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Risk Insiders

The Risk & Insurance website is also a self-publishing platform for select risk managers and industry experts.
By: | April 1, 2014

Risk Insiders are an unrivaled group of leading executives focused on the topic of Risk. They share their insights and opinions – and from time to time their pet peeves and gripes – on the Risk & Insurance website.

Each Risk Insider is invited to publish based on their expertise, passion and/or the quality of their writing. The only rules are no selling and no negative competitor mentions.

The topic of Risk is very broad and very complex. By inviting leading industry experts to share their insights we hope to provide a more complete perspective for our readers.

Selection Criteria

Risk Insiders are considered editorial contributors. As such, we are looking for individuals who want to publish their ideas, opinions or insights. Assistance from PR is great but we are not looking for ghost-written articles or corporate marketing perspectives.

Our primary target participants are Risk Managers, CFOs, Workers’ Comp Managers and other professionals responsible for risk mitigation for their companies.

Structure

Risk Insiders are free to write about any event, trend, opinion or other topic that is relevant to risk management or the insurance industry. There are no schedules or deadlines, write when you have something to say. Articles should be concise yet complete.

Some additional guidelines include:

    • Do your own writing (review and editing by colleagues is fine).
    • Original submissions only.
    • Publish 2 times a year, minimum.
    • Write from your own perspective, not your firm’s.
    • Avoid heavy jargon or corporate-speak.
    • Expressing complexity does not provide clarity. Keep it simple.
    • No selling.
    • No competitor put-downs.
    • Be concise but complete. 500 words max.
    • Pictures, graphics, videos, etc. are encouraged but not required.

How to apply

For more information and an application please contact us via riskletters@lrp.com.

Matthew Kahn is the Publisher and Executive Editor of Risk & Insurance. He manages the editorial and sales teams as well as develops new content and platforms. His best risk management lessons come from his frequent aviation experiences as a pilot. Matthew can be reached at mkahn@lrp.com.
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Risk Insider: Dan Holden

Do Your Homework

By: | September 19, 2014 • 3 min read
Dan Holden is Manager of Corporate Risk & Insurance for Daimler Trucks North America (formerly “Freightliner”). He manages the risk management program in the U.S., Canada and Mexico. He can be reached at daniel.holden@daimler.com.

My years reviewing claims files drives me to the following conclusion: unless the employer is prepared, they’re wasting their time sitting through a workers’ comp file review.

While it seems like common sense, you’d be surprised how many employers don’t do their pre-work. Many times I’ve seen an employer sitting in the meeting nodding approvingly while the examiner provides a lackluster or imprecise update.

The employers – not being experts nor adequately prepared – don’t know the difference. And because they allowed themselves to be bamboozled, the file review is basically for naught.

I’m not saying file reviews are total rubbish. The mere fact that you requested the file review shows you are at least interested and will motivate the examiners to update their files.

But a file review will only scratch the surface. You might as well rename the file review, “Tell-me-what- you-want-me-to-know-in-3-minutes-or-less.”

I always advocate for an actual file audit on occasion to supplement your quarterly file reviews on all high value/high exposure cases. When it comes to a file audit, there’s no place to hide. Stone after stone will be unturned, so no doubt will remain as to whether the file was handled properly.

Often what the examiner tells you – and what the file ultimately reveals – are completely different. This isn’t a way to “catch” the examiner slacking, but rather to find out if your money is well-spent on that particular examiner, or more importantly, on that third-party administrator or insurance carrier.

I always advocate for an actual file audit on occasion to supplement your quarterly file reviews on all high value/high exposure cases.

So what constitutes “pre-work?”

It all boils down to how much you know about the injured worker. Do you know his diagnosis and the effectiveness of the treatment regime? The treating physician? What’s the return-to-work situation? Claimant attorney? Employee’s work history? Personnel history? Medical history?

Did the examiner establish a plan of action and stick to it? Did he share that plan with you prior to the review? Most importantly, did the examiner continually move forward in regards to file management and expedition to closure?

Some employers would say, “why would I need to know all that when the file review will tell me everything I need to know?” If that’s the case, I’d suggest you go back and read the first paragraph. An employer can’t be an active participant if they don’t know what they’re dealing with.

You must also remember you’re most likely sharing the examiner with several other employers, and the examiner only has so many hours in a day. His/her time will be focused on the employers who either squawk the most, or (and this is crucial) closely follow their files.

Disinterested employers will always fall to the wayside. And, yes, it will take time to keep up to speed on the claims. But it’ll pay dividends when it’s time for the file review because you’ll be a functioning part of the decision-making.

So be interested. Be involved. And do you pre-work. If you’re not prepared, it’s pretty easy for an examiner to gloss over prior missteps.

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Sponsored: Lexington Insurance

The Re-Invention of American Healthcare

Healthcare industry changes bring risks and opportunities.
By: | September 15, 2014 • 5 min read
SponsoredContent_Lex

Consolidation among healthcare providers continues at a torrid pace.

A multitude of factors are driving this consolidation, including the Affordable Care Act compliance, growing costs and the ever-greater complexity of health insurance reimbursements. After several years of purchasing individual practices and regional hospital systems, the emergence of the mega-hospital system is now clear.

“Every month, one of our clients is either being bought or buying someone — and the M&A activity shows no signs of slowing down,” said Brenda Osborne, executive vice president at Lexington Insurance Co.

This dramatic change in the landscape of healthcare providers is soon to be matched by equally significant changes in patient behavior. Motivated by growing out-of-pocket costs and empowered with new sources of information, the emergence of a “healthcare consumer” is on the horizon.

Price, service, reputation and, ultimately, value are soon to be important factors for patients making healthcare decisions.

Such significant changes bring with them new and challenging risks.

Physician integration

Although physicians traditionally started their own practices or joined medical groups, the current climate is quite the opposite. Doctors are now seeking out employment by health systems. Wages are guaranteed, hours are more stable, vacations are easier to take, and the burdens of running a business are gone.

“It’s a lot more of a desirable lifestyle, particularly for the younger generation,” said Osborne.

Brenda Osborne discusses the changing healthcare environment and the risks and opportunities to come.

Given the strategic importance of successfully integrating acquired practices into a larger healthcare system, hospitals are rightfully focused on how best to keep doctors happy, motivated and focused on patient safety.

A key issue that many hospitals struggle with is how to provide effective liability insurance for their doctors. Physicians who previously owned their practice are accustomed to a certain type of coverage and they expect that coverage to continue.

Even when operators find comparable liability insurance solutions for their doctors, getting buy-in from their staff is often an additional hurdle to overcome.

“Physicians listen to two things — physician leaders and data,” said Osborne. “That’s why Lexington provides assessments that utilize deep data analysis, combined with providing insights from leading doctors to help explain trends and best practices.

“In addition, utilizing benchmarks against peers helps to identify gaps in best practices. It’s a very powerful approach that speaks to doctors in a way that will help them improve their risk.”

Focusing on the “continuum of care”

There’s been a fundamental shift in how healthcare providers care for patients: Treatment is becoming more focused on a patient’s overall health status and related needs.

SponsoredContent_LexA cancer patient, for example, should have doctors in a number of specialties communicating and working together toward a positive patient outcome. But that means a change in thinking: Physicians need to work collaboratively with one another — not easy for individuals or groups that are used to being independent. Healthcare is a team sport.

“If there isn’t strong communication, strong leadership, and the recognition of proper treatment procedures between physicians, healthcare providers can increase the risk of error,” said Osborne. “The provider has got to treat the whole patient rather than each individual condition.”

That coordination must extend from inpatient to outpatient, especially since the ACA has led to a rapid increase in patients being treated at outpatient clinics, or via home health or telehealth to reduce the cost of inpatient care

“Home health is going be a growing area in the future,” Osborne continued. “Telehealth will become an effective and efficient way of managing and treating patients in their home. A patient might have a nurse come in and help the healthcare provider communicate with a physician through an iPad or computer. The nurse can also convey assessment findings to the physician.”

Metrics matter more than ever

Patients have not always thought of themselves as healthcare consumers, but that’s changing dramatically as they pay more out of pocket for their own healthcare. At the same time, there’s an increase in metrics and data available to the public — and healthcare consumers are drawing upon those metrics more and more when making choices that affect their health.

SponsoredContent_Lexington“Consumers are going to start measuring physicians against physicians, healthcare systems against healthcare systems. That competition will force everyone to improve the quality of care.”
– Brenda Osborne, Executive Vice President, Lexington Insurance

Think about all the research a consumer does before buying a car. Which dealership has the best price? Who provides the best service? Who’s offering the best financing deal?

“Do patients do that with physicians? No,” said Osborne. “Patients choose physicians through referrals from friends or health plans with minimal information. Patients may be putting their lives in the physicians’ hands and not know their track record.

That’s all going to change as patients’ use of data becomes more widespread. There are many web based resources to find information on physicians.

“Consumers are going to start measuring physicians against physicians, healthcare systems against healthcare systems,” said Osborne. “That competition will force everyone to improve the quality of care.”

Effective solutions are driven by expertise and vision

The rapidly evolving healthcare space requires all healthcare providers to find ways to cut costs and focus on patient safety. Lexington Insurance, long known as the leading innovative and nimble specialty insurer, is at the forefront in providing clients cutting-edge tools to help reduce costs and healthcare exposures.

These tools include:

  • Office Practice Risk Assessment: To support clients as they acquire physician practices, Lexington developed an office practice assessment tool which provides a broad, comprehensive evaluation of operational practices that may impact risk. The resulting report, complete with charts, graphs and insights, includes recommendations that can help physicians reduce risk related to such issues as telephone triage, lab results follow-up and medication management. .
  • Best Practice Assessments: High risk clinical areas such as emergency departments (ED) and obstetrics (OB) can benefit significantly from external, objective, evidence-based assessments to identify gaps and assure compliance with best practices. In addition to ED and OB, Lexington can provide a BPA for peri-operative care, prevention of healthcare-acquired infections, and nursing homes. All assessments result in a comprehensive report with recommendations for improvement and resources along with consultative assistance and support. .
  • Continuing Education: In an effort to improve knowledge, decrease potential risk and support healthcare providers in the use the most current tools and techniques, Lexington provides Continuing Medical Education credits at no cost to hospitals or their physicians.
  • Targeting the Healthcare Consumer: With Medicare reimbursement impacted by patient-satisfaction surveys, assuring a positive patient experience is more critical than ever. Lexington helps hospitals understand and improve the patient experience so they can continue to earn the trust of healthcare consumers while preserving their good reputation. .

To learn more about Lexington Insurance’s scope and depth of the patient safety consulting products and services healthcare solutions, interested brokers may visit their website.

This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with Lexington Insurance. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.

Lexington Insurance Company, an AIG Company, is the leading U.S.-based surplus lines insurer.
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