who gather and analyze information to identify potential opportunities for improvement. We then make recommendations customized for the client’s business but that also leverage our knowledge of industry best practices,” said Richard Falcinelli, vice president, LIU Marine Risk Engineering.

It’s the combination of deep expertise, extensive industry knowledge and a global perspective that enables LIU Marine to uniquely address their client’s safety challenges. Long experience has shown the LIU Risk Engineering team that a rigid process will not be successful. The wide variety of operations and safety challenges faced by marine companies simply cannot be addressed with a one-size-fits-all approach.

Therefore, the LIU SAFE program is defined by five core principles that form the basis of each project.

“Our underwriters, risk engineers and claims professionals leverage their years spent as master mariners, surveyors and attorneys to utilize the best project approach to address each client’s unique challenges,” said Falcinelli.

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The LIU SAFE Program in Action

When your primary business is transporting dry and liquid bulk cargo throughout the nation’s complex inland river system, safety is always a top concern.

The risks to crew, vessels and cargo are myriad and constantly changing due to weather, water conditions and many other factors.

SCF Marine, a St. Louis-based inland river tug and barge transportation company and part of the Inland River Services business unit of SEACOR Holdings Inc., understands what it takes to operate successfully in these conditions. The company strives for a zero incident operating environment and invests significant time and money in pursuit of that goal.

SponsoredContent_LIUBut when it comes to marine safety, all experienced mariners know that no one person or company has all the answers. So in an effort to continually find ways to improve, SCF management approached McGriff, Seibels & Williams, its marine broker, to see if LIU Marine would be willing to provide their input through an operational review and risk assessment.

The goal of the engagement was clear: SCF wanted to confirm that it was getting the best return possible on its significant investment in safety management.

Using the LIU SAFE framework, LIU’s Risk Engineers began by sending SCF a detailed document request. The requested information covered many aspects of the SCF operation, including recruiting and hiring practices, navigation standards, watch standing procedures, vessel maintenance standards and more.

Following several weeks of document review the LIU team drafted its preliminary report. Next, LIU organized a collaborative meeting at SCF’s headquarters with all of the latter’s senior staff, along with McGriff brokers and LIU underwriters. Each SCF manager gave an overview of their area of responsibility and LIU’s preliminary findings were reviewed in depth. The day ended with a site visit and vessel tour.

“We sent our follow-up report after the meeting and McGriff let us know that it was well received by SCF,” Falcinelli said. “SCF is so focused on safety; we are confident that they will use the information gained from this exercise to further benefit their employees and stakeholders.”

“It was probably one of the most comprehensive efforts that I’ve ever seen undertaken by a carrier’s loss control team,” said Baxter Southern, executive vice president at McGriff, which also is based in St. Louis. “Through the collaborative efforts of all three parties, it was determined that SCF had the right approach and implementation. The process generated some excellent new concepts for implementation as the company grows.”

In addition to the benefits of these new concepts, LIU gained a much deeper understanding of SCF’s operations and is better positioned to provide ongoing loss control support.

“Effective safety management is about being focused and continuously improving, which requires complete commitment from top management,” Falcinelli added. “SCF obviously is on a quest for safety excellence with zero incidents as the goal, and has passed that philosophy down to its entire workforce.”

“SCF’s commitment to the process along with LIU’s expertise was certainly impressive and a key reason for the successful outcome,” Southern concluded.

There are many other ways that the SAFE program can help clients address safety risks. To learn more about how your company could benefit, contact your broker or LIU Marine.

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This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with Liberty International Underwriters. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.




LIU is part of the Global Specialty Division of Liberty Mutual Insurance.
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