It’s All About Content

Sleeker. Bolder. More responsive. In a word - immersive.

A more immersive reading experience? We’re glad you asked. A cleaner layout and typographic design keeps your focus on the content. The “infinite scroll,” simplified navigation and Google search make finding interesting articles easier. And no matter your screen size – PC, tablet or phone – the site is optimized to ensure the same great experience.

The benefits of the site are mostly self-evident. But a few features are worth highlighting to help get you started:

Article Pages


Current Section: Displays the issue, topic, author or section you are currently viewing.

Content Ribbon: Lists all of the articles in the current section. Easily browse the articles and click on any tile to load that article into the infinite scroll.

Infinite Scroll: Read each article from top to bottom without having to click to continue. The next article loads automatically so you can continuously read/browse an entire issue or section – similar to how you read a print magazine.

Full Screen: Click the arrow to hide the content ribbon and create a clutter-free article reading experience. Also handy for smaller screens or tablets.

More Ways to Explore


Nav Bar: Click the gray bar to reveal several filters, sections and topics that tailor articles to your interests. 

Authors/Topics: Reading an article you like? Click on the author’s name to see all of their content or click on one of the topics to load that section.

Google Search: Still not finding what you want? The search bar slides out to help you find it.

Responsive Design (Mobile Optimized) 

The site utilizes a responsive design. That means the layout automatically adjusts to different screen sizes. You can see the technology in action by adjusting the size of your browser window. It’s pretty cool.

But responsive design is more than just a neat trick. It ensures that our new site looks great and works well on all screen sizes. Call us a website or, if you like, a web app – the site combines the benefits of the free and open web with the elegance of an application.


More to Come

But we are not done yet. The site enables us to integrate new content types into our stories. Over the next year, you will see more charts, graphs, infographics, videos, photos, etc.

Be sure to sign-up for one of our newsletters to stay abreast of all these developments as well as the latest articles and content we publish.

In the meantime, we would love to hear your feedback about the new site or anything else we do. Write to us at [email protected].

Aviation Woes

Coping with Cancellations

Could a weather-related insurance solution be designed to help airlines cope with cancellation losses?
By: | April 23, 2014 • 4 min read

Airlines typically can offset revenue losses for cancellations due to bad weather either by saving on fuel and salary costs or rerouting passengers on other flights, but this year’s revenue losses from the worst winter storm season in years might be too much for traditional measures.

At least one broker said the time may be right for airlines to consider crafting custom insurance programs to account for such devastating seasons.

For a good part of the country, including many parts of the Southeast, snow and ice storms have wreaked havoc on flight cancellations, with a mid-February storm being the worst of all. On Feb. 13, a snowstorm from Virginia to Maine caused airlines to scrub 7,561 U.S. flights, more than the 7,400 cancelled flights due to Hurricane Sandy, according to MasFlight, industry data tracker based in Bethesda, Md.


Roughly 100,000 flights have been canceled since Dec. 1, MasFlight said.

Just United, alone, the world’s second-largest airline, reported that it had cancelled 22,500 flights in January and February, 2014, according to Bloomberg. The airline’s completed regional flights was 87.1 percent, which was “an extraordinarily low level,” and almost 9 percentage points below its mainline operations, it reported.

And another potentially heavy snowfall was forecast for last weekend, from California to New England.

The sheer amount of cancellations this winter are likely straining airlines’ bottom lines, said Katie Connell, a spokeswoman for Airlines for America, a trade group for major U.S. airline companies.

“The airline industry’s fixed costs are high, therefore the majority of operating costs will still be incurred by airlines, even for canceled flights,” Connell wrote in an email. “If a flight is canceled due to weather, the only significant cost that the airline avoids is fuel; otherwise, it must still pay ownership costs for aircraft and ground equipment, maintenance costs and overhead and most crew costs. Extended storms and other sources of irregular operations are clear reminders of the industry’s operational and financial vulnerability to factors outside its control.”

Bob Mann, an independent airline analyst and consultant who is principal of R.W. Mann & Co. Inc. in Port Washington, N.Y., said that two-thirds of costs — fuel and labor — are short-term variable costs, but that fixed charges are “unfortunately incurred.” Airlines just typically absorb those costs.

“I am not aware of any airline that has considered taking out business interruption insurance for weather-related disruptions; it is simply a part of the business,” Mann said.

Chuck Cederroth, managing director at Aon Risk Solutions’ aviation practice, said carriers would probably not want to insure airlines against cancellations because airlines have control over whether a flight will be canceled, particularly if they don’t want to risk being fined up to $27,500 for each passenger by the Federal Aviation Administration when passengers are stuck on a tarmac for hours.

“How could an insurance product work when the insured is the one who controls the trigger?” Cederroth asked. “I think it would be a product that insurance companies would probably have a hard time providing.”

But Brad Meinhardt, U.S. aviation practice leader, for Arthur J. Gallagher & Co., said now may be the best time for airlines — and insurance carriers — to think about crafting a specialized insurance program to cover fluke years like this one.


“I would be stunned if this subject hasn’t made its way up into the C-suites of major and mid-sized airlines,” Meinhardt said. “When these events happen, people tend to look over their shoulder and ask if there is a solution for such events.”

Airlines often hedge losses from unknown variables such as varying fuel costs or interest rate fluctuations using derivatives, but those tools may not be enough for severe winters such as this year’s, he said. While products like business interruption insurance may not be used for airlines, they could look at weather-related insurance products that have very specific triggers.

For example, airlines could designate a period of time for such a “tough winter policy,” say from the period of November to March, in which they can manage cancellations due to 10 days of heavy snowfall, Meinhardt said. That amount could be designated their retention in such a policy, and anything in excess of the designated snowfall days could be a defined benefit that a carrier could pay if the policy is triggered. Possibly, the trigger would be inches of snowfall. “Custom solutions are the idea,” he said.

“Airlines are not likely buying any of these types of products now, but I think there’s probably some thinking along those lines right now as many might have to take losses as write-downs on their quarterly earnings and hope this doesn’t happen again,” he said. “There probably needs to be one airline making a trailblazing action on an insurance or derivative product — something that gets people talking about how to hedge against those losses in the future.”

Katie Kuehner-Hebert is a freelance writer based in California. She has more than two decades of journalism experience and expertise in financial writing. She can be reached at [email protected]
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Sponsored Content by MyPath

5 Steps for Insurance Firms to Recruit Better College Graduates

Connect with college graduates before they join the workforce to help steer them toward the insurance career path.
By: | December 1, 2015 • 4 min read

It’s no secret that most college students simply aren’t aware of insurance careers. Our own research* has found that only 2 percent of millennials consider themselves “very familiar” with the insurance industry, and fewer than 10 percent said they were interested in joining the profession.

That harsh reality means insurance employers can’t just post entry-level job openings online and wait for the applications to roll in — especially if they’re trying to attract the best and the brightest. You need to be proactive if you want to compete with industries that young people know much better.

One effective way firms can get a jump start on the competition is by introducing students to their organization before students graduate. Here are five steps to get started.

  1. Focus your efforts

With limited resources, you can make meaningful, personal connections at only so many colleges. For organizations that don’t have robust campus recruiting programs, that means first identifying your key targets to determine where to focus your efforts. For insurance organizations in particular, the first place you should be looking is at schools with established risk management and insurance (RMI) programs.

Nearly 40 colleges and universities offer undergraduate RMI-major programs, and many more offer RMI minors, graduate programs and individual classes, according to a 2014 study by St. John’s University and the International Insurance Society. Many of these schools are also MyPath partners, and you can learn more about them by visiting our site.

  1. Reach out

Yes, you can contact a college’s career center. Yes, you can have an engaging, dynamic post on the school’s job board. And yes, you can have an inviting informational table at schools’ career and internship fairs. All these official channels are great ways to catch the attention of students who are actively looking for jobs.

But there are other ways to reach prospective applicants, too. Check for business-focused student groups or clubs, especially Gamma Iota Sigma (GIS), the insurance, risk management and actuarial science organization. GIS has more than 65 chapters across the United States with ambitious students who are already familiar and involved with the insurance field. Find a chapter near you by visiting their website, and offer to send a guest speaker or host an informational lunch. (Trust us, no college students are turning down free food.)

  1. Use your connections

Chances are you already have some untapped recruitment resources in your ranks. Identify employees at your company who are alumni of the schools you’re targeting, especially recent grads. Encourage them to stay active in alumni groups and share news about job opportunities at your firm.

Internships are another great way to generate awareness of your company. They truly are the simplest win-win, because you get support for your team, the interns gain valuable professional experience, and there’s always the chance they’ll spread the word about your organization on campus. If you’re looking for high-caliber interns, you can become a MyPath partner and post your internships on our database for tens of thousands of users to find.

  1. Put your best foot forward

Make sure your company’s online presence and recruiting resources are as strong as they can be. Your company website should look inviting and provide easy access to your social media channels, and you need to be sure you have solid information on key websites like LinkedIn, Facebook, Glassdoor, Vault and others. If you’re really ambitious, look at creating dedicated channels on sites like YouTube. Basically, make it as easy as possible for potential applicants to find information about you.

Ideally, your social media presence should have a personal feel and give students an idea of what it’s really like to work for your company. As we know, careers in insurance organizations are often misrepresented, so it’s imperative to make that extra effort to show your workplace is rewarding and fulfilling.

  1. Rein in your strongest applicants

All these efforts are only half the battle. If the people you’re attracting really are talented, you’re probably competing with other organizations to get them. To hook them and reel them in, consider giving applicants some personal attention.

If you’re making an offer, specifically refer to topics discussed during the interview process or send a handwritten note. Millennials especially want to understand how they fit in to the mission of the organization and want to feel appreciated as a unique addition to the group. Some firms even ask the CEO or another exec to give the applicant a call extending a job offer. If you’ve done a good job up to that point, that applicant may actually become the CEO one day.

Want more ideas for recruiting young professionals? Visit the MyPath website to get more articles like this, including “How Employers Can Make Their Offices More Millennial Friendly” and “4 Myths About Millennials That Smart Employers Should Ignore.” You can also sign up to become a MyPath partner yourself to connect with millions of young people around the U.S.

*Research from The Griffith Insurance Education Foundation, “Millennial Generation Attitudes About Work and The Insurance Industry” (Malvern, Pa.: The Griffith Foundation, 2011).

This article was produced by MyPath and not the Risk & Insurance® editorial team.

MyPath is a collaborative industry-wide insurance and risk management initiative, powered by The Institutes, that is dedicated to educating students and young professionals about the insurance industry and its limitless career opportunities. Visit
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