Risk Management

The Profession

Q&A with Carolyn Snow, director of risk management for Humana and the 2014 RIMS President.
By: | March 3, 2014 • 3 min read
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R3-14p46_Profession.inddIn 2014, Risk & Insurance® is dedicating its back page to Q&As with risk management professionals. Our second installment is with Carolyn Snow, director of risk management for Humana.

R&I: What was your first job?

Property underwriter.

R&I: How did you come to work in risk management?

My employer was consolidating offices.I did not want to relocate again and an opportunity became available at Humana.

R&I: Who is your mentor and why?

In my career, Jim Bloom, the just-retired CFO of Humana; and from RIMS, former presidents Janice Ochenkowski and Scott Clark; and my fellow board member, Nowell Seaman.

R&I: What about this work do you find the most fulfilling or rewarding?

Having an opportunity to work with people at every level of my company, to continue to grow and learn new things, and meeting all of the great people connected to the risk management profession.

R&I: What is the risk management community doing right?

[It’s] doing a better job of proving our value to the success of our companies, and that we do more than manage insurance programs and losses.

R&I: What could the risk management community be doing a better job of?

Continuing to do what we are doing right, but to a bigger and broader audience.

R&I: What emerging commercial risk most concerns you?

The more sophisticated cyber attacks.

R&I: What have you accomplished that you are proudest of?

Raised a great daughter.

R&I: What is your favorite book or movie?

Favorite movie: 84 Charing Cross Road, with Anne Bancroft and Anthony Hopkins. It’s an old movie but [has a] timeless message of friendship. The book that made the greatest impression on me was The Diary of Anne Frank, which I read when I was about her age.

R&I: What is the most unusual/interesting place you have ever visited?

I love to travel, so it is usually the last place I visited. In the U.S., I love the great parks in Utah; and outside the U.S., my favorite place is Scotland.

R&I: What is the riskiest activity you ever engaged in?

A helicopter ride in Hawaii, which was to go over volcanoes. Helicopters do not glide but fall straight down, and I would never do that again.

R&I: If the world has a modern hero, who is it and why? 

I admire Angela Merkel as a world leader, and Melinda and Bill Gates for their work on behalf of children.

R&I: What do your friends and family think you do?

My husband knows, but my friends just know I work at Humana, so they think, “It is something to do with insurance.” They are envious, however, since they know I love my job.

R&I: What was the best location and year for the RIMS conference and why?

San Diego is always a personal favorite of mine. Location, location, location — and our members seem to love it too as we always get a great response.

R&I: What’s the best restaurant you’ve ever eaten at?

Trattori Ponte Vecchio, Florence, Italy.

R&I: What is your favorite drink?

I am well known for always having a Tab  available at all times. Otherwise, a nice glass of wine, but not chardonnay. I hate chardonnay.

R&I: What’s been the biggest change in the risk management and insurance industry since you’ve been in it?

The evolution of ERM/SRM for risk management and the sophistication of underwriters and products from the insurance industry.

R&I: Are you optimistic about the U.S. economy or pessimistic and why?

Optimistic most days — as I think we have tremendous resources in brain power in this country — but frustrated at the political gridlock.

The R&I Editorial Team may be reached at [email protected]
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Global Shipping

Full Speed Ahead

A dispute delaying Panama Canal construction was resolved, but further delays could be costly to shippers and exporters.
By: | March 25, 2014 • 3 min read
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Any further delays to widen the Panama Canal could have far-reaching cost implications for all parties involved in the construction project and the shipping companies and exporters who use the Canal, a marine risk expert warned.

The Panama Canal Authority (ACP) signed a deal this month to end a four-month dispute — and a two-week work stoppage — over $1.6 billion in cost overruns claimed by the Grupo Unido por el Canal consortium (GUPC) carrying out the work. The dispute had threatened to derail the whole project, which now is expected to cost nearly $7 billion.

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Under the terms of the agreement, the Authority and the Spanish-led construction consortium will each invest an extra $100 million in the project.

Zurich North America, which holds $400 million surety bond on the project, “worked diligently with the ACP and GUPC to reach an agreement on the matter and fortunately the two sides have had a successful negotiation,” said Michael Bond, head of surety, Zurich North America. “We congratulate both of them on effectively reaching a favorable outcome. Zurich was glad to have played a role in a solution that brought the project forward.”

When the Canal expansion is completed in December 2015, the new third lock will house 12 giant lock gates designed to allow larger cargo ships through, and double the shipping lane’s capacity.

But Douglas Sakamoto, class underwriter, marine, Liberty Specialty Markets, warned that any further interruptions could result in shipping delays, increased costs and lost shipping tolls.

“The forecast for work to be completed has changed from 2014 to 2015, which is still not a massive delay when compared to the dimension of the work and the expectation in terms of international trade turnaround,” Sakamoto said.

“However, a longer delay could impact several international trade industries since there are lots of related ongoing investments, such as work on several international ports to adapt them to the new vessels, and orders placed for the new-Panamax vessels.

“If the work can’t be completed for any reason and costs still continue increasing, there are a number of serious implications such as the termination of the agreement with the current consortium, and the bond policy may be required in order to provide the extra amount needed to complete the work.”

When done, the Panama Canal Authority is expected to double the $1 billion in revenue it currently receives from shipping tolls.

With more than 13,000 ships passing through the Canal every year, Sakamoto said, construction delays could mean restrictions in the amount of goods producers can export as well as increasing the time it takes to ship the goods.

He noted that producers of commodities, such as LNG, which are exported from the U.S. Gulf Coast to target markets like Asia and the west coast of Latin America could be affected.

In addition, grain producers in the Brazilian ports of Itaqui, Suape and Pecém would also lose out on shorter shipping times, he said.

Shipping companies that have invested heavily in new-Panamax vessels orders several years ago would similarly miss out on vital revenue, Sakamoto said.

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International port authorities that have poured vast amounts of money into developing their ports for larger vessels and cargo volumes would also be adversely affected, Sakamoto said.

Pressure to meet the new deadline for completion of 2015, he said, could also impact labor force costs and suppliers.

“The Panama Canal construction project has been highly debated,” said a spokesman for Allianz Global Corporate Specialty, “but it’s actually not unusual for a large construction project to run over/get delayed. In fact, that’s why with project cargo coverage, there is a particular element called ‘delay in start up’ protection to help mitigate that risk.”

Work on the Canal project is now 70 percent complete; however the delay has come at a considerable cost to Sacyr, the Spanish building company that is leading the consortium, which saw its share price drop 6.9 percent this month following a breakdown in initial talks.

Alex Wright is a U.K.-based business journalist, who previously was deputy business editor at The Royal Gazette in Bermuda. You can reach him at [email protected]
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Sponsored Content by IPS

Compounding: Is it Coming of Age?

Prescription drug compounding is beginning to turn a corner in managing chronic pain.
By: | April 28, 2016 • 5 min read
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The WC managed care market has generally viewed the treatment method of Rx compounding through the lens of its negative impact to cost for treating chronic pain without examining fully the opportunity to utilize “best practice” prescription compounds to help combat the opioid epidemic this nation faces. IPS stands on the front lines of this opioid battle every day making a difference for its clients.  

After a shaky start cost-wise, prescription drug compounding is turning the corner in managing chronic pain without the risk of opioid addiction. A push from forward-thinking states and workers’ compensation PBMs who have the networks and resources to manage it is helping, too.

Prescription drug compounding has been around for more than a decade, but after a rocky start (primarily in terms of cost), compounding is finally coming into its own as an effective chronic pain management strategy – and a worthy alternative for costly and dangerous opioids – in workers’ compensation.

According to Greg Todd, CEO and founder of Integrated Prescription Solutions Inc. (IPS), a Costa Mesa, Calif.-based pharmacy benefit manager (PBM) for the workers’ compensation and disability market, one reason compounding is beginning to hit its stride is because some states have enacted laws to manage it more effectively. Another is PBMs like IPS have stepped up and are now managing compound drugs in a much more proactive manner from an oversight perspective.

By definition, compounding is a practice through which a licensed pharmacist or physician (or, in the case of an outsourcing facility, a person under the supervision of a licensed pharmacist) combines, mixes, or alters ingredients of a drug to create a medication tailored to the needs of an individual patient.

During that decade, Todd explains, opioids have filled the chronic pain management needs gap, bringing with them an enormous amount of problems as the ensuing addiction epidemic sweeping the nation resulted in the proliferation and over-consumption of opioids – at a staggering cost to both the bottom line and society at large.

As an alternative, compounded topical cream formulations also offer strong chronic pain management but have limited side effects and require much reduced dosage amounts to achieve effective tissue level penetration. In fact, they have a very low systemic absorption rate.

Bottom line, compounding provides prescribers with an excellent alternative treatment modality for chronic pain patients, both early and late stage, Todd says.

Time for Compounding Consideration

IPS_SponsoredContentThat scenario sets up the perfect argument for compounding, because for one thing, doctors are seeking a new solution, with all the pressure and scrutiny they’re receiving when trying to solve people’s chronic pain problems using opioids.

Todd explains the best news about neuropathic pain treatment using compounded topical analgesic creams is the results are outstanding, both in terms of patient satisfaction in VAS pain reduction but also in reduction potentially dangerous side effects of opioids.

The main issue with some of the early topical creams created via compounding was their high costs. In the early years, compounding, which does not require FDA approval, had little oversight or controls in place. But in the past few years, the workers compensation industry began to take notice of the solid science. At the same time, medical providers also were seeing the same science and began writing more prescriptions for compounding – which also offers them a revenue stream.

This is where oversight and rigor on the part of a PBM can make a difference, Todd says.

“You don’t let that compounded drug get dispensed when you’re going to pay for it without having a chance to approve it,” Todd says.

Education is Critical

IPS_SponsoredContentAt the same time, there is the growing, and genuine, need to start educating the doctors, helping them understand how they can really deliver quality pain management to a patient without gouging the system. A good compounding specialty pharmacy network offering tight, strict rules is fundamental, Todd says. And that means one that really reaches out to work with the doctors that are writing the prescriptions. The idea is to ensure that the active ingredients being chosen aren’t the most expensive sub-components because that unnecessarily will drive the cost of overall compound “through the ceiling.”

IPS has been able to mitigate costs in the last couple years just by having good common sense approach and a lot of physician outreach. Working with DermaTran Health Solutions and its national network of compounding pharmacies, IPS has been successfully impacting the cost while not reducing the effectiveness of a compounded prescription.

In Colorado, which has cracked down on compounding profiteering, Legislative change demanded no compound could be more than $350.00 period. What is notable, in an 18-month window for one client in Colorado, IPS had 38 compound prescriptions come through the door and each had between 4 and 7 active ingredients. Through its physician education efforts, IPS brought all 38 prescriptions down 3 active ingredients or less. IPS also helped patients achieve therapeutic success (and with medical community acceptance). In that case, the cost of compound prescriptions was down to an average of $350, versus the industry average of $788. Nationwide IPS has reduced the average cost of a compound prescription to $478.00.

Todd says. “We’ve still got a way to go, but we’ve made amazing progress in just the past couple of years on the cost and effective use of compound prescriptions.”

For more information on how you can better manage your costs for compound prescriptions, please call IPS at 866-846-9279.

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This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with IPS. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.




Integrated Prescription Solutions (IPS) is a Pharmacy Benefit Management (PBM) and Ancillary Services partner to W/C and Auto (PIP) Insurance carriers, Self Insured Employers, and Third Party Administrators who specialize in Workers Compensation benefits management.
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