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2014 NWC&DC

Focusing on Results

Selecting a network of the best medical providers can result in reduced costs and better medical results for workers.
By: | November 20, 2014 • 3 min read
Outcomes

Partnering with medical providers that deliver top quality care leads to better results for workers while lowering claims, treatment duration, indemnity costs and incidents of permanent partial disability, according to presenters at an “Improving Claims Outcomes Using Outcomes-Based Networks” session, presented at the 2014 National Workers’ Compensation and Disability Management Conference & Expo in Las Vegas.

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“It has helped us by driving our costs down,” said Randy Triplett, manager, workers’ compensation & IDM, The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., who was joined on the panel by Jane Ish, national networks manager, commercial insurance, Liberty Mutual Insurance.

Instead of focusing on weeding out “bad” medical providers, it’s better to focus on attracting a medical eco-system with the best physicians, hospitals and groups, said Ish.

“We are looking to attract honey instead of vinegar,” she said.

“Physician evaluation is key to creating our networks,” she said, noting that partnering with claims and medical management professionals to get information on physicians is crucial. “We need to understand what his tools are, what his referral patterns are.”

It is not a simple task, however, she said. Sometimes, there is not enough claims data to support selection into a network and sometimes geographic limitations – such as a lack of providers or facilities – can hamper creation of an effective OBN.

But the results are impressive, said Triplett. His company’s North Carolina plant saw a 64 percent reduction in lost work days, while Goodyear’s top six plants saw a 33 percent decrease in lost work days.

In putting its network together, Goodyear needed to persuade unionized workers, who by contract have the right to choose their physicians. The company’s focus on safety and its mantra of “the right treatment at the right time” helped convince workers, he said.

“It’s taken more than seven years working hard to build confidence that what we are trying to do is in their best interests,” he said.

Even in states where the company cannot direct the care of injured workers, the employees will often ask the company for physician referrals.

“We have been a paternalistic company for our entire existence. … Our associates expect the best from us,” Triplett said.

“Any time there is a positive interaction between a network provider and an associate, it builds a stronger relationship,” he said.

Orthopedic injuries – shoulder, knee and back “in that order” – are the top employee issues, he said.

The company has onsite medical facilities staffed by physician assistants, nurse practitioners and, for two or three days a week, doctors. Initial examinations are nearly always held at the plants, Triplett said.

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The company also invites all outside medical staff to tour the facilities once a year to create a better understanding of the business and locations.

When employees are released to return to work, Goodyear puts the employees through a process of “work hardening” to ensure they are ready for full duty, he said.

One hospital group recently made the RTW transition easier by releasing injured workers to onsite physicians when they believed they were ready to return to work, he said.

“It allows us to manage that last part of that care and get our associates back to work. It’s all about outcomes and finding networks and physicians that will work with you to return your associates to work,” he said.

Anne Freedman is managing editor of Risk & Insurance. She can be reached at afreedman@lrp.com.
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Regulatory Tangle

EEOC Targets Wellness Programs

While beneficial to WC costs, there is confusion over whether wellness programs can carry penalties for non-participation.
By: | November 14, 2014 • 6 min read
smoking cessation

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has filed suit against three employers for violating the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) with their company wellness programs.

Honeywell, Orion Energy Systems and Flambeau Inc. are all facing litigation over penalties and fines levied against employees who refused to participate in company wellness programs.

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Employers that offer voluntary programs may ask participating employees disability-related questions and collect results from biometric testing and other medical exams, as long as they keep the information confidential — and the program is truly “voluntary.” The EEOC has determined that if an employee faces any kind of discipline for refusing to participate, such as a fine or becoming responsible for the full cost of their health plan premium, then the program is in essence involuntary.

“The EEOC describes it as ‘you can’t penalize employees,’ but they have not defined what constitutes a penalty,” said Debra Friedman, attorney with Cozen O’Connor’s labor and employment practice group.

On its surface, the EEOC stance appears to collide with the ACA. The federal rule on “Incentives for Nondiscriminatory Wellness Programs in Group Health Plans,” in fact, allows for penalties in certain circumstances. By defining “reward,” for the sake of the ACA, as meaning either incentives or penalties, the law’s language allows a maximum permissible wellness program incentive (or penalty) of up to 30 percent of the cost of health care coverage, jumping up to 50 percent for programs designed to prevent or reduce tobacco use.

However, the ACA is clear that these reward rules apply to health-contingent wellness programs that are tied to a desired outcome. The law contains no direct guidelines for rewards associated with participatory wellness programs, such biometric testing programs where employees are not obligated to take further action to meet a specific standard (such as attain a specific blood-pressure range or BMI level).

Is It Really Voluntary?

In its litigation against Honeywell, the third employer sued by the commission, the EEOC pointed out that employees not participating in the company’s program would have to pay up to $2,500 in “direct surcharges,” as well as lose “up to $1,500 in contributions” to their health savings accounts. While they don’t need to achieve any particular results, employees must submit to biometric testing in order to receive a premium discount.

“The EEOC describes it as ‘you can’t penalize employees,’ but they have not defined what constitutes a penalty,” — Debra Friedman, attorney, Cozen O’Connor’s labor and employment practice group

At Flambeau and Orion Energy, employees who opted out of the wellness program were forced to pay 100 percent of their health insurance premium. The EEOC asserted that these penalties were so extreme and had such “dire consequences” that, in practice, they rendered the wellness programs involuntary.

In programs and required medical exams that are involuntary, the ADA states that employers cannot ask disability related or other personal medical questions that are not “job-related and consistent with business necessity.” There are some exceptions to this rule, but none that apply to the three employers facing suits.

On Nov. 3rd, however, the U.S. District Court for the District of Minnesota denied the EEOC’s request for a temporary restraining order and preliminary injunction against Honeywell, stating that the company’s program aims to raise awareness among its employees about their health indicators, but does not break any laws because it doesn’t require any behavior changes. The court did note, though, that the case raises interesting questions as to how the ACA, ADA and GINA will work together.

Wellness and Workers’ Comp

The Affordable Care Act requires employers to make wellness a priority in the workplace, and employers have much to gain by doing so. While there’s little research that shows a direct effect of wellness programs on workers’ comp costs, more information is coming out that supports how reducing certain risk factors can shorten claim duration and minimize claim costs. Modifiable risk factors like obesity, COPD and depression can lengthen injury recovery time.

“We see a trend in employers implementing wellness programs because they are interested in the health, welfare and longevity of their workforce,” said Bob Stoner, SVP of operations for BTE Workforce Solutions. “Healthier employees are more productive employees.”

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While wellness programs typically fall in the realm of employee health benefits, administrators of workers’ comp programs should take an equal interest and work internally to coordinate their efforts.

“If you’re 50 years old and depressed, your workers’ comp claim is going to cost more than someone who is 50 but has a great support network and positive outlook,” said Karen Curran, director of health risk management at Pinnacol Assurance.

“Employers need to understand this is an evolving area, and there’s a lack of guidance from the EEOC, so we need to wait and see whether EEOC and courts will find wellness programs that are compliant with the ACA regulations to be compliant with ADA and GINA,” Friedman said. “Employers should make sure there is no discipline against an employee for refusing to participate, and I would recommend not shifting full costs of premium to employee. The safest route is to stick to participatory programs.”

Participatory programs would include things like no-cost health seminars and positive rewards for submitting to a health risk assessments, said Terri Rhodes, executive director of the Disability Management Employer Coalition. The ACA also allows for biometric screenings to be considered participatory as long as employees are not penalized based on the results or required to take further action to change the results.

Health-contingent or outcome-based programs, on the other hand, attach significant rewards or penalties to meeting specific goals, such as in a smoking-cessation or weight loss target, or anything measured around biometric standards, such as blood pressure or cholesterol. These types of programs run a higher risk of running afoul of the ADA and GINA.

“Employers need to be very careful about collection and handling of any family medical history,” Stoner said. “Employee information must be provided voluntarily and with clear written consent, and kept separate and confidential from personnel records. Wellness programs that incorporate financial penalties or incentives must be carefully crafted in order to be compliant.”

Culture Is Key

Curran said the best way for employers to avoid running afoul of the ADA and GINA is to retool their workplace safety culture to make unhealthy behaviors more difficult.

For example, one of her clients had an enclosed sunroom on their property where workers were permitted to smoke. The room was equipped with picnic tables, comfy couches, and plenty of windows and natural light.

“They were making it an enjoyable environment and making it easy for people to smoke,” she said. “That makes it hard for people to quit.” She advised that the smoking area be moved from the sunroom to an outdoor area underneath an umbrella, with no tables or chairs. That makes smoking less enjoyable and quitting a little bit easier to commit to. It also doesn’t violate any laws because the company was not taking away any employee’s right to smoke nor asking them to join a cessation program, but simply asking them to smoke in a different area of the campus.

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“It’s not so much about the program as it is about engaging your workforce,” Rhodes said. “I think that’s something employers struggle with, especially with a multi-generational workforce.”

Curran also advised sprucing up stairways with colorful paint and adequate lighting and slowing down elevators to encourage taking the stairs. Adding healthy snacks to vending machines and raising the price of candy bars slightly to offset the expense is another way to “make the healthy choice the easy choice.”

“Look at what you can do to create a culture of wellness, and the ADA doesn’t even come into play,” she said.

Katie Siegel is a staff writer at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at ksiegel@lrp.com.
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Sponsored: Healthesystems

Changing the WC Medical Care Mindset

Having a holistic, comprehensive strategy is critical in the ongoing battle to control medical care costs.
By: | November 3, 2014 • 6 min read
SponsoredContent_HES

Controlling overall workers’ compensation medical costs has been an elusive target.

Yet, according to medical experts from Healthesystems, the Tampa, Fla.-based specialty provider of innovative medical cost management solutions for the workers’ compensation industry, payers today have more powerful options for both offering the highest quality medical care and controlling costs, but they must be more thoroughly and strategically executed.

Specifically as it relates to optimizing patient outcomes and controlling pharmacy costs, the key, say those experts, is to look beyond the typical clinical pharmacy history review and to incorporate a more holistic picture of the entire medical treatment plan. This means when performing clinical reviews, taking into account more comprehensive information such as lab results, physician notes and other critical medical history data which often identifies significant treatment plan concerns but frequently aren’t effectively monitored in total.

Healthesystems’ Dr. Robert Goldberg, chief medical officer, and Dr. Silvia Sacalis, vice president of clinical services, recently weighed in on how using a more holistic, comprehensive strategy can make the critical difference in the ongoing medical care cost control battle.

Fragmentation, Complexity Obscure the Patient Picture

According to Dr. Goldberg, fragmentation remains one of the biggest obstacles to controlling overall healthcare costs and ensuring the most successful treatment in workers’ compensation.

Robert Goldberg, MD, discusses obstacles to controlling overall medical costs and ensuring the best treatment in workers’ compensation.

“There are several hurdles, but they all relate to the fact that healthcare in workers’ comp is just not very well coordinated,” he said. “For the most part, there is poor communication between all parties involved, but especially between the payer and the provider. Unfortunately, it’s rare that all the stakeholders have a clear, complete picture of what’s happening with the patient.”

Dr. Goldberg explains that health care generally has become a more complex landscape, and workers’ comp adds another level of complexity. Physicians have less time to spend with patients due to work loads and other economic factors, and frequently there isn’t adequate time to develop a patient specific treatment strategy.

“Often we don’t have physicians properly incentivized to do a complete job with patients” he said, adding that extra paperwork and similar hurdles limit communication among payers, nurse case managers and other players.

In fact, Dr. Sacalis emphasized that it’s not only the payer, but often the healthcare provider who is not getting a complete picture. For example, a treating doctor may not be the primary care physician and therefore they may not have access to the total healthcare picture for the injured worker.

SponsoredContent_HES“Most of all, payers need to adopt a more collaborative approach in their relationships with physicians, employers and patients, as well as networks involved. It will result in getting people back to work through appropriate medical care and moving the case along to a prompt closure.”
– Robert Goldberg, MD, FACOEM, Chief Medical Officer, Healthesystems

“It’s often difficult for multiple physicians to communicate and collaborate about what’s happening because they may not be aware of each-others involvement in that patient’s care,” she said. “Data sharing is lacking, even in integrated healthcare systems where doctors are in the same group.”

Done Right, Technology Can Bridge the Treatment Strategy Gap

Dr. Sacalis explained the role technology advancements can play in creating a more holistic picture of not only an injured workers’ post-accident state or pace of recovery, but also their overall health history. However, the workers’ comp industry by and large is not there yet.

“Today’s technology can be very useful in providing transparency, but to date the data is still very fragmented,” she said. “With technology advancements, we can get a more holistic patient view. However, it is important that the data is both meaningful and actionable to promote effective clinical decision support.”

Silvia Sacalis, PharmD, explains the role that technology advancements can play in creating a more holistic picture of an injured worker’s overall health.

Healthesystems, for example, offers an advanced clinical solution that incorporates a comprehensive analysis of all relevant data sources including pharmacy, medical and lab data as part of a drug therapy analysis. So, for example, the process could uncover co-morbidities – such as diabetes – that may be unrelated to a workplace injury but should be considered in the overall treatment strategy.

“Healthcare professionals must ensure there are no interactions with any
co-morbidities that may limit or affect the treatment plan,” Dr. Sacalis said.

In the majority of cases where Healthesystems has performed advanced clinical analysis, information gathered from the various sources has uncovered critical information that significantly impacted the overall treatment recommendations. Technology and analytics enable the implementation of best practices.

She cites another example of how a physician may order a urine drug screen (UDS), yet the results indicating the presence of a non prescribed drug were not reflected in the treatment regimen as evidenced by the lack of modification in therapy.

“Visibility and transparency will help with facilitating a truly effective treatment plan,” she said, “Predictive analytics are necessary tools for proactive monitoring and detection of trends as well as early identification of cases for intervention.”

Speaking of Best Practices …

Dr. Goldberg highlighted that the most important overall best practice needed to secure the optimal outcome is centered around getting the right care to the right patient at the right time. To him, that means identifying patients who need adjustments in care and then determining medical necessity during the entire case trajectory.

“It means using evidence-based medical treatment guidelines that are coordinated,” he said.

“You must look at the whole patient, which means avoiding the typical barriers in the workers’ comp treatment system, issues such as delays in authorizations, lengthy UR processes or similar scenarios that are well intentioned but if not performed effectively they can get in the way of expedited care.”

Dr. Goldberg and Silvia Sacalis provide recommendations for critical steps payers should take to achieve the best outcomes for everyone.

Dr. Goldberg noted that seeking out the most effective doctors available in geographic locations is another critical best practice. That requires collecting data on physician performance, patient satisfaction and medical outcomes, so payers and networks can identify and incentivize them accordingly.

“This way, you are getting an alignment of incentives with all parties,” Dr. Goldberg said, adding that it also means removing outlier physicians, those whose tendencies are to over-treat, dispense drugs from their office or order unnecessary durable medical equipment, for example.

SponsoredContent_HES“Visibility and transparency will help with facilitating a truly effective treatment plan. Predictive analytics are necessary tools for proactive monitoring and detection of trends as well as early identification of cases for intervention.”
– Silvia Sacalis, PharmD, Vice President of Clinical Services, Healthesystems

“Most of all, payers need to adopt a more collaborative approach in their relationships with physicians, employers and patients, as well as networks involved,” he said. “It will result in getting people back to work through appropriate medical care and moving the case along to a prompt closure.”

Dr. Sacalis added that from a pharmacy perspective, another best practice is becoming more patient-centric, using a customized and flexible approach to help payers optimize outcomes for each patient.

“Focus on patient safety first, and that will naturally drive cost containment,” she said. “Focusing on cost alone can actually drive results in the wrong direction.”

Additional Insights 

Dr. Goldberg explains how consolidation in the health care and WC markets can impact the landscape and quality of care.

Dr. Goldberg and Silvia Sacalis discuss if injured workers today are getting better treatment than they were twenty years ago.

SponsoredContent

BrandStudioLogo

This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with Healthesystems. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.


Healthesystems is a leading provider of Pharmacy Benefit Management (PBM) & Ancillary Benefits Management programs for the workers' compensation industry.
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