Seasonal Safety

No Humbug on Safety for This Workplace

The North Pole is one of the safest workplaces in the world, thanks to the top-down leadership style of its internationally recognized CEO.
By: | December 11, 2014 • 5 min read
Santa forklift

If you were to study some of the safest and most successful organizations, you’d see that many of them share a common philosophy: When the CEO takes ownership of the safety program, it sends a message to the entire company that safety is top priority. That universal truth is evident at organizations around the world — including the North Pole.

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North Pole CEO Santa Claus is a stickler for safety, and he knows how to drive results. For the 2014 holiday season, there were only 15 OSHA recordable elf injuries, down 15 percent from last year. There were only two serious lost-time injuries in 2014, both Fleet Management employees, related to a trampling incident involving Donner and Blitzen. (Both reindeer have since received anger management counseling through the organization’s employee assistance program.)

Those injury statistics are quite remarkable, when you consider that the North Pole workforce is more than 10,000 strong, with 80 percent of elves involved in high-hazard work in toy manufacturing, product testing and quality assurance, packaging and warehouse operations.

Always New Challenges

Claus personally chairs the organization’s safety committee, which includes representatives from departments such as Toy Operations, Reindeer Fleet Management, Wish List Fulfillment, Sled Logistics and Sweets Services. Committee members take ownership of safety for their departments, leading weekly training sessions for their teams on job-specific issues such as avoiding slips and falls from spilled hot cocoa, and wearing safety goggles while product testing Nerf guns and using cut-resistant gloves to reduce the paper-cut risk for staff members tasked with opening and filing letters to Santa.

Santa faces unique risk management challenges every year. In the 1960s, a change to the Silly Putty formula caused widespread cases of chemical sensitivity among handlers. In 1996, a dozen product testers working on Tickle Me Elmo had to be treated for Reynaud’s Syndrome.  “We should’ve seen that one coming,” said Claus ruefully, as he explained how stricter vibration protocols were put in place after that season.

The broad range of toys manufactured at the North Pole present a myriad of safety risks to elf workers.

The broad range of toys manufactured at the North Pole present a myriad of safety risks to elf workers.

The increasing trend toward electronic toys has brought its own set of challenges to Claus’ team. Many of the North Pole’s aging elves have been assigned to circuit board assembly because it is less physically demanding work than Big Wheel assembly or operating the Lego molding machines. However, the fine-detail nature of the work has led to complaints of eyestrain, leading Claus to invest heavily in magnifiers to accommodate his elder elves.

Claus is extremely proud of his return to work/stay at work program.  Even elves with mobility issues can pitch in, delivering tools and parts anywhere they’re needed on the factory floor, via R/C Air Hog transport helicopters. Others conduct regular safety inspections enterprise-wide, using small camera equipped hobby drones. When the two workers involved in the reindeer trampling incident were suffering from PTSD, they were assigned to light-duty, low-stress tasks to aid in their recovery, including candy cane testing and topping coworkers’ cocoa with whipped cream. “They were kept at full salary,” explained Claus, “and we were able to put them in jobs that made them smile and made everyone around them smile. Surrounding them in happiness helped them heal from the trauma of that frightening incident.”

Wellness Champion

The most recent additions to the North Pole safety and workers’ comp program were championed by Claus’ wife, Jessica, who has taken on the role of Executive Vice President for Wellness and Ergonomics for the entire organization. Mrs. Claus has organized a required daily stretching program for the beginning of each work day. Everyone participates, even the Jolly old Elf himself. She also leads wildly popular Twister Yoga classes to keep workers limber and alert, and to help manage seasonal stress. Claus is an avid health advocate, sending out newsletters full of healthy holiday tips, including recipes for stevia-sweetened sugar cookies, reminders to replace a few servings of fruitcake with fresh fruit, and warnings about the dangers of excessive eggnog abuse.

Mrs. Claus, who is even more tireless than her globe-trotting husband, also oversees the in-house claims management team, and the on-site nursing staff. Simple injuries such as candy cane splinters are treated right away and elves are back on the job in mere minutes. Nurse case managers fulfil other roles as well, such as suggesting temporary reassignment for elves suffering from tinnitus from high-decibel jingle bells.

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In 2015, Claus is planning on adding new elements to the program. A voluntary biometric testing program is in the works. A spare storage room is being refashioned into a fitness “PlayZone” equipped with two dozen large screen TVs connected to Xbox One and PlayStation Move, and fully stocked with high-action movement games and fitness programs. Mrs. Claus is also working with the in-house design and fabrication teams to develop a new line of elf shoes with fitness-tracker bells to help motivate workers to move more. “Elves thrive on friendly competition,” said the EVP. “I hope to tap into that by developing an app with a leaderboard showing everyone’s steps. Toy-making is all about teamwork and cooperation. This will give each elf a chance to show off and be a star.”

Santa Claus told Risk & Insurance® that while he couldn’t share the actual numbers, the ROI on the North Pole’s safety and workers’ comp investments is off the charts. But Claus said that he and Mrs. Claus are more focused on the real sprit of safety. “Safe and happy elves make safer games and toys,” said Claus. “That means safer kids all over the world. There’s a lot more riding on our safety program than cost control,” he added with a wink of his eye and a twist of his head.

Wishing you a safe and Happy Holiday season from WorkersComp Forum!

Michelle Kerr is associate editor of Risk & Insurance. She can be reached at mkerr@lrp.com
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Adjuster X

A Matter of Defense

By: | December 10, 2014 • 3 min read
This column is based on the experiences of a group of long-time claims adjusters. The situations they describe are real, but the names and key details are kept confidential. Michelle Kerr is the editor of this column and can be reached at mkerr@lrp.com.

“We have a bad one over at Dietrich Parcel Delivery Service,” said my supervisor.

“Some kid got de-gloved by a conveyor belt. Get out there now.”

Mark Wilson, an 18-year-old, had got his right hand caught in a conveyor belt. “Ripped the flesh off of his index through his pinky finger. Ugly injury with blood everywhere,” said Keith, the director of risk management. Wilson was transported to the hospital and admitted. The injury was witnessed.

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“Seems cut and dried to me,” I said.

Keith looked pained. “Well … he wasn’t exactly at work,” he said. “Mark resigned last week. He was here picking up his last paycheck.”

First things first — I needed to speak to the witness. Keith introduced me to Ron Miller, 19, an employee for more than a year. He and Wilson had worked together for several months.

Miller said Wilson approached him at 10:15 a.m. to chat after picking up his last paycheck. As they were speaking, Wilson casually placed his right hand on the edge of a stopped conveyor belt.

“If you deny the claim and he hires an attorney, any lawyer will tell him to file a liability action, which is far more lucrative.” — Adjuster X

There was a sign above the belt that read: “Do not place hands on or near conveyor belt.” The belt suddenly started moving and Miller immediately hit the “kill” switch but  Wilson’s hand had already been pulled into the power sprocket pulley. He was screaming and covered in blood.

My next stop was the hospital. Wilson was being stabilized. I was able to speak to the attending physician on the case. Wilson had lost most of the flesh on his four right fingers. The doctor estimated a 16 to 20 week disability period.

I was able to see Wilson the next morning for a statement. His account matched up with Miller’s. He explained that since everyone at the plant knew him, no one stopped him from walking through the plant, even though he no longer worked there.

Wilson’s parents were with him. His father asked what type of insurance would be covering the medical costs. I explained that I was working to determine that, and would advise them shortly.

I consulted defense counsel and then went back to speak with Keith. I explained that as Wilson was no longer an employee, he was not in the course and scope of employment at the time of the accident. As such, the claim could be denied under workers’ compensation. “However,” I cautioned, “he will probably be successful if he challenges the denial.”

Keith was astounded. I explained that when Wilson came to pick up his paycheck, which the company authorized, no one escorted him out. That allowed him to go see his friend.

“He can argue that picking up his paycheck was an act intrinsic to his job, because the paycheck would have not been disbursed if he had not worked here.

“Unfortunately,” I added, “the WC courts in this state have found compensability on far less.”

Keith was adamant. “I want this claim denied!”

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I sighed. “You can do that. But you’ll be exposed under your liability cover, which is $5 million. He can mount a compelling argument that the company was negligent in not having safety guards around the conveyor belt.”

I gave that a moment to sink in. “If you deny the claim and he hires an attorney, any lawyer will tell him to file a liability action, which is far more lucrative.”

Keith ruminated for a moment. “We just can’t seem to win on this comp stuff,” he said.

“Think of it as the cost of protecting your liability cover,” I said. “Relax. It could have been worse.”

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Sponsored: Liberty Mutual Insurance

Passion for the Prize

Managing today’s complex energy risks requires that insurers match the industry’s dedication and expertise.
By: | December 10, 2014 • 6 min read

In his 1990 book, The Prize: The Epic Quest for Oil, Money and Power, Pulitzer Prize winning author Daniel Yergin documented the passion that drove oil exploration from the first oil well sunk in Titusville, Penn. by Col. Edwin Drake in 1859, to the multinational crusades that enriched Saudi Arabia 100 years later.

Even with the recent decline in crude oil prices, the quest for oil and its sister substance, natural gas, is as fevered now as it was in 1859.

While lower product prices are causing some upstream oil and gas companies to cut back on exploration and production, they create opportunities for others. In fact, for many midstream oil and gas companies, lower prices create an opportunity to buy low, store product, and then sell high when the crude and gas markets rebound.

The current record supply of domestic crude oil and gas largely results from horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing methods, which make it practical to extract product in formerly played-out or untapped formations, from the Panhandle to the Bakken.

But these technologies — and the current market they helped create — require underwriters that are as passionate, committed and knowledgeable about energy risk as the oil and gas explorers they insure.

Liability fears and incessant press coverage — from the Denton fracking ban to the Heckmann verdict — may cause some underwriters to regard fracking and horizontal drilling with a suppressed appetite. Other carriers, keen to generate premium revenue despite their limited industry knowledge, may try to buy their way into this high-stakes game with soft pricing.

For Matt Waters, the chief underwriting officer of Liberty Mutual Commercial Insurance Specialty – Energy, this is the time to employ a deep underwriting expertise to embrace the current energy market and extraction methods responsibly and profitably.

“In the oil and gas business right now, you have to have risk solutions for the new market, fracking and horizontal drilling, and it can’t be avoidance,” Waters said.

Matt Waters, chief underwriting officer of Liberty Mutual Commercial Insurance Specialty – Energy, reviews some risk management best practices for fracking and horizontal drilling.

Waters’ group underwrites upstream energy risks — those involved in all phases of onshore exploration and production of crude oil and natural gas from wells sunk into the earth — and midstream energy risks, those that involve the distribution or transportation of oil and gas to processing plants, refineries and consumers.

Risk in Motion

Seven to eight years ago, the technologies to horizontally drill and use fluids to fracture shale formations were barely in play. Now they are well established and have changed the domestic energy market, and consequently risk management for energy companies.

One of those changes is in the area of commercial auto and related coverages.

Fracking and horizontal drilling have dramatically altered oil and gas production, significantly increasing the number of vehicle trips to production and exploration sites. The new technologies require vehicles move water for drilling fluids and fracking, remove these fluids once they are used, bring hundreds of tons of chemicals and proppants, and transport all the specialty equipment required for these extraction methods.

The increase in vehicle use comes at a time when professional drivers, especially those with energy skills, are in short supply. The unfortunate result is more accidents.

SponsoredContent_LM“In the oil and gas business right now, you have to have risk solutions for the new market, fracking and horizontal drilling, and it can’t be avoidance.”
— Matt Waters, chief underwriting officer, Liberty Mutual Commercial Insurance Specialty – Energy

For example, in Pennsylvania, home to the gas-rich Marcellus Shale formation, overall traffic fatalities across the state are down 19 percent, according to a recent analysis by the Associated Press. But in those Pennsylvania counties where natural gas and oil is being sought, the frequency of traffic fatalities is up 4 percent.

Increasing traffic volume and accidents is also driving frequency trends in workers compensation and general liability.

In the assessment and transfer of upstream and midstream energy risks, however, there simply isn’t enough claims history in the Marcellus formation in Pennsylvania or the Bakken formation in North Dakota for underwriters to rely on data to price environmental, general and third-party liability risks.

That’s where Liberty Mutual’s commitment, experience and ability to innovate come in. Liberty Mutual was the first carrier to put together a hydraulic fracking risk assessment that gives companies using this extraction method a blueprint to help protect against litigation down the road.

Liberty Mutual insures both lease operators and the contractors essential to extracting hydrocarbons. As in many underwriting areas, the name of the game is clarity around what the risk is, and who owns it.

When considering fracking contractors, Waters and his team work to make sure that any “down hole” risks, be that potential seismic activity, or the migration of methane into water tables, is born by the lease holder.

For the lease holders, Waters and his team of specialty underwriters recommend their clients hold both “sudden and accidental” pollution coverage — to protect against quick and clear accidental spills — and a stand-alone pollution policy, which covers more gradual exposure that unfolds over a much longer period of time, such as methane leaking into drinking water supplies.

Those are two different distinct coverages, both of which a lease holder needs.

Matt Waters discusses the need for stand-alone environmental coverage.

The Energy Cycle

Domestic oil and gas production has expanded so drastically in the past five years that the United States could now become a significant energy exporter. Billions of dollars are being invested to build pipelines, liquid natural gas processing plants and export terminals along our coasts.

While managing risk for energy companies requires deep expertise, developing insurance programs for pipeline and other energy-related construction projects demands even more experience. Such programs must manage and mitigate both construction and operation risks.

Matt Waters discusses future growth for midstream oil and gas companies.

In the short-term, domestic gas and oil production is being curtailed some as fuel prices have recently plummeted due to oversupply. In the long-term, those domestic prices are likely to go back up again, particularly if legislation allows the fuel harvested in the United States to be exported to energy deficient Europe.

Waters and his underwriting team are in this energy game for the long haul — with some customers being with the operation for more than 25 years — and have industry-leading tools to play in it.

Beyond Liberty Mutual’s hydraulic fracturing risk assessment sheet, Waters’ area created a commercial driver scorecard to help its midstream and upstream clients select and manage drivers, which are in such great demand in the industry. The safety and skill of those drivers play a big part in preventing commercial auto claims, Waters said.

Liberty Mutual’s commitment to the energy market is also seen in Waters sending every member of his underwriting team to the petroleum engineering program at the University of Texas and hiring underwriters that are passionate about this industry.

Matt Waters explains how his area can add value to oil and gas companies and their insurance brokers and agents.

For Waters, politics and the trends of the moment have little place in his long-term thinking.

“We’re committed to this business and to deeply understanding how to best manage its risks, and we have been for a long time,” Waters said.

And that holds true for the latest extraction technologies.

“We’ve had success writing fracking contractors and horizontal drillers, helping them better manage the total cost of risk,” Waters said.

To learn more about how Liberty Mutual Insurance can meet your upstream and midstream energy coverage needs, contact your broker, or Matt Waters at matthew.waters@libertymutual.com.

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This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with Liberty Mutual Insurance. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.


Liberty Mutual Insurance offers a wide range of insurance products and services, including general liability, property, commercial automobile, excess casualty, workers compensation and group benefits.
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