2015 Risk All Star: Renee Crow

Playing the Part

When Renee Crow took a position at Kimpton Hotels and Restaurants, it’s fair to say that the company’s approach to risk management — specifically how employees should handle guest incidents to reduce claims — lacked focus.

Renee Crow Vice president, risk management Kimpton Hotels and Restaurants

Renee Crow
Vice President, Risk Management
Kimpton Hotels and Restaurants

“The company didn’t seem to have a handle around, ‘How do I say something to not get us in trouble?’ ” she said.

“How can we deal with the liability that we possibly assume when we just give the store away to the guests?”

What Crow has done is give that program focus and create so much employee engagement that she has the company calling for more. She’s doing it by having employees act out loss scenarios, to gain a better understanding of how their actions under pressure or in the case of an incident can have an impact on a customer’s inclination to litigate or take to social media to complain.

When Crow came on board, Kimpton, which prides itself on superior customer service, was facing a number of claims, some of them quite costly, stemming from employee interactions with customers.

Advertisement




Adding to the challenge is that Kimpton is a fast-growing company. When Crow joined eight years ago, the company had 24 properties. Now, it has more than 60.

To get employees to think differently about how they could both provide great customer service and protect the company’s bottom line, Crow instituted a training program that allowed employees to act out customer incident scenarios, drawn from actual company experiences, experiences that led to claims.

“If you want to change behavior in people you can’t put them in front of PowerPoint slides for three hours and say, ‘This is the way we want you to act.’ ” — Renee Crow, vice president, risk management, Kimpton Hotels

“I looked at all the incidents over time and selected those incidents that would have the most impact,” she said.
What she discovered was a bona fide way to reduce the company’s overall cost of risk. She also discovered something else.

“I have to tell you that all hospitality people are frustrated thespians. They are amazing,” Crow said.
As a part of the training, when the employees finish acting out the scenario, Crow tells them about the real-world result of the incident they just played out.

“Which ultimately is that something really bad happened,” she said. “We ended up with a large litigation or a very bad attorney demand because of the chain reaction of the events that occurred,” she added.

That helps employees really “get it,” she said, and embeds in them thought processes for how they might do things differently when there is an incident or customer complaint. The approach is far more effective than, say, sitting employees down in front of a slide presentation.

“If you want to change behavior in people you can’t put them in front of PowerPoint slides for three hours and say, ‘This is the way we want you to act,’ ” she said.

Advertisement




Crow is now conducting the training every 18 months at every Kimpton property. In fact, when we talked to her in early August, the managers of the company’s East Coast hotels had just been in touch with her to ask when she was coming back.

The coast-to-coast aspect of Crow’s work has an additional benefit. Crow can see incident trends that are occurring at, for example, West Coast hotels, and implement training at the East Coast properties in advance of that trend materializing.

And the company’s overall cost of risk? It’s been driven down 40 percent since Crow started this work.

_____________________________________________

R9-15-15p26_Intro_Allstar4-2.inddRisk All Stars stand out from their peers by overcoming challenges through exceptional problem solving, creativity, perseverance and/or passion.

See the complete list of 2015 Risk All Stars.

Share this article:

Infographic: The Risk List

6 Types of Employees at Risk in Growing Companies

Whether it's seasonal or shift workers, many factors combine to put growing companies in peril. Presented by Travelers.
By: | September 14, 2015 • 2 min read
TheRiskList_091515TheRiskList_091515 TheRiskList_091515

The Risk List is presented by:

RiskList_091515 TheRiskList_091515 TheRiskList_091515 TheRiskList_091515



The R&I Editorial Team may be reached at [email protected]
Share this article:

Sponsored Content: XL Catlin

Think You Don’t Need Environmental Insurance?

The risk of environmental damage is there no matter what business you're in.
By: | September 14, 2016 • 5 min read
XLCatlin_SponsoredContent

“I don’t work with hazardous materials.”

“My industry isn’t regulated by the EPA.”

“We have an environmental health and safety team, and a response plan in place.”

“We’ve never had an environmental loss.”

“I have coverage through my other general liability and property policies.”

These are the justifications clients most often give insurers for not procuring environmental insurance. For companies outside of sectors with obvious exposure — oil and gas, manufacturing, transportation — the risk of environmental damage may appear marginal and coverage unnecessary.

“Environmental insurance is not like every other insurance,” said Mary Ann Susavidge, Chief Underwriting Officer, Environmental, XL Catlin. “The exposure is unique for every operation and claims don’t happen often, so many businesses view coverage as a discretionary purchase. But the truth is that no one is immune to environmental liability risk.”

Every business needs to be aware of their environmental exposures. To do that, they need a partner with the experience to help them identify exposures and guide them through the remediation claims process after an incident. The environmental team at XL Catlin has been underwriting these risks for 30 years.

“Insureds might not experience this type of claim every day, but our environmental team does,” said Matt O’Malley, President, North America Environmental, XL Catlin. “We’ve seen what can happen if you’re not prepared.”

Susavidge and O’Malley debunked some of the common myths behind decisions to forego environmental coverage:

Myth: My business is not subject to environmental regulations.

Reality: Other regulators and business partners will require some degree of environmental protection.

Regulatory agencies like OSHA are more diligent than ever about indoor air quality and water systems testing after several outbreaks of Legionnaires disease.

“The regulators often set the trends in environmental claims,” Susavidge said. “In the real estate area it started with testing for radon, and now there’s more concern over mold and legionella.”

Multiple hotels have been forced to shut down after testing revealed legionella in their plumbing or cooling systems. In addition to remediation costs, business interruption losses can climb quickly.

For some industries, environmental insurance acts as a critical business enabler because investors require it. Many real estate developers, for example, are moving into urban areas where their clients want to live and work, but vacant lots are scarce. Those still available may be covering up an urban landfill or a brownfield.

“We’re able to provide expertise on those sites and the development risks so the contractor can get comfortable working on it. It’s about allowing our clients to stay relevant in their markets,” O’Malley said. “In this case, the developer is not an insured with a typical environmental exposure. But if there is a contaminant on the worksite, they could inadvertently disperse it. In a high-population urban area, the impact could be large.”

Banks also quite often require the coverage specifically because developers are turning to these locations with higher potential environmental risk.

“Though it’s not a legal requirement, insurance is a facilitator to the deal that developers really can’t operate without,” Susavidge said.

Myth: The small environmental exposure I have would be covered under other polices.

Reality: Environmental losses can result from exposure to off-site events and are excluded by many property and casualty policies.

Environmental risks on adjoining properties can lead to major third party losses. Vapor intrusion under the foundation of one property, for example, can unknowingly underlie the neighboring properties as well. The vapor intrusion can then seep into the surrounding properties, endangering employees and guests.

In other words, your neighbor’s environmental exposure may become your environmental exposure.

O’Malley described a claim in which a petroleum pipeline burst, affecting properties and natural resources 10 miles downstream even though the pipeline was shut off two minutes after the rupture. The energy company that owns the pipeline might have coverage, but what about the other impacted organizations? Many other property policies exclude environmental damage.

Sometimes the exposure is even more unexpected. In 2005, for example, a train carrying tons of chlorine gas crashed into a parked train set sitting in the yard of Avondale Mills — a South Carolina textile plant. The gas permanently damaged plant equipment and forced the operation to shut down.

“It’s not always obvious when you have an environmental exposure,” Susavidge said.

“When there is a big loss or a pattern of losses, the casualty market will typically move to exclude it,” said O’Malley. “And that’s where the environmental team looks for a solution. Environmental coverage has been developed to fill the gaps that other coverages won’t touch.”

Myth: We already have a thorough response plan if there is an incident.

Reality: Properly handling an environmental event requires experience and expertise.

In addition to coverage, risk managers need experience and expertise on their side when navigating environmental claims.

“For many of our clients, their first environmental claim is a very different experience because the claimant is not always a typical third party – it’s a government agency or some other organization that they lack experience with,” Susavidge said. “Our claims team is made up of attorneys that have specific domain experience litigating environmental claims issues.”

Beyond its legal staff, XL Catlin’s claims consulting team and risk engineers come with specialized expertise in environmental issues. 85 to 90 percent of the team members are former environmental engineers and scientists, civil engineers, chemists, and geologists.

“Handling environmental claims requires specialized expertise with contaminants and different types of pollution events,” O’Malley said. “That’s why our 30 years of experience makes a difference.”

Thirty years in the business also means 30 years of loss data.

“That informs us as a carrier how to provide the right types of services for the right clients,” Susavidge said. “It gives us insight into what our insureds are likely to experience and help us determine what support they need.”

Insureds also benefit from the relationships that XL Catlin has built in the industry over those 30 years. When the XL Catlin team is engaged following a covered pollution event, the XL Catlin claims team can deploy seasoned, experienced third party contractors that partner with the insured to address the spill and the potential reputational risk. And they receive guidance on communicating with regulatory bodies and following proper reporting procedures.

“The value of the policy goes beyond the words that are written,” O’Malley said. “It’s the service we provide to help clients get back on their feet, so they can focus on their business rather than the event itself.”

For more information on XL Catlin’s environmental coverage and services, visit http://xlcatlin.com/insurance/insurance-coverage/casualty-insurance.

The information contained herein is intended for informational purposes only. Insurance coverage in any particular case will depend upon the type of policy in effect, the terms, conditions and exclusions in any such policy, and the facts of each unique situation. No representation is made that any specific insurance coverage would apply in the circumstances outlined herein. Please refer to the individual policy forms for specific coverage details. XL Catlin, the XL Catlin logo and Make Your World Go are trademarks of XL Group Ltd companies. XL Catlin is the global brand used by XL Group Ltd’s (re)insurance subsidiaries. In the US, the insurance companies of XL Group Ltd are: Catlin Indemnity Company, Catlin Insurance Company, Inc., Catlin Specialty Insurance Company, Greenwich Insurance Company, Indian Harbor Insurance Company, XL Insurance America, Inc., and XL Specialty Insurance Company. Not all of the insurers do business in all jurisdictions nor is coverage available in all jurisdictions. Information accurate as of September 2016.

SponsoredContent

BrandStudioLogo

This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with XL Catlin. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.




Advertisement

XL Catlin. From insurance to reinsurance, a changing world needs new answers. We’re here to find them. With an incredible blend of people, products, services and technology, we have the power to find innovative, creative solutions to your risks — from the most familiar to the most complex.
Share this article: