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Risk Insiders

The Risk & Insurance website is also a self-publishing platform for select risk managers and industry experts.
By: | April 1, 2014

Risk Insiders are an unrivaled group of leading executives focused on the topic of Risk. They share their insights and opinions – and from time to time their pet peeves and gripes – on the Risk & Insurance website.

Each Risk Insider is invited to publish based on their expertise, passion and/or the quality of their writing. The only rules are no selling and no negative competitor mentions.

The topic of Risk is very broad and very complex. By inviting leading industry experts to share their insights we hope to provide a more complete perspective for our readers.

Selection Criteria

Risk Insiders are considered editorial contributors. As such, we are looking for individuals who want to publish their ideas, opinions or insights. Assistance from PR is great but we are not looking for ghost-written articles or corporate marketing perspectives.

Our primary target participants are Risk Managers, CFOs, Workers’ Comp Managers and other professionals responsible for risk mitigation for their companies.

Structure

Risk Insiders are free to write about any event, trend, opinion or other topic that is relevant to risk management or the insurance industry. There are no schedules or deadlines, write when you have something to say. Articles should be concise yet complete.

Some additional guidelines include:

    • Do your own writing (review and editing by colleagues is fine).
    • Original submissions only.
    • Publish 2 times a year, minimum.
    • Write from your own perspective, not your firm’s.
    • Avoid heavy jargon or corporate-speak.
    • Expressing complexity does not provide clarity. Keep it simple.
    • No selling.
    • No competitor put-downs.
    • Be concise but complete. 500 words max.
    • Pictures, graphics, videos, etc. are encouraged but not required.

How to apply

For more information and an application please contact us [email protected]

Matthew Kahn is the Publisher and Executive Editor of Risk & Insurance. He manages the editorial and sales teams as well as develops new content and platforms. His best risk management lessons come from his frequent aviation experiences as a pilot. Matthew can be reached at [email protected]
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Risk Insider: Zachary Gifford

Stay True, Be Kind

By: | November 16, 2016 • 2 min read
Zachary Gifford is Director, Systemwide Risk Management with the California State University – Office of the Chancellor. He also is active in risk management organizations such as PARMA, PRIMA and RIMS. He can be reached at [email protected]
Topics: Risk Insider

Depending on one’s point-of-view, this past election appears to have caused a great amount of anxiety, vitriol and perhaps evidence of an electorate who made their choices (regardless of party) based on their heart and not on reliable nonpartisan evaluations, analytics or fact checking.

“I heard it on talk radio” or “saw it on a blog” are generally not the best sources of dispassionate and accurate information. In this election, that appeared to be the overwhelming source of ‘information’ used by the young, old, male, female, Republican, Democrat, etc.

Enterprise risk management gurus or ISO 31000 disciples must be scratching their heads. Can one imagine assessing a risk management endeavor in the same manner a large percentage of the electorate evaluated one of the ultimate risk assessments?

With the above said, and when there appears to be a period of great change at the federal level, we need to remind ourselves that the Constitution has the built-in ability to “pump the breaks,” most namely through the separation of powers. Our founders built in safety valves to protect us from demagoguery, fascism and oligarchy.

From a risk management perspective we ask the question: “What does this historical election mean to the profession, our organizations and ourselves?”

From a risk management perspective we ask the question: “What does this historical election mean to the profession, our organizations and ourselves?”

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As to the profession and our organizations, the answers are likely as plentiful as there are questions.

The risk manager for a mining, petroleum or pharmaceutical operation might be doing handsprings of joy at this moment.

Conversely, many working for governmental entities, especially those providing regulatory oversight or “services,” clean energy or the media, might be ingesting large quantities of antacids this week. Cherry smoothie flavor is my favorite.

One cannot think holistically without considering how such change affects one’s self. Without ranting about personal beliefs, all people should be able to agree that we want a president of the United States (and congress I suspect … ) to be successful, visionary and do well for the country.

Further, we do not have to respect the individual in the position; however, we must respect the position and the democratic values of our country. The ease of the transition of power is a good example of why we are blessed to live in the United State.

So let’s keep our chins up or our celebrations of new-found power humble and realize we are citizens first and then Democrat, Republican or other. Together, common ground can be found, and if not, we all get another bite of the apple in two and then four years hence.

Stay true and be kind to one another.

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Sponsored Content by Nationwide

Hot Hacks That Leave You Cold

Cyber risk managers look at the latest in breaches and the future of cyber liability.
By: | December 1, 2016 • 5 min read

Nationwide_SponsoredContent_1016Thousands of dollars lost at the blink of an eye, and systems shut down for weeks. It might sound like something out of a movie, but it’s becoming more and more of a reality thanks to modern hackers. As technology evolves and becomes more sophisticated, so do the occurrence of cyber breaches.

“The more we rely on technology, the more everything becomes interconnected,” said Jackie Lee, associate vice president, Cyber Liability at Nationwide. “We are in an age where our car is a giant computer, and we can turn on our air conditioners with our phones. Everyone holds data. It’s everywhere.”

Phishing Out Fraud

According to Lee, phishing is on the rise as one of the most common forms of cyber attacks. What used to be easy to identify as fraudulent has become harder to distinguish. Gone are the days of the emails from the Nigerian prince, which have been replaced with much more sophisticated—and tricky—techniques that could extort millions.

“A typical phishing email is much more legitimate and plausible,” Lee said. “It could be an email appearing to be from human resources at annual benefits enrollment or it could be a seemingly authentic message from the CFO asking to release an invoice.”

According to Lee, the root of phishing is behavior and analytics. “Hackers can pick out so much from a person’s behavior, whether it’s a key word in an engagement survey or certain times when they are logging onto VPN.”

On the flip side, behavior also helps determine the best course of action to prevent phishing.

“When we send an exercise email to test how associates respond to phishing, we monitor who has clicked the first round, then a second round,” she said. “We look at repeat offenders and also determine if there is one exercise that is more susceptible. Once we understand that, we can take the right steps to make sure employees are trained to be more aware and recognize a potentially fraudulent email.”

Lee stressed that phishing can affect employees at all levels.

“When the exercise is sent out, we find that 20 percent of the opens are from employees at the executive level,” she said. “It’s just as important they are taking the right steps to ensure they are practicing what they are preaching.”

Locking Down Ransomware

Nationwide_SponsoredContent_1016Another hot hacking ploy is ransomware, a type of property-related cyber attack that prevents or limits users from accessing their system unless a ransom is paid. The average ransom request for a business is around $10,000. According to the FBI, there were 2,400 ransomware complaints in 2015, resulting in total estimated losses of more than $24 million. These threats are expected to increase by 300% this year alone.

“These events are happening, and businesses aren’t reporting them,” Lee said.

In the last five years, government entities saw the largest amount of ransomware attacks. Lee added that another popular target is hospitals.

After a recent cyber attack, a hospital in Los Angeles was without its crucial computer programs until it paid the hackers $17,000 to restore its systems.

Lee said there is beginning to be more industry-wide awareness around ransomware, and many healthcare organizations are starting to buy cyber insurance and are taking steps to safeguard their electronic files.

“A hospital holds an enormous amount of data, but there is so much more at stake than just the computer systems,” Lee said. “All their medical systems are technology-based. To lose those would be catastrophic.”

And though not all situations are life-or-death, Lee does emphasize that any kind of property loss could be crippling. “On a granular scale, you look at everything from your car to your security system. All data storage points could be controlled and compromised at some point.”

The Future of Cyber Liability

According to Lee, the Cyber product, which is still in its infancy, is poised to affect every line of business. She foresees underwriting offering more expertise in crime and becoming more segmented into areas of engineering, property, and automotive to address ongoing growing concerns.”

“Cyber coverage will become more than a one-dimensional product,” she said. “I see a large gap in coverage. Consistency is evolving, and as technology evolves, we are beginning to touch other lines. It’s no longer about if a breach will happen. It’s when.”

About Nationwide’s Cyber Solutions

Nationwide’s cyber liability coverage includes a service-based solution that helps mitigate losses. Whether it’s loss prevention resources, breach response and remediation expertise, or an experienced claim team, Nationwide’s comprehensive package of services will complement and enhance an organization’s cyber risk profile.

Nationwide currently offers up to $15 million in limits for Network Security, Data Privacy, Technology E&O, and First Party Business Interruption.

Nationwide_SponsoredContent_1016
Products underwritten by Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company and Affiliated Companies. Not all Nationwide affiliated companies are mutual companies, and not all Nationwide members are insured by a mutual company. Subject to underwriting guidelines, review, and approval. Products and discounts not available to all persons in all states. Home Office: One Nationwide Plaza, Columbus, OH. Nationwide, the Nationwide N and Eagle, and other marks displayed on this page are service marks of Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company, unless otherwise disclosed. © 2016 Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company.

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This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with Nationwide. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.




Nationwide, a Fortune 100 company, is one of the largest and strongest diversified insurance and financial services organizations in the U.S. and is rated A+ by both A.M. Best and Standard & Poor’s.
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