Wellness Strategies

BOOCS Program Could Lower Obesity-Related Injury Risk

A Japanese model of health education among workers may hold promise for an alternative to traditional methods to help improve the well-being of the workforce.
By: | February 23, 2015 • 5 min read
R11-13p66-67_18Obese.indd

Employers seeking to improve their employees’ health and reduce illnesses and injuries may want to look to a Japanese model. By instituting a unique health education program started in that country, health risks among obese workers were significantly reduced — up to 15 years later.

The program used a new method of health education among workers in the 1990s. A follow-up study published recently in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine may hold promise for an alternative to traditional methods to help improve the well-being of the workforce.

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“The results indicate a mortality benefit by participation in [the Brain-Oriented Obesity Control System] program,” the study said. “For prevention of metabolic syndrome, effective measures are strongly needed in the future, and it is suggested that [the] BOOCS program will contribute to them as a new approach for health promotion.”

The follow-up study results were released as the prevalence of obese workers continues to increase. According to the study, the increase amounts to “25.1 percent for males and 23.9 percent for females in the United States as a body mass index of 30 or higher in 2003 to 2009, and 28.5 percent for males and 11.6 percent for females in Japan as a BMI of 25 or higher in 2011.”

Along with the increase in BMI is a higher risk of metabolic syndrome, which increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, especially heart failure, as well as diabetes. Metabolic syndrome is defined as a disorder of energy utilization and storage, diagnosed by a co-occurrence of three out of five conditions, including abdominal obesity, elevated blood pressure, elevated fasting plasma glucose, high serum triglycerides, and low high-density cholesterol levels.

“Hazard ratios were calculated with survival curves drawn to evaluate the mortality effects by the program participation,” according to the report. “The results support a protective effect on mortality by participating in [the] BOOCS program.”

BOOCS

Traditional approaches to behavior modification typically begin with prohibitions against unhealthy behaviors such as eating high-caloric foods, drinking alcohol, and smoking. Because of its strictness, this method “frequently results in the rebound of body weight and the appearance of [a] guilty conscience,” the report said.

BOOCS “begins with no prohibition,” the report said. It “is a unique method prioritizing the recovery from fatigue, in particular, ‘brain fatigue,’ and it eventually induces better lifestyle modification and improvement of body weight and serum lipids.”

The program includes two principles and three rules as a basis for “effective and active guidance.” The principles are “do not prohibit or order yourself as possible” and “do something pleasant for yourself.” The rules include:

  • Do not practice what you dislike even if it is good for your health.
  • Do not prohibit what you like even if it is bad for your health.
  • Do only what you like among good things and matters for your health.

The Japanese inventor of the program has said the approach “is quite useful for making the participants fully aware of the fundamentals of health promotion and disease prevention, which leads them to modify their health behavior,” according to the study. “He also insists that prohibitive and compulsive instructions are ineffective for behavior modification, and, in particular, those people who understand [the] significance of health would result in failure through such methods and fall into vicious circle such as rebounding body weight.”

The authors do not speculate on why the program works and say more research is needed. However, they point to the study results as proof that it is effective.

The Study

Public service employees working for a municipal government in Japan were introduced to a health service organization in 1992, which included health exams, seminars and guidance, and insurance programs. The BOOCS portion of the service included 10 one-day and two-day seminars annually with lectures on health care by physicians and practical exercises by professionals such as a physical instructor, a dietician, and a psychologist.

The initial study and 15-year follow-up research into an obesity program among Japanese workers included three groups. Workers who participated in the Brain-Oriented Obesity Control System were called the intervention subjects. Among the nonparticipants, comparative obese controls were those who had a body mass index of at least 25 or health problems related to obesity while reference subjects were the remainder. In the follow-up study 15 years later, the researchers identified participants who were deceased and their causes of death.

“Compared with comparative obese controls, hazard ratios for all causes were significantly lower in participants [of the BOOCS program] at 0.54,” the report said. “The “significant mortality changes” persisted during the follow-up period. “One of the reasons for such preventive effects of [the] BOOCS program may be related to improvement of obesity during follow-up.”

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The authors noted that among male participants in the BOOCS program, BMIs decreased in the first five years of the study by 1 percent to 5 percent compared to both groups of nonparticipants. “These data coincide with the previous reports that both all-cause and cancer mortality were associated with obesity,” the report said. “These effects brought by [the] BOOCS program may result in the protective effect for mortality in this study.”

The results were not seen to the same extent among females. The authors speculated that it could be due to sociological factors, saying traditional gender roles remain and many women leave the workforce upon marriage or childbirth.

In conclusion, “the standardized mortality rates for all causes and all neoplasms in comparison with the general population were statistically lower among participants [in the BOOCS program] and reference subjects, which may be due to the healthy worker effect,” the study said.

Nancy Grover is the president of NMG Consulting and the Editor of Workers' Compensation Report, a publication of our parent company, LRP Publications. She can be reached at riskletters@lrp.com.
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Workers' comp Trends

Tenn. Opt-Out Bill Draws From Existing Alternatives

Supporters say Tennessee's proposed Employee Injury Benefit Alternative could save employers up to 50 percent on their workers' comp costs.
By: | February 23, 2015 • 2 min read
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Calling it a free market alternative that could save employers up to 50 percent on their workers’ comp costs, lawmakers in Tennessee introduced legislation allowing an opt-out provision. If passed, Tennessee would join Oklahoma and Texas as the only states that would not require employers to adhere to the traditional workers’ comp system.

Called the Employee Injury Benefit Alternative, the Tennessee option combines aspects of both the Oklahoma and Texas laws. Similar to Oklahoma’s law, S.B. 721 would require employers who choose to opt out to be designated “qualified employers” and provide a set of benefits. However, as with the Texas system, employees would still be able to sue their employers if they can prove negligence. Damages for such a suit could range up to $1 million per employee and $5 million per occurrence.

“The core focus of the Tennessee option is to help injured employees get back to work faster,” said state Sen. Mark Green. “Making that happen requires good benefits, strong communication, and will lead to higher employee satisfaction.”

Green, a physician and vice chair of the Senate Commerce and Labor Committee, sponsored the legislation in that chamber. House Majority Whip Jeremy Durham introduced the measure there.

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Employers could become qualified and eligible to opt out of the system by applying to the commissioner of commerce and insurance, paying an annual $500 fee, agreeing to establish a written benefit plan, notifying each covered employee, and providing proof of financial ability to cover its employees’ injuries.

The benefit plan must include the following minimum amounts:

  • Medical expenses for at least 156 weeks and $300,000 per employee.
  • Temporary total disability benefits starting on the fourth day of disability of at least 70 percent of the employee’s average weekly wages, up to 110 percent of the state AWW, for at least 156 weeks.
  • Death and scheduled dismemberment benefits up to $300,000 per employee.

The plan could have a combined single limit for all benefits payable due to an occupational injury if the limit is at least $750,000 per employee and $2 million per occurrence. Injuries that occur while the employee was intoxicated or under the influence of drugs would not need to be covered.

Supporters said key to the Tennessee option are employee accountability, medical management, employee-employer engagement, and free market competition, according to a statement released by the Association of Responsible Alternatives to Workers’ Compensation. Rather than replacing workers’ comp, it will put competitive pressure on the system for better outcomes for employees and employers.

Labor representatives were reviewing the legislation and planned to speak with the bill’s sponsors. A.J. Starling, secretary-treasurer of the Tennessee AFL-CIO, said the state recently went through a “two year ordeal” changing Tennessee to an administrative workers’ comp adjudication system from a combination court and administrative process.

“On the surface, I’m skeptical,” Starling said of the opt-out bill. “Our main concern is making sure the injured worker is covered.”

Nancy Grover is the president of NMG Consulting and the Editor of Workers' Compensation Report, a publication of our parent company, LRP Publications. She can be reached at riskletters@lrp.com.
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Sponsored: Lexington Insurance

What Is Insurance Innovation?

When it comes to E&S insurance, innovation is best defined as equal parts creativity and speed.
By: | February 19, 2015 • 4 min read

SponsoredContent_LexingtonTruly innovative insurance solutions are delivered in real time, as the needs of businesses change and the nature of risk evolves.

Lexington Insurance exemplifies this approach to innovation. Creative products driven by speed to market are at the core of the insurer’s culture, reputation and strategic direction, according to Matthew Power, executive vice president and head of strategic development at Lexington, an AIG Company and the leading U.S.-based surplus lines insurer.

“The excess and surplus lines sector is in a growth mode due, in no small part, to the speed at which our insureds’ underlying business models are changing,” Power said. “Tomorrow’s winning companies are those being built upon true breakthrough innovation, with a strong focus on agility and speed to market.”

To boost its innovation potential, for example, Lexington has launched a new crowdsourcing strategy. The company’s “Innovation Boot Camps” bring people together from the U.S., Canada, Bermuda and London in a series of engagements focused on identifying potential waves of change and market needs on the coverage horizon.

“Employees work in teams to determine how insurance can play a vital role in increasing the success odds of new markets and customers,” Power said. “That means anticipating needs and quickly delivering programs to meet them.”

An example: Working in tandem with the AIG Science team – another collaboration focused on innovation – Lexington is looking to offer an advanced high-tech seating system in the truck cabs of some of its long-haul trucking customers. The goal is to reduce driver injury and fatigue-based accidents.

SponsoredContent_Lexington“Our professionals serving the healthcare market average more than twenty years of industry experience. That includes attorneys and clinicians combining in a defense-oriented claims approach and collaborating with insureds in this fast-moving market segment. At Lexington, our relentless focus on innovation enables us to take on the risk so our clients can take on the opportunities.”
— Matthew Power, Executive Vice President and Head of Regional Development, Lexington Insurance Company

Power explained that exciting growth areas such as robotics, nanotechnology and driverless cars, among others, require highly customized commercial insurance solutions that often can be delivered only by excess and surplus lines underwriters.

“Being non-admitted, our freedom of rate and form allows us to be nimble, and that’s very important to our clients,” he said. “We have an established track record of reacting quickly to trends and market needs.”

Lexington is a leading provider of personal lines coverage for the excess and surplus lines industry and, as Power explains, the company’s suite of product offerings has continued to evolve in the wake of changing customer needs. “Our personal lines team has developed a robust product offering that considers issues like sustainable building, energy efficiency, and cyber liability.”

Most recently the company launched Evacuation Response, a specialty coverage designed to reimburse Lexington personal lines customers for costs associated with government mandated evacuations. “These evacuation scenarios have becoming increasingly commonplace in the wake of recent extreme weather events, and this coverage protects insured families against the associated costs of transportation and temporary housing.

The company also has followed the emerging cap and trade legislation in California, which has created an active carbon trading market throughout the state. “Our new Carbon ODS product provides real property protection for sequestered ozone depleting substances, while our CarbonCover Design Confirm product insures those engineering firms actively verifying and valuing active trades.” Lexington has also begun to insure new Carbon Registries as they are established in markets across the country.

Lexington has also developed a number of new product offerings within the Healthcare space. The Affordable Care Act has brought an increased focus on the continuum of care and clinical patient safety. In response, Lexington has created special programs for a wide range of entities, as the fast-changing healthcare industry includes a range of specialized services, including home healthcare, imaging centers (X-ray, MRI, PET–CT scans), EMT/ambulances, medical laboratories, outpatient primary care/urgent care centers, ambulatory surgery centers and Medical rehabilitation facilities.

“The excess and surplus lines sector is in growth mode due, in no small part, to the speed at which our insureds’ underlying business models are changing,” Power said.

Apart from its coverage flexibility, Lexington offers this segment monthly webcasts, bi-monthly conference calls and newsletters on key risk issues and educational topics. It also provides on-site risk consultation (for qualifying accounts), access to RiskTool, Lexington’s web-based healthcare risk management and patient safety resource, and a technical staff consisting of more than 60 members dedicated solely to healthcare-related claims.

“Our professionals serving the healthcare market average more than twenty years of industry experience,” Power said. “That includes attorneys and clinicians combining in a defense-oriented claims approach and collaborating with insureds in this fast-moving market segment.”

Power concluded, “At Lexington, our relentless focus on innovation enables us to take on the risk so our clients can take on the opportunities.”
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This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with Lexington Insurance. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.




Lexington Insurance Company, an AIG Company, is the leading U.S.-based surplus lines insurer.
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