Risk Management

The Profession

Q&A with Kurt Leisure, vice president of risk services with The Cheesecake Factory Inc.
By: | February 18, 2014 • 4 min read
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R2-14p102_Profession.inddIn 2014, Risk & Insurance® will be featuring Q&As with risk management professionals. Our first installment is with Kurt Leisure, who serves as the vice president of risk services with The Cheesecake Factory Inc.

R&I: What was your first job?

I sold life and disability insurance as my first job. It was financially lucrative but the cold call sales were a challenge for me and I wanted to be on a different side of the business.

R&I: How did you come to work in risk management?

I was working in the benefits department of a large restaurant company (not The Cheesecake Factory) and was asked if I wanted to make sense out of the company’s workers’ compensation and liability claims. At the time, the company viewed these claims as an unmanageable cost of the business. I jumped into the claims to better understand what was driving them, then initiated safety programs to prevent the claims. There was an immediate impact and the company added risk management to my title. As the business grew, I eventually dropped my benefits responsibilities and focused on the risk side of the business.

R&I: What about the profession of risk management do you find the most fulfilling or rewarding? 

This industry brings new daily challenges and I am exposed to almost every part of our business because there is a certain level of risk in everything. With the push to technology, and the speed at which technology is advancing, it is a constant challenge to keep up with the new risks that are emerging in this area. I love the challenge and am very motivated by my desire to identify and mitigate risk.

R&I: What is the risk management community doing right? 

I have been in the risk management profession for 26 years and am excited to see this profession emerge as a recognized profession that companies value.

R&I: What could the risk management community be doing a better job of? 

There are not enough universities that offer risk management programs. This makes it difficult for the industry to recruit from colleges and universities because students have not been exposed to the profession as part of their curriculum.

R&I: What emerging commercial risk most concerns you? 

Cyber risk and the ability of businesses to protect the public’s confidential information.

R&I: Who is your mentor and why?

Matt Clark, senior vice president of Strategic Planning for The Cheesecake Factory Inc. He understands enterprise risk management and allows me the flexibility to apply innovation to my risk programs. This support and Matt’s strategic vision has allowed us to drive our results in a positive way.

R&I: What have you accomplished that you are proudest of? 

I love to drive innovation and constantly push my staff to develop new programs and “pioneer” a solution that no one has thought of. I am also very passionate about risk management and am very visible in the Los Angeles RIMS chapter as well as other industry risk management forums.

R&I: What do your friends and family think you do?

I have a 5- and 3-year-old that consistently ask me what flavor of cheesecake I baked. The rest of my family and friends love having me over so they can hear about the latest crazy claim I have been working on. Most people who know me have a general understanding of what I do, but have no idea how many different pieces of the job there are.

R&I: What is your favorite book or movie? 

My current favorite book is called “Start With Why” by Simon Sinek. I love reading about great companies and leaders and what allows these companies to survive over time. The Cheesecake Factory falls into this category and our leadership team consistently understands why we exist and what place we have in the restaurant industry.

R&I: What is the most unusual/interesting place you have ever visited? 

The Crater Lake area in Southern Oregon is fascinating to me. It is the deepest lake in Oregon and not a spot that a lot of people have visited.

R&I: What is the riskiest activity you ever engaged in?

On my 40th birthday I rode a mountain bike down Mammoth Mountain (in the summer) with absolutely no safety gear at all — it was a spontaneous adventure. I ended up hitting a non-visible tree stump and cracked some ribs. I don’t always practice what I preach.

R&I: If the world has a modern hero, who is it and why? 

Jeff Bezos, the founder of Amazon. He launched e-commerce and has truly changed the way consumers shop.

The R&I Editorial Team may be reached at [email protected]
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Aviation Woes

Coping with Cancellations

Could a weather-related insurance solution be designed to help airlines cope with cancellation losses?
By: | April 23, 2014 • 4 min read
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Airlines typically can offset revenue losses for cancellations due to bad weather either by saving on fuel and salary costs or rerouting passengers on other flights, but this year’s revenue losses from the worst winter storm season in years might be too much for traditional measures.

At least one broker said the time may be right for airlines to consider crafting custom insurance programs to account for such devastating seasons.

For a good part of the country, including many parts of the Southeast, snow and ice storms have wreaked havoc on flight cancellations, with a mid-February storm being the worst of all. On Feb. 13, a snowstorm from Virginia to Maine caused airlines to scrub 7,561 U.S. flights, more than the 7,400 cancelled flights due to Hurricane Sandy, according to MasFlight, industry data tracker based in Bethesda, Md.

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Roughly 100,000 flights have been canceled since Dec. 1, MasFlight said.

Just United, alone, the world’s second-largest airline, reported that it had cancelled 22,500 flights in January and February, 2014, according to Bloomberg. The airline’s completed regional flights was 87.1 percent, which was “an extraordinarily low level,” and almost 9 percentage points below its mainline operations, it reported.

And another potentially heavy snowfall was forecast for last weekend, from California to New England.

The sheer amount of cancellations this winter are likely straining airlines’ bottom lines, said Katie Connell, a spokeswoman for Airlines for America, a trade group for major U.S. airline companies.

“The airline industry’s fixed costs are high, therefore the majority of operating costs will still be incurred by airlines, even for canceled flights,” Connell wrote in an email. “If a flight is canceled due to weather, the only significant cost that the airline avoids is fuel; otherwise, it must still pay ownership costs for aircraft and ground equipment, maintenance costs and overhead and most crew costs. Extended storms and other sources of irregular operations are clear reminders of the industry’s operational and financial vulnerability to factors outside its control.”

Bob Mann, an independent airline analyst and consultant who is principal of R.W. Mann & Co. Inc. in Port Washington, N.Y., said that two-thirds of costs — fuel and labor — are short-term variable costs, but that fixed charges are “unfortunately incurred.” Airlines just typically absorb those costs.

“I am not aware of any airline that has considered taking out business interruption insurance for weather-related disruptions; it is simply a part of the business,” Mann said.

Chuck Cederroth, managing director at Aon Risk Solutions’ aviation practice, said carriers would probably not want to insure airlines against cancellations because airlines have control over whether a flight will be canceled, particularly if they don’t want to risk being fined up to $27,500 for each passenger by the Federal Aviation Administration when passengers are stuck on a tarmac for hours.

“How could an insurance product work when the insured is the one who controls the trigger?” Cederroth asked. “I think it would be a product that insurance companies would probably have a hard time providing.”

But Brad Meinhardt, U.S. aviation practice leader, for Arthur J. Gallagher & Co., said now may be the best time for airlines — and insurance carriers — to think about crafting a specialized insurance program to cover fluke years like this one.

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“I would be stunned if this subject hasn’t made its way up into the C-suites of major and mid-sized airlines,” Meinhardt said. “When these events happen, people tend to look over their shoulder and ask if there is a solution for such events.”

Airlines often hedge losses from unknown variables such as varying fuel costs or interest rate fluctuations using derivatives, but those tools may not be enough for severe winters such as this year’s, he said. While products like business interruption insurance may not be used for airlines, they could look at weather-related insurance products that have very specific triggers.

For example, airlines could designate a period of time for such a “tough winter policy,” say from the period of November to March, in which they can manage cancellations due to 10 days of heavy snowfall, Meinhardt said. That amount could be designated their retention in such a policy, and anything in excess of the designated snowfall days could be a defined benefit that a carrier could pay if the policy is triggered. Possibly, the trigger would be inches of snowfall. “Custom solutions are the idea,” he said.

“Airlines are not likely buying any of these types of products now, but I think there’s probably some thinking along those lines right now as many might have to take losses as write-downs on their quarterly earnings and hope this doesn’t happen again,” he said. “There probably needs to be one airline making a trailblazing action on an insurance or derivative product — something that gets people talking about how to hedge against those losses in the future.”

Katie Kuehner-Hebert is a freelance writer based in California. She has more than two decades of journalism experience and expertise in financial writing. She can be reached at [email protected]
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Sponsored: Healthcare Solutions

Specialty Drugs Show No Signs of Slowing Down

The emergence of specialty drugs in the workers' comp market comes with a new set of complexities and a hefty price tag.
By: | August 31, 2015 • 4 min read
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A decade ago, high-cost specialty drugs were commonly referred to as “injectable drugs” and were used to treat conditions not typically covered in workers’ compensation, such as cancer, rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis.

“Today, however, new specialty drugs are emerging that will be used to treat other chronic and inflammatory conditions,” said Joe Boures, president and CEO of Healthcare Solutions, an Optum company providing specialized pharmacy benefit management services to the workers’ compensation market.

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Joe Boures, President and CEO, Healthcare Solutions

“Payers in the workers’ comp market are just beginning to feel the cost impact of greater utilization of these drugs, which come with expensive price tags.”

Specialty drugs are often manufactured using biologic rather than chemical methods, and they are no longer just administered by injections. New specialty drugs can also be inhaled or taken orally, likely contributing to the rise in their utilization.

“There isn’t a standard definition of specialty drugs, but they are generally defined as being complex to manufacture, costly, require specialty handling and distribution, and they difficult for patients to take without ongoing clinical support or may require administration by a health care provider,” said Boures.

In 2014, more than a quarter of all new therapies that the FDA approved were through its biologics division. Biologics, and similar therapies, are representative of a future trend in prescription drug spend.

“As the fastest growing costs in health care today, specialty drugs have the potential to change the way prescription benefits are provided in the future,” said Jim Andrews, executive vice president of pharmacy for Healthcare Solutions.

Workers’ Compensation payers may not recognize how specialty drugs are affecting their drug spend.

Specialty drugs like Enbrel®, Humira® and Synvisc® can be processed in conjunction with other medical procedures and, therefore, not recognized by payers as a pharmacy expense.

This leaves payers with little visibility into the costs of these medications within their book of business and a lack of tools to control these costs.

Due to the high costs of specialty medications, special due diligence should be utilized when claimants receive these medications, up to and including utilization review, said Andrews.

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Jim Andrews, Executive Vice President of Pharmacy, Healthcare Solutions

“Healthcare Solutions recommends that claimants using specialty drugs are monitored for proper medication handling and that the medication is administered appropriately, as well as monitoring the claimant to determine whether the medication is having its desired results and if there are any side effects,” he said.

“At $1,000 per pill for some of these specialty medications, making sure a claimant can tolerate the side effects becomes vital to making sure the claimant achieves the desired outcomes.”

Hepatitis C drugs have made their way to the workers’ compensation market, largely through coverage of healthcare workers, who have exposure to the disease.

“Traditional drug treatments that began in the 1990’s had a success rate of 6% and costs ranging from $1,800 to over $88,000,” said Andrews.

“The new Hepatitis C specialty medications have a treatment success rate of 94-100%, but cost between $90,000 and $226,000.”

Although the new treatments include higher drug costs, the payer’s overall medical costs may actually decrease if the Hep C patient would have required a liver transplant as part of the course of treatment without the drugs.

While the release of new Hepatitis C medications in 2014 demonstrated the potential impact specialty medications can have on workers’ compensation payers, there are some specialty medications under development that target more common conditions in workers’ compensation.

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Pfizer Inc. and Eli Lilly and Company are currently developing tanezumab, a new, non-narcotic medication to treat chronic pain, which is common in workers’ compensation claims.

Tanezumab has demonstrated benefits of reducing pain in clinical trials and may provide non-addictive pain relief to claimants in the future.  This may change how pain management is treated in the future.

Healthcare Solutions has a specialty medication program that provides payers discounted rates and management oversight of claimants receiving specialty medications.

Through the paper bill process, Healthcare Solutions aids payers in identifying specialty drugs and works with adjusters and physicians to move claimants into the specialty network.

A central feature of the program is that claimants are assigned to a clinical pharmacist or a registered nurse with specialty pharmacy training for consistent care with one-on-one consultations and ongoing case management.

The program provides patients with education and counseling, guidance on symptoms related to their medical conditions and drug side effects, proactive intervention for medication non-adherence, and prospective refill reminder and follow-up calls.

“The goal is to improve patient outcomes and reduce total costs of care,” said Boures.

This article was produced by Healthcare Solutions and not the Risk & Insurance® editorial team.



Healthcare Solutions serves as a health services company delivering integrated solutions to the property and casualty markets, specializing in workers’ compensation and auto liability/PIP.
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