Column: Workers' Comp

The Case for Exoskeletons

By: | October 15, 2016 • 2 min read
Roberto Ceniceros is senior editor at Risk & Insurance® and chair of the National Workers' Compensation and Disability Conference® & Expo. He can be reached at [email protected] Read more of his columns and features.

I hope more workers’ compensation insurers seriously evaluate paying for exoskeletons that allow patients with certain spinal cord injuries to rise from their wheelchairs and walk.

Exoskeletons are assistive devices often described as “wearable robots” or “Segways with legs.” Since 2014, the Food and Drug Administration has approved two models for personal use, including one earlier this year.

Some workers’ comp insurers have already approved a few claims for the motorized devices and the cost of training. Other underwriters have declined to fund them.

The battery-powered devices cost at least $80,000 plus additional training. Safety questions remain and some doctors who agree on the medical benefits they provide are still wary of certifying them as “medically necessary.”

But the products are among technological advancements in patient care — like increasingly sophisticated prosthesis — that payers should learn about to adequately weigh the exoskeleton’s price tag against potential medical care and medication expense reductions resulting from their benefits.

“Psychological benefits also result from standing, walking and looking others eye to eye. Well-being impacts claims expense.” – Clare Hartigan, physical therapist, exoskeleton clinical trail leader at Shepherd Center

Attendees at the National Workers’ Compensation and Disability Conference® & Expo in New Orleans can watch an injured worker’s exoskeleton demonstration during a session titled “The Bionic Claimant: Emerging Medical Technology’s Impact on Care and Cost.”

Clare Hartigan, a physical therapist who will speak during the session, has led clinical trials on exoskeletons at the Shepherd Center, a rehab hospital in Atlanta. She will be joined by Mark Sidney, VP of claims at Midwest Employers Casualty Co.


Exoskeletons’ well-documented medical benefits for spinal injury patients include improved bowel and bladder function, weight loss and better glucose test results, Hartigan said.

“Psychological benefits also result from standing, walking and looking others eye to eye,” Hartigan said. “Well-being impacts claims expense.”

Apart from clinical uses and workers’ comp, other exoskeleton applications are emerging. The military is testing robotic-like suits that could help soldiers carry more weight and reach the battleground less fatigued.

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health expects rapid growth in industrial wearable exoskeleton suits that can help workers lift greater loads or hold up heavier tools for longer periods.

But it would also be great to see more workers who have lost their mobility in workplace accidents benefit from the health and quality-of-life improvements exoskeletons offer. Perhaps that will come as more insurers learn about exoskeletons and begin evaluating their unit costs against their impact on medical expenses.

We can also hope for decreases in exoskeletons’ cost as commonly occurs with most technology products. But the companies offering them will need to recoup their R&D expenses. &

Share this article:

Employment Practices

Distress Signals

There are a growing number of resources available to address employee mental health issues.
By: | October 15, 2016 • 5 min read

What happens when an employee starts exhibiting signs of mental illness after they’re hired? It can be difficult for organizations to balance the need to reasonably accommodate mentally ill people with productivity needs and fears of potential violence.

But the amount of resources available to help employers support such workers is rising.


“Work is such an important influence on a person’s quality of life, including their financial well-being, that giving up a job is not an option,” said Debra Lerner, director of the Program on Health, Work and Productivity at Tufts Medical Center in Boston.

For many, the onset of mental health issues can make it difficult to perform a job, even one the person did well before becoming ill, Lerner said. For example, some people dealing with depression have trouble with memory or being organized.

Others may not sleep well, which can make it difficult for them to get to work on time or to “hit the ground running” after arriving.

“Staying on task, especially when interruptions occur, can be difficult,” Lerner said. “Interpersonal issues are common and interfere with relationships with customers, supervisors or co-workers.”

Employers can get recommendations from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s job accommodation network, which are tailored to the person’s illness and limitations as well as their job demands. Employers can also refer workers to resources such as Tufts’ Be Well at Work program to help people suffering from depression learn approaches to being effective on the job.

“One of the program’s benefits is a method for assessing which aspects of working are most difficult and intervening with specific suggestions for improving ability to function,” Lerner said.

Tom Parry, president, Integrated Benefits Institute

Tom Parry, president, Integrated Benefits Institute

Another resource is the Integrated Benefits Institute, a San Francisco-based research organization that aims to demonstrate the connection between improved health, well-being and business performance at companies, said Tom Parry, president.

“We take a very broad view of these issues, so that employers make proper investments in health and understand the much broader outcomes that are more important to their business than just health care costs,” Parry said.

Most employers have typically used medical and pharmaceutical claims data to identify key health conditions. But since behavioral issues tend to be underreported, they typically “don’t rise to the top,” Parry said.

IBI provides employers with information from third parties to find ways to identify issues and conditions, without violating privacy rules per the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. Alternatives include working with their employee assistance programs and conducting well-being surveys.


“One of the real challenges to improved behavioral health management is the stigma that goes along with those conditions, which has made it hard for employees to self-identify around those issues and seek help,” Parry said. “That’s changing, but it’s still a big part of the problem.”

Need Can Be Implied

Sometimes the employer must initiate the interactive process required by the Americans with Disabilities Act, said Carla O’Sullivan, education programs manager at Disability Management Employer Coalition.

“The employer always has to take the employee’s privacy into account, and they should not request information or ask inappropriate questions,” O’Sullivan said.

“But it is absolutely in the employer’s best interests to speak to the employee … particularly if the employee had been doing great but then all of a sudden they are not. It could be that the employee needs to be referred to an employee assistance program, or maybe it’s just a matter of being supportive.”

While the onus is typically on employees to request accommodations, they don’t have to actually use the words “reasonable accommodation” if the need is obvious, said Frank C. Morris, Jr., of Epstein Becker & Green P.C.

“For example, if an employee tells a supervisor that they need to go twice a week for medical treatment for the next six months, or requests time off for extended medical treatment, the EEOC and the courts will likely find this to be sufficient notice of an accommodation request,” Morris said.

One potential accommodation could be allowing employees time off to adjust to new medications or a new combination of medications, he said. But it should be for a reasonable and finite period of time until the problem can be controlled and for the employee to resume being productive at work.

Carla O’Sullivan, education programs manager, DMEC

Carla O’Sullivan, education programs manager, DMEC

Employers can ask workers for the medical opinion that demonstrates their disability, and then get a second opinion by their own medical professional, said J. Bradley Young, partner, Harris, Dowell, Fisher & Harris LC. Those professionals can help structure reasonable accommodations.

“For example, if the employee’s psychiatrist has prescribed the anti-psychotic Thorazine, that medication typically makes people sleep 20 hours a day — and it would not be reasonable to have the employer provide a bed to sleep on the job,” he said.

“However, a reasonable accommodation would be to have a different psychiatrist prescribe different medications instead of Thorazine that would not make the person too sleepy, allowing them to continue in their job.”

Outside Assistance

Employers do not have to accommodate people who are violent or make any threats of violent action, even if the employee has a mental disorder, Young said.

“They can be removed from the property and terminated,” he said. “But if an employee is simply acting erratically, that’s a completely different story.”

Employers can ask to have the person taken to a psychiatric hospital for evaluation, and if the employee is diagnosed with a mental disorder, the employer and employee have to work together to try to come to a mutually agreeable decision on a reasonable accommodation, Young said.

Some disability carriers have mental health consultants who can assist employers with proactive accommodations to help at-risk employees avoid a disability leave, or with return-to-work plans that can help an employee transition back to the workplace after taking a leave, said Brian Kost, director of the workplace possibilities program at The Standard, a disability insurer based in Portland, Ore.


For employers that have at-risk employees, mental health consultants can help ensure that employees are connected with resources — such as an EAP or wellness program — for assistance, Kost said.

“Above all, a consultant can help an employer and employee communicate better by keeping everyone involved up-to-date on an employee’s condition, his or her medical restrictions, when they may be returning to work and potential accommodations,” he said.

“This collaboration and communication can go a long way to ensure success.”

Katie Kuehner-Hebert is a freelance writer based in California. She has more than two decades of journalism experience and expertise in financial writing. She can be reached at [email protected]
Share this article:

Sponsored: Lexington Insurance

Sparking Innovation and Motivating Millennials

What started off as a one-off project for Lexington Insurance evolved into an annual program that sparks innovative solutions and helps develop millennial talent.
By: | October 3, 2016 • 5 min read

Two trends in the insurance industry, if they continue, could compromise its vitality in today’s fast-paced, technology-driven business world: slow innovation and a scarcity of millennial talent.

The quests to develop innovative solutions and services and to recruit young people to the field have raised concerns in the industry for several years, causing some insurers to think about how they will stay viable in the future when senior-level managers begin to retire.

But Lexington Insurance Company, a member of AIG, may have found a way to spark innovation that also engages millennial minds.

Innovation Boot Camp started three years ago as a one-off project meant to identify young, high-potential employees, give them exposure to senior management and evaluate their teamwork and leadership capabilities.

“The original concept was fairly straightforward. We would bring together a group of about 30 high potential employees for some semblance of team project work and it would allow management to gauge and assess talent,” said Matt Power, Executive Vice President, Head of Strategic Development, Lexington Insurance.

Little did he know how well the program would not only generate a plethora of innovative ideas that would drive the company forward, but also reinvigorate younger employees.

Lexington_SponsoredContent“The boot camps would be focused on innovation, with the idea that if we ended up with a concept or product that we could commercialize, then the boot camp would have been effectively self-funded. When they came back at the end of the 12 weeks, we were absolutely shocked because they produced about half a dozen products that have since been commercialized and are in some phase of being rolled out.”
— Matt Power, Executive Vice President, Head of Strategic Development, Lexington Insurance

New Ideas Emerge

The inaugural Innovation Boot Camp began with a two-day kick off meeting for participants— consisting of six teams with five or six participants. Each team was tasked with developing a business plan, and began to connect virtually over the next 12 weeks. The plan would culminate in a presentation to a senior management judging panel at the program’s conclusion.

“The boot camps would be focused on innovation, with the idea that if we ended up with a concept or product that we could commercialize, then the boot camp would have been effectively self-funded,” Power said. “When they came back at the end of the 12 weeks, we were absolutely shocked because they produced about half a dozen products that have since been commercialized and are in some phase of being rolled out.”

Power credits the program’s success in part to the participants’ youth. They were tuned in to different trends and issues than their more experienced counterparts.

Cyberbullying, for example, was a problem that didn’t exist for Power and his contemporaries as they grew up, but was salient for millennials. Based on the presentation of one group, Lexington developed coverage on their personalized portfolio for exposures associated with cyberbullying.

Likewise, “they educated us on the emergence of the craft brewing industry and how rapidly it was growing in the U.S.,” Power said. “That led to us launching a whole suite of products for craft brewers.”

Another team brought forth the concept of how rapid sequencing laser photography could be used to create a three-dimensional picture of a construction work site. That would allow contractors or claims managers to virtually walk through the site at a given point in the construction process to identify deviations from the original blueprint plans.

The images could memorialize the building process down to the millimeter, to every screw and wire. If a loss emerges later on due to a construction defect, the 3D map would be a valuable investigation tool.

Innovation Boot Camp proved so successful that Lexington expanded it to other arms of AIG all over the world.

“Suddenly we started getting calls from London, Copenhagen, Brazil,” Power said. “We were doing these programs for our global casualty team, for our lead attorneys in New York, for our financial lines group, and so on. We recently embarked on the 16th iteration of this program in London, with additional programs in the works.

“It’s a journey that has evolved from trying different things and not being afraid to fail, not being afraid to try new ways of thinking about the business.”


Engaging Millennial Minds

In addition to generating new product ideas, Innovation Boot Camp also engages younger employees more fully by offering the opportunity to make meaningful contributions to the company through independent work that requires some creative thinking.

Past participants are often great crusaders for the program.

“A program like IBC is something rarely seen at a large corporate conglomerate, and really a concept for new age startup companies,” said Alyson R. Jacobs, Vice President, Broker and Client Engagement Leader in AIG’s Energy & Construction Industry Segment. “But we were given a chance to work with people of all different professional backgrounds, and that environment unearthed concepts and solutions that have made a significant impact in the lives of our insureds and their employees.”

The chance to do work that makes a difference, both for the success of their company as well as the clients its serves, is what attracts millennial employees to the program and motivates them to devote their best effort to the project.

“Millennials want to be able to share their ideas and make meaningful contributions at work,” Power said. “Innovation Boot Camp has evolved into the perfect forum for that.”

David Kennedy, Esq., Product Development Manager for Lexington Insurance and former Coach for two Innovation Boot Camps, said the program engenders an “entrepreneurial spirit of developing something new, of applying analytical rigor to emerging risks to create unique and timely solutions for our clients and the marketplace.”

Exposure to senior executives doesn’t hurt either.

“It provided a platform for me to not just interact with our Senior Executive leadership but present a concept that could potentially be adopted by our company in the future,” said Ryan Pitterson, Assistant Vice President, AIG. “It helps to build your internal network, elevate your profile in the company and connects you with our client base as well.”

At a time when recent college graduates choose employers based on how much opportunity they’ll be given to have meaningful input — as well as opportunities for advancement — projects like Innovation Boot Camp could be the answer to the insurance industry’s struggle to pull in millennials.

“We give them the time, space and resources to create something new,” Power said. “When employee engagement is done right, it inspires passion and creativity.”

As multiple arms of AIG adopt Innovation Boot Camp around the globe, both the quantity and quality of new ideas are bound to flourish.

“The bottom line is, many heads are greater than one, and AIG has figured out how to leverage this. AIG hears their employees’ voices and enables those ideas to take our company into the future,” Jacobs said.

To learn more about Lexington Insurance, visit


This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with Lexington Insurance. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.

Lexington Insurance Company, an AIG Company, is the leading U.S.-based surplus lines insurer.
Share this article: