2016 NWCDC

Workers’ Compensation Conference Agenda Released

NWCDC's presentations offer leading-edge strategies from employers and other experts to mitigate workers' comp and disability challenges.
By: | August 15, 2016 • 3 min read
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Savvy employers have increasingly adopted injured-worker advocacy and engagement strategies to help employees overcome fears and challenges encountered when navigating workers’ compensation systems.

William Wainscott, manager, workers’ comp and occupational health, International Paper

William Wainscott, manager, workers’ comp and occupational health, International Paper

“The workers’ compensation claim process can be confusing and intimidating,” said William Wainscott, manager, workers’ comp and occupational health at International Paper.

“For the injured employee there are a lot of unknowns. An advocate helps alleviate the fears and guides them through all the issues.”

Wainscott will speak on an employer panel discussing injured-employee advocacy and engagement programs at the 25th Annual National Workers’ Compensation and Disability Management Conference® & Expo scheduled for Nov. 30 to Dec. 2 in New Orleans.

Minimizing a workplace injury’s impact on employees, their families and employers requires helping the injured worker access the right resources and understand their role in the recovery and return-to-work process, he said.

Wainscott is an NWCDC program co-chair and helped develop the conference’s 2016 agenda.

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The agenda highlights other planned presentations featuring employers discussing leading-edge strategies for mitigating workers’ comp and disability challenges.

“We have put together a really strong agenda with topics that are meaningful for employers and other payer groups like insurance companies and third-party administrators,” said Denise Algire, who is also an NWCDC program co-chair and director of managed care and disability corporate risk at Albertsons Cos.

Addressing mental health factors impacting the recovery of workers’ comp and disability claimants is another focus of conference sessions developed to help meet growing employer and claims payer interest in the topic.

“Mental illness affects both workers’ comp and non-occupational disability,” Algire said.

Historically, there has been tremendous stigma around the topic, but more employers now understand that mental health issues impact absenteeism and productivity.

“There is more emphasis on this as organizations realize that the No. 1 reason for short-term disability claims is either depression or some other mental illness,” Algire added.

“So talking about it and understanding what solutions and options are available for employees, and how to implement those programs within your organization is an important conversation.”

Algire will also speak as part of the NWCDC panel discussing injured-employee advocacy programs.

In addition to Algire and Wainscott, the panel will include Kimberly George, senior VP and senior healthcare advisor at Sedgwick Claims Management Services, and Scott Daniels, director of disability at Comcast.

Daniels will also speak as part of another panel titled “Mental Matters: How Mental Health Impacts Productivity and Performance.”

That is not the only conference presentation on mental health issues.

Tim East, director of risk management, The Walt Disney Company

Tim East, director of risk management, The Walt Disney Company

Donna Morrison, corporate healthcare director at UPS, will join Michael Lacroix, associate medical director of behavioral health at Aetna Life Insurance and Coventry Workers’ Comp Services, to deliver a presentation titled “Advances in Behavioral Health Disability Claims Management Strategies.”

In total, the conference features 31 breakout sessions, two general sessions, and a keynote address delivered by Tim East, director of corporate risk management at The Walt Disney Co.

During his presentation titled “Fueling Injury Recovery with Engaged Workers,” East will discuss how technology trends impact workers’ expectations for how employers engage them.

Worker engagement and solutions for mental health’s impact on claim duration are not the only topics awaiting NWCDC attendees.

Other sessions will offer strategies to address opioid prescribing, Medicare set-aside requirements, Americans with Disabilities Act mandates, and insurance arrangements.

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The conference will also present several case studies including:

  • A look at the multidisciplinary approach applied by manufacturer Mohawk Industries to launch a health and safety program.
  • The strategies Columbus Consolidated Government employed to develop an award-winning return-to-work program.
  • How American Airlines fostered a claims-closure culture to resolve complex legacy claims.

Those are only a few of the topics employers and service providers will present at this year’s conference, recognized as  the workers’ comp industry’s must-attend event of the year.

The R&I Editorial Team may be reached at [email protected]
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Risk Insider: Carla O'Sullivan

Audit Leave Management Vendors

By: | August 8, 2016 • 2 min read
Carla O’Sullivan is Education Programs Manager of the Disability Management Employer Coalition (DMEC), specializing in absence management. She can be reached at [email protected]

Outsourcing leave administration can save money and time, but outsourcing does not mean you wash your hands of the related responsibilities. Vendor management is critical.

The first step is to be clear on why you want to outsource.

Compliance that is timely, comprehensive and in line with federal and state regulations is a fundamental responsibility. Noncompliance can lead to problems for employees, management teams and the organization, resulting in legal and reputational risk not to mention penalties.

Vendors can provide expertise and systems that are often lacking for employers. Real-time reports and data aggregation provide insights for better decision-making. Improved communication among employees and managers generally results in better management leaves, especially intermittent leaves.

You should audit your vendor following six months of implementation, and then again annually, to ensure the program is performing to your expectations.

However, outsourcing also requires your own house to be in order. A regular internal audit is necessary. Following are key components of an internal audit:

Confirm and document program training took place. Survey employees about the training. Note necessary recommendations for improvement. Focus on training for new and existing supervisors. Train on practical knowledge, but also take the opportunity to meet key members who will help with your culture of compliance.

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Make certain policies are updated. Ensure changes have been communicated to vendor partners.

Review a few recent leaves. Gather all information available. Ideally, your provider can give a complete “audit report” of data, letters, emails, forms and call logs created during an employee’s leave. Interview employees for their perspective on the “customer experience.” Feedback of any kind will be very useful to your vendor.

Understand critical reports. Review weekly and monthly combined status reports, intermittent leave usage reports and reports that reveal key service times. The first two reports will give you insight into the current absence activity of your employee population and then department and regional trends. The third report will show your provider’s conformance to contractual and regulatory turnaround times.

Understand the employee experience. Canvass your employees and supervisors to gauge satisfaction with communications and the overall process. From supervisors and HR staff, you should be interested in the flow of information and communication.

Once you have a clear understanding of your internal processes and communication flow, you should then meet with your vendor. Oftentimes, this is reversed and employers want to meet with the vendors first to find solutions to a problem that may be present internally.

Inquire about how your vendor remains current with legal and regulatory changes. Learn how these changes are communicated internally and to your company. Walk through some recent cases. Are there are opportunities for learning and process improvement? Discuss how they intend to improve.

Your vendor should have self-audit processes in place and report findings to you on a regular basis. You should also audit your vendor following six months of implementation, and then again annually, to ensure the program is performing to your expectations.

You should work closely with your vendor to carefully track and resolve outstanding items that you uncover during this review. A summary of the audit with action items and timelines should be provided to you and should include a project plan for resolution.

Last, you cannot manage a program or vendor without data. Review the types of management reports available and understand what custom reports can be produced.

Expect reports to be clear, logical and actionable. The information should identify trends, include benchmarking data, and provide insight into how to address any issues.

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Sponsored: Liberty International Underwriters

Cyber: The Overlooked Environmental Threat

Environmental businesses often don't see themselves as a target, but their operations are just as vulnerable to the threat of an industrial cyber attack.
By: | August 3, 2016 • 6 min read
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“Cyber breach” conjures fears of lost or ransomed data, denial of service, leaked corporate secrets and phishing scams.

But in a world where so many physical operations are automated and controlled by digital technologies, the consequences of cyber attacks extend far beyond the digital realm to include property damage, bodily injury, and even environmental pollution.

Industrial companies that deal with hazardous materials — like power plants, refineries, factories, water treatment facilities or pipelines — are heavily dependent on automated technology to maximize their efficiency. Other sectors use technology to control HVAC systems, power and utilities, placing their properties at risk as well.

Cyber risks like theft of personally identifiable data have been highly publicized in recent years, but physical risks like pollution sparked by a cyber breach may not be as obvious.

“It’s significant to lose 100,000 customers’ Social Security numbers,” said William Bell, Senior Vice President, Environmental, Liberty International Underwriters, “but can you imagine if a waste treatment facility’s operations get hacked, gates open, and thousands of tons of raw sewage go flowing down a local river?”

In many industrial complexes, a network of sensors gathers and monitors data around machinery efficiency and the flow of the materials being processed. They send that information to computer terminals that interpret the data into commands for the hardware elements like motors, pumps and valves.

This automation technology can control, for example, the flow of pipelines, the level of water or waste held in a reservoir, or the gates that hold in and control the release of vast quantities of sewage and other process materials. Hackers who want to cause catastrophe could hijack that system and unleash damaging pollutants.

And it’s already happened.

In 2000, a hacker caused 800,000 liters of untreated sewage to flood the waterways of Maroochy Shire, Australia. In 2009, an IT contractor, disgruntled because he was not hired full-time, disabled leak detection alarm systems on three off-shore oil rigs near Long Beach, Calif.

Just last year, cyber attackers infiltrated the network of a German steel mill through a phishing scam, eventually hacking into the production control system and manipulating a blast furnace so it could not be shut down. The incident led to significant property damage.

According to a leading industrial security expert and executive director of the International Society of Automation, “Today’s operational technologies—such as sensors, SCADA systems, software and other controls that drive modern industrial processes—are vulnerable to cyber attack. The risk of serious damage or compromise to power and chemical plants, oil and gas facilities, chemical and water installations and other vital critical infrastructure assets is real.”

“The hacks could come from anywhere: a teenager looking for entertainment, a disgruntled worker, or more sophisticated criminals or terrorists,” Bell said. “There are certainly groups out there with political and ideological motivations to wreak that kind of havoc.”

LIU_SponsoredContent“We are working to bring the cyber component of environmental risk to the forefront. Cyber security is not just an IT issue. Industry executives need to be aware of the real-world risks and danger associated with an industrial cyber attack as well as the critical differences between cyber security and operational technology security.”

— William Bell, Senior Vice President, Environmental, Liberty International Underwriters

The cleanup cost of an environmental disaster can climb into the hundreds of millions, and even if a cyber breach triggered the event, a cyber policy alone will not cover the physical and environmental damage it caused.

The risk is even more pointed now, as resource conservation becomes increasingly important. Weather related catastrophe modeling is changing as both flooding and drought become more severe and frequent in different regions of the U.S. Pollution of major waterways and watersheds could have severe consequences if it affects drinking water sources, agriculture and other industrial applications that depend on this resource.

Managing the Risk

LIU_SponsoredContentUnfortunately, major industrial corporations sometimes address their environmental exposure with some hubris. They trust in their engineers to remove the risk by designing airtight systems, to make a disaster next to impossible. The prospect of buying environmental insurance, then, would be superfluous, an expression of doubt in their science-backed systems.

Despite the strongest risk management efforts, though, no disaster is 100 percent avoidable.

“We are working to bring the cyber component of environmental risk to the forefront,” Bell said. “Cyber security is not just an IT issue. Industry executives need to be aware of the real-world risks and danger associated with an industrial cyber attack as well as the critical differences between cyber security and operational technology security.”

The focus on network security and data protection has distracted industry leaders from strengthening operational technology security. Energy, manufacturing and other industrial sectors lack best practice standards when it comes to securing their automated processes.

After the Homeland Security Act of 2002, the Department of Homeland Security began comprehensive assessments of critical infrastructure’s cyber vulnerability, working with owners and operators to develop solutions. It also offers informational guides for private companies to do the same. The National Institute of Standards and Technology also continues work on its cyber security framework for critical infrastructure. Although this helps to establish some best practices, it does not completely mitigate the risk.

Many businesses don’t see themselves as a target, but they need to look beyond their own operations and property lines. They could be an attractive target due to their proximity to densely populated areas or resources such as waterways and highways, or nationally or historically significant areas. The goal of a cyber terrorist is not always to harm the target itself, but the collateral damage.

The Role of Insurance

LIU_SponsoredContent“Environmental liability is still by and large viewed as a discretionary purchase,” Bell said, “but the threat of a cyber attack that can manipulate those systems and ultimately lead to a pollution incident is added incentive to buy environmental coverage.”

Liberty International Underwriters’ environmental coverage could respond to many pollution conditions set off by a cyber breach event.

“Property damage, bodily injury and cleanup of any pollution at or emanating from a covered property would likely be taken care of,” Bell said. “The risk is not so much the cyber exposure but the consequence of the attack. The resulting claims and degradation to the environment could be severe, especially if the insured was a target chosen because of their unique position to have a large effect on the local population and environment.”

LIU also offers dedicated Cyber Liability insurance solutions designed to manage and mitigate the cost of responding to a cyber attack and any resultant loss of data and associated liability. Coverage includes proactive data breach response services designed to help organizations comply with regulatory requirements and prevent data breaches.

LIU’s loss control managers are also on hand to conduct assessments of insureds’ properties and facilities to examine potential environmental impacts. They can educate brokers on the importance of enhancing cyber security to prevent an environmental accident in the first place.

“People are relying more and more on their systems, automaton is increasing, and the risk is growing,” Bell said. “We’re all focused on protecting data, but the consequences of a cyber breach can be much farther reaching than data alone.”

To learn more about Liberty International Underwriters’ environmental coverages and services, visit www.LIU-USA.com.

Liberty International Underwriters is the marketing name for the broker-distributed specialty lines business operations of Liberty Mutual Insurance. Certain coverage may be provided by a surplus lines insurer. Surplus lines insurers do not generally participate in state guaranty funds and insureds are therefore not protected by such funds. This literature is a summary only and does not include all terms, conditions, or exclusions of the coverage described. Please refer to the actual policy issued for complete details of coverage and exclusions.

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This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with Liberty International Underwriters. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.

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LIU is part of the Global Specialty Division of Liberty Mutual Insurance.
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