Column: Workers' Comp

The Case for Exoskeletons

By: | October 15, 2016 • 2 min read
Roberto Ceniceros is senior editor at Risk & Insurance® and chair of the National Workers' Compensation and Disability Conference® & Expo. He can be reached at [email protected] Read more of his columns and features.

I hope more workers’ compensation insurers seriously evaluate paying for exoskeletons that allow patients with certain spinal cord injuries to rise from their wheelchairs and walk.

Exoskeletons are assistive devices often described as “wearable robots” or “Segways with legs.” Since 2014, the Food and Drug Administration has approved two models for personal use, including one earlier this year.

Some workers’ comp insurers have already approved a few claims for the motorized devices and the cost of training. Other underwriters have declined to fund them.

The battery-powered devices cost at least $80,000 plus additional training. Safety questions remain and some doctors who agree on the medical benefits they provide are still wary of certifying them as “medically necessary.”

But the products are among technological advancements in patient care — like increasingly sophisticated prosthesis — that payers should learn about to adequately weigh the exoskeleton’s price tag against potential medical care and medication expense reductions resulting from their benefits.

“Psychological benefits also result from standing, walking and looking others eye to eye. Well-being impacts claims expense.” – Clare Hartigan, physical therapist, exoskeleton clinical trail leader at Shepherd Center

Attendees at the National Workers’ Compensation and Disability Conference® & Expo in New Orleans can watch an injured worker’s exoskeleton demonstration during a session titled “The Bionic Claimant: Emerging Medical Technology’s Impact on Care and Cost.”

Clare Hartigan, a physical therapist who will speak during the session, has led clinical trials on exoskeletons at the Shepherd Center, a rehab hospital in Atlanta. She will be joined by Mark Sidney, VP of claims at Midwest Employers Casualty Co.


Exoskeletons’ well-documented medical benefits for spinal injury patients include improved bowel and bladder function, weight loss and better glucose test results, Hartigan said.

“Psychological benefits also result from standing, walking and looking others eye to eye,” Hartigan said. “Well-being impacts claims expense.”

Apart from clinical uses and workers’ comp, other exoskeleton applications are emerging. The military is testing robotic-like suits that could help soldiers carry more weight and reach the battleground less fatigued.

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health expects rapid growth in industrial wearable exoskeleton suits that can help workers lift greater loads or hold up heavier tools for longer periods.

But it would also be great to see more workers who have lost their mobility in workplace accidents benefit from the health and quality-of-life improvements exoskeletons offer. Perhaps that will come as more insurers learn about exoskeletons and begin evaluating their unit costs against their impact on medical expenses.

We can also hope for decreases in exoskeletons’ cost as commonly occurs with most technology products. But the companies offering them will need to recoup their R&D expenses. &

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2016 NWCDC

Workers’ Compensation Conference Program Released

NWCDC's presentations offer leading-edge strategies from employers and other experts to mitigate workers' comp and disability challenges.
By: | August 15, 2016 • 3 min read

Savvy employers have increasingly adopted injured-worker advocacy and engagement strategies to help employees overcome fears and challenges encountered when navigating workers’ compensation systems.

William Wainscott, manager, workers’ comp and occupational health, International Paper

William Wainscott, manager, workers’ comp and occupational health, International Paper

“The workers’ compensation claim process can be confusing and intimidating,” said William Wainscott, manager, workers’ comp and occupational health at International Paper.

“For the injured employee there are a lot of unknowns. An advocate helps alleviate the fears and guides them through all the issues.”

Wainscott will speak on an employer panel discussing injured-employee advocacy and engagement programs at the 25th Annual National Workers’ Compensation and Disability Management Conference® & Expo scheduled for Nov. 30 to Dec. 2 in New Orleans.

Minimizing a workplace injury’s impact on employees, their families and employers requires helping the injured worker access the right resources and understand their role in the recovery and return-to-work process, he said.

Wainscott is an NWCDC program co-chair and helped develop the conference’s 2016 agenda.


The agenda highlights other planned presentations featuring employers discussing leading-edge strategies for mitigating workers’ comp and disability challenges.

“We have put together a really strong agenda with topics that are meaningful for employers and other payer groups like insurance companies and third-party administrators,” said Denise Algire, who is also an NWCDC program co-chair and director of managed care and disability corporate risk at Albertsons Cos.

Addressing mental health factors impacting the recovery of workers’ comp and disability claimants is another focus of conference sessions developed to help meet growing employer and claims payer interest in the topic.

“Mental illness affects both workers’ comp and non-occupational disability,” Algire said.

Historically, there has been tremendous stigma around the topic, but more employers now understand that mental health issues impact absenteeism and productivity.

“There is more emphasis on this as organizations realize that the No. 1 reason for short-term disability claims is either depression or some other mental illness,” Algire added.

“So talking about it and understanding what solutions and options are available for employees, and how to implement those programs within your organization is an important conversation.”

Algire will also speak as part of the NWCDC panel discussing injured-employee advocacy programs.

In addition to Algire and Wainscott, the panel will include Kimberly George, senior VP and senior healthcare advisor at Sedgwick Claims Management Services, and Scott Daniels, director of disability at Comcast.

Daniels will also speak as part of another panel titled “Mental Matters: How Mental Health Impacts Productivity and Performance.”

That is not the only conference presentation on mental health issues.

Tim East, director of risk management, The Walt Disney Company

Tim East, director of risk management, The Walt Disney Company

Donna Morrison, corporate healthcare director at UPS, will join Michael Lacroix, associate medical director of behavioral health at Aetna Life Insurance and Coventry Workers’ Comp Services, to deliver a presentation titled “Advances in Behavioral Health Disability Claims Management Strategies.”

In total, the conference features 31 breakout sessions, two general sessions, and a keynote address delivered by Tim East, director of corporate risk management at The Walt Disney Co.

During his presentation titled “Fueling Injury Recovery with Engaged Workers,” East will discuss how technology trends impact workers’ expectations for how employers engage them.

Worker engagement and solutions for mental health’s impact on claim duration are not the only topics awaiting NWCDC attendees.

Other sessions will offer strategies to address opioid prescribing, Medicare set-aside requirements, Americans with Disabilities Act mandates, and insurance arrangements.


The conference will also present several case studies including:

  • A look at the multidisciplinary approach applied by manufacturer Mohawk Industries to launch a health and safety program.
  • The strategies Columbus Consolidated Government employed to develop an award-winning return-to-work program.
  • How American Airlines fostered a claims-closure culture to resolve complex legacy claims.

Those are only a few of the topics employers and service providers will present at this year’s conference, recognized as  the workers’ comp industry’s must-attend event of the year.

The R&I Editorial Team may be reached at [email protected]
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Sponsored: Lexington Insurance

Sparking Innovation and Motivating Millennials

What started off as a one-off project for Lexington Insurance evolved into an annual program that sparks innovative solutions and helps develop millennial talent.
By: | October 3, 2016 • 5 min read

Two trends in the insurance industry, if they continue, could compromise its vitality in today’s fast-paced, technology-driven business world: slow innovation and a scarcity of millennial talent.

The quests to develop innovative solutions and services and to recruit young people to the field have raised concerns in the industry for several years, causing some insurers to think about how they will stay viable in the future when senior-level managers begin to retire.

But Lexington Insurance Company, a member of AIG, may have found a way to spark innovation that also engages millennial minds.

Innovation Boot Camp started three years ago as a one-off project meant to identify young, high-potential employees, give them exposure to senior management and evaluate their teamwork and leadership capabilities.

“The original concept was fairly straightforward. We would bring together a group of about 30 high potential employees for some semblance of team project work and it would allow management to gauge and assess talent,” said Matt Power, Executive Vice President, Head of Strategic Development, Lexington Insurance.

Little did he know how well the program would not only generate a plethora of innovative ideas that would drive the company forward, but also reinvigorate younger employees.

Lexington_SponsoredContent“The boot camps would be focused on innovation, with the idea that if we ended up with a concept or product that we could commercialize, then the boot camp would have been effectively self-funded. When they came back at the end of the 12 weeks, we were absolutely shocked because they produced about half a dozen products that have since been commercialized and are in some phase of being rolled out.”
— Matt Power, Executive Vice President, Head of Strategic Development, Lexington Insurance

New Ideas Emerge

The inaugural Innovation Boot Camp began with a two-day kick off meeting for participants— consisting of six teams with five or six participants. Each team was tasked with developing a business plan, and began to connect virtually over the next 12 weeks. The plan would culminate in a presentation to a senior management judging panel at the program’s conclusion.

“The boot camps would be focused on innovation, with the idea that if we ended up with a concept or product that we could commercialize, then the boot camp would have been effectively self-funded,” Power said. “When they came back at the end of the 12 weeks, we were absolutely shocked because they produced about half a dozen products that have since been commercialized and are in some phase of being rolled out.”

Power credits the program’s success in part to the participants’ youth. They were tuned in to different trends and issues than their more experienced counterparts.

Cyberbullying, for example, was a problem that didn’t exist for Power and his contemporaries as they grew up, but was salient for millennials. Based on the presentation of one group, Lexington developed coverage on their personalized portfolio for exposures associated with cyberbullying.

Likewise, “they educated us on the emergence of the craft brewing industry and how rapidly it was growing in the U.S.,” Power said. “That led to us launching a whole suite of products for craft brewers.”

Another team brought forth the concept of how rapid sequencing laser photography could be used to create a three-dimensional picture of a construction work site. That would allow contractors or claims managers to virtually walk through the site at a given point in the construction process to identify deviations from the original blueprint plans.

The images could memorialize the building process down to the millimeter, to every screw and wire. If a loss emerges later on due to a construction defect, the 3D map would be a valuable investigation tool.

Innovation Boot Camp proved so successful that Lexington expanded it to other arms of AIG all over the world.

“Suddenly we started getting calls from London, Copenhagen, Brazil,” Power said. “We were doing these programs for our global casualty team, for our lead attorneys in New York, for our financial lines group, and so on. We recently embarked on the 16th iteration of this program in London, with additional programs in the works.

“It’s a journey that has evolved from trying different things and not being afraid to fail, not being afraid to try new ways of thinking about the business.”


Engaging Millennial Minds

In addition to generating new product ideas, Innovation Boot Camp also engages younger employees more fully by offering the opportunity to make meaningful contributions to the company through independent work that requires some creative thinking.

Past participants are often great crusaders for the program.

“A program like IBC is something rarely seen at a large corporate conglomerate, and really a concept for new age startup companies,” said Alyson R. Jacobs, Vice President, Broker and Client Engagement Leader in AIG’s Energy & Construction Industry Segment. “But we were given a chance to work with people of all different professional backgrounds, and that environment unearthed concepts and solutions that have made a significant impact in the lives of our insureds and their employees.”

The chance to do work that makes a difference, both for the success of their company as well as the clients its serves, is what attracts millennial employees to the program and motivates them to devote their best effort to the project.

“Millennials want to be able to share their ideas and make meaningful contributions at work,” Power said. “Innovation Boot Camp has evolved into the perfect forum for that.”

David Kennedy, Esq., Product Development Manager for Lexington Insurance and former Coach for two Innovation Boot Camps, said the program engenders an “entrepreneurial spirit of developing something new, of applying analytical rigor to emerging risks to create unique and timely solutions for our clients and the marketplace.”

Exposure to senior executives doesn’t hurt either.

“It provided a platform for me to not just interact with our Senior Executive leadership but present a concept that could potentially be adopted by our company in the future,” said Ryan Pitterson, Assistant Vice President, AIG. “It helps to build your internal network, elevate your profile in the company and connects you with our client base as well.”

At a time when recent college graduates choose employers based on how much opportunity they’ll be given to have meaningful input — as well as opportunities for advancement — projects like Innovation Boot Camp could be the answer to the insurance industry’s struggle to pull in millennials.

“We give them the time, space and resources to create something new,” Power said. “When employee engagement is done right, it inspires passion and creativity.”

As multiple arms of AIG adopt Innovation Boot Camp around the globe, both the quantity and quality of new ideas are bound to flourish.

“The bottom line is, many heads are greater than one, and AIG has figured out how to leverage this. AIG hears their employees’ voices and enables those ideas to take our company into the future,” Jacobs said.

To learn more about Lexington Insurance, visit


This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with Lexington Insurance. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.

Lexington Insurance Company, an AIG Company, is the leading U.S.-based surplus lines insurer.
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