Crisis Management

Target as Target

Risk experts grade Target's efforts to manage the reputation damage caused by the data breach.
By: | February 3, 2014 • 4 min read
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After fumbling its initial response to a massive data breach, Target Corp. has rebounded, according to experts in crisis management.

However, they said, the retailer still faces challenges in regaining consumer confidence, especially among people directly harmed by the cyber attack, which struck at the height of the holiday shopping season.

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In late November and early December, malware lodged in the retailer’s point-of-sale system siphoned off account and personal information for up to 110 million customers. But Minneapolis-based Target is not the only company that may have been struck. Luxury retailer Neiman Marcus suffered a smaller breach, and news reports suggest at least six other retailers have been hit. These other companies likely are keeping a close eye on Target’s handling of the crisis.

Critics have focused, in part, on the company’s early communications. Target appeared initially to underestimate the gravity of the situation, crisis consultants said. For example, Target’s first message to customers apologized for the inconvenience.

“You don’t call something like this an inconvenience,” said Rich Klein, a crisis management consultant in New York City.

Initial email (truncated) sent by Target on 12/19/2013. The original email included an additional 4 pages of information.

Initial email (truncated) sent by Target on 12/19/2013. The original email included an additional 4 pages of information.

Subsequent messages from Target used stronger language, acknowledging customers’ stress and anxiety, he said. Messages also switched from assuming customer confidence to promising to regain it, Klein added, praising the change.

“I would still say it’s so much better to get it right the first time,” he said.

2nd email to guests, 12/20/2013.

2nd email to guests, 12/20/2013.

Still, he added, the company made good use of its Twitter feed and Facebook page. Facebook, for example, was used only to communicate about the breach, not to advertise sales, though it also acted as something of a lightning rod for complaints.

Consultants also panned the company’s decision to extend a 10 percent discount to shoppers during the weekend of Dec. 21, a few days after news of the breach first surfaced. While the discount was a nice gesture, it did not adequately address customer concerns and seemed to suggest the crisis had passed, consultants said.

In addition, the company has occasionally appeared to be behind the news, with information trickling out in the media before being revealed by Target, said Jeff Jubelirer, vice president of Philadelphia-based Bellevue Communications Group. “We should expect more from a retailer of that size and that reputation and that level of success.”

A key turning point came on Jan.13 when the company’s CEO, Gregg Steinhafel, appeared on CNBC, apologizing for the breach, reassuring customers and defending the company’s reaction:

Steinhafel should have been giving interviews in December, said Jonathan Bernstein, an independent crisis management consultant in Los Angeles. “They would have suffered less loss of sales and less impact on their stock value if they had been more assertive from the get-go.”

Other observers gave Target high marks for making a relatively quick disclosure of the breach and offering a free year of credit monitoring to customers. The four-day gap between discovery of the breach on Dec. 15 and public disclosure on Dec. 19 was faster than it’s been in other cases, said Alysa Hutnik, an attorney in the Washington, D.C. office of Kelley Drye.

“I haven’t done the math, but I think that would rate somewhere at the very top,” said Hutnik, who specializes in cyber security issues.

Another high point is the prominent role of Target’s CEO, Hutnik said. “He knows there’s work to be done to earn back customer trust, and it looks like he is taking that obligation seriously,” she said, noting that top executives rarely serve as public faces after a data breach.

Other positive steps include Target’s $5 million investment in cyber security education said Michael Soza, a partner in accounting and consulting firm BDO.

“This latest move … is really going on the offensive to show that they really are trying to get out in front of this thing and really attack what is not just a Target problem,” Soza said.

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As long as no other damaging details leak out, most customers will remain loyal to the chain, said Daniel Korschun, an assistant professor of marketing at Drexel University in Philadelphia.

But the company will have to work harder to win back customers who suffered directly. They will be hard to find and hard to soothe, especially if they’ve had to spend hours on the phone undoing damage to their credit or bank accounts.

“Those are the ones where the trust has really been lost,” Korschun said.

Joel Berg is a freelance writer and adjunct writing teacher based in York, Pa. He has covered business and regulatory issues. He can be reached at riskletters@lrp.com.
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Risk Insider: Nir Kossovsky

2015: Resolve to Reframe Reputation Risk

By: | January 9, 2015 • 2 min read
Nir Kossovsky is the Chief Executive Officer of Steel City Re. He has been developing solutions for measuring, managing, monetizing, and transferring risks to intangible assets since 1997. He is also a published author, and can be reached at nkossovsky@steelcityre.com.

Reputation risk is not going away. For the fifth consecutive year, managing reputation risk tops surveys of C-suite imperatives such as the recently published report from Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited (DTTL) / Forbes Insights.

Even Warren Buffett cited it in his Dec. 19, 2014 letter to his top executives to remind them that the “top priority — trumping everything else, including profits — is that all of us continue to zealously guard Berkshire’s reputation.”

Few today would challenge the fact that managing reputation risk is paramount for a company’s long-term success.

Even skeptics now have a clear and compelling business case: For the median company, the upside measure of success is an expected additional 4.3 percent annual return on equity. The scoring, discussed further on, is the product of building value with both a strong defense and an effective offense.

Executed properly, reputational continuity yields stakeholders who will forgive a company for an operational failure and its one-time extraordinary costs.

Playing defense is fundamental to enterprise risk management. The heart of the strategy is operational risk control because reputational consequences often follow operational failures — especially in the areas of human behavior.

At high maturity levels, traditional ERM seeks to prevent adverse events or mitigate their consequences through such strategies as enterprise-wide risk awareness, scenario modeling, and technology-generated actionable intelligence.

But adverse events will happen. As Buffett noted in his December letter, it’s “inevitable … the chances of getting through the day without any bad behavior occurring is nil.”

So continuity management is also very important — not only operational continuity, but reputational continuity.

Executed properly, reputational continuity yields stakeholders who will forgive a company for an operational failure and its one-time extraordinary costs.

That is why Buffet has been saying for more than 25 years, “We can afford to lose money — even a lot of money. But we can’t afford to lose reputation — even a shred of reputation.”

Reputational continuity is a product of good governance. It manifests in strategy, resource allocation, and controls, which are all reflections of culture, mission and leadership. “Culture, more than rule books, determines how an organization behaves,” says Buffett.

On offense, taking the strategy to the stakeholders can create value. When stakeholders can appreciate improvements in governance, controls and risk management that upgrade their long-term expectations, equity values will rise.

The reputation value metrics we use at Steel City Re reflect this appreciation. The annual equity portfolios distilled from the S&P500 (RepuSPX) on the basis of our metrics have returned an excess of 9.5 percent per year on average (4.3 percent median).

The 12-year result as of Jan. 1, 2015 is a 367.12 percent return, which compares favorably with the S&P500’s 12-year return of 79.27 percent.

The increased equity value reflects both cost savings and revenue enhancements. Better reputations lead to stakeholder behaviors that create greater enterprise value through better terms from employees and vendors for services, and better terms for capital from creditors and equity investors.

Regulators are guided by law to be more lenient. For customers, better reputations create shorter sales cycles, larger unit volumes, and customer willingness to accept premium product pricing.

Resolve this year to manage reputation, not merely its risk, for success.

Read all of Nir Kossovsky’s Risk Insider contributions.

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Sponsored: Healthcare Solutions

Diversifying Top Management in Workers’ Comp

Inaugural Women in Workers’ Compensation (WiWC) Forum focuses on advancing more women into top leadership roles.
By: | January 7, 2015 • 5 min read

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The panel at the inaugural Women in Workers’ Compensation (WiWC) Forum. From left to right: Eileen Ramallo, Elaine Vega, Nina Smith-Garmon, Nancy Hamlet, Michelle Weatherson, Nanette de la Torre, Danielle Lisenbey.

Across the country, the business community is engaged in a robust conversation about women being under-represented among c-level positions.

Why aren’t more women breaking into upper management roles? Does gender bias still exist? And, perhaps more importantly, what can women and men do to add more diversity to top leadership ranks?

Elaine Vega and Nancy Hamlet, of Healthcare Solutions, the Duluth, Ga.-based health services provider to the workers’ compensation and auto liability/PIP markets, have discussed the issue between themselves many times over the years.

The duo agreed that starting an industry-wide conversation would be an effective start to addressing the challenge. After three years of internal discussions, the inaugural Women in Workers’ Compensation (WiWC) Forum became reality. Judging by the attendance, content and feedback, it was an auspicious, very successful, debut.

Nancy Hamlet, Senior Vice President of Marketing, Healthcare Solutions

Nancy Hamlet, Senior Vice President of Marketing, Healthcare Solutions

Specifically, Healthcare Solutions and LRP Publications teamed up at the National Workers’ compensation and Disability Conference (NWCDC), held Nov. 18-21, 2014 in Las Vegas, to present the first WiWC event focused on the development of women as leaders within the industry. The WiWC debut featured a keynote speaker, a panel discussion and a networking cocktail hour.

“We believe this is just the beginning for the WiWC organization,” said Hamlet, senior vice president of marketing, adding that the event’s main theme was the conversation regarding challenges that still exist for women in the workplace is “current, real … and relevant.”

Originally the forum was allocated a room to hold 150 people. Vega and Hamlet worried about the room being too large, so they asked LRP what the contingency would be to make the room smaller if they couldn’t fill it. They needn’t have worried, as more than 400 women, and some men as well, registered and attended, requiring an even larger room.

“Clearly, the topic is relevant and there was plenty to discuss,” said Vega, senior vice president of account management.

Hamlet explained that WiWC was formed to create an open forum to promote a strong sense of community and support for current and future female leaders in the workers’ compensation industry. Going forward, the WiWC forum will provide insight and ideas with opportunities for members to:

  • Engage … with accomplished industry professionals and build lasting relationships.
  • Enrich … their knowledge base with tactical insights from speakers and panelists.
  • Explore … opportunities and challenges facing women leaders today.
  • Encounter … senior executives’ perspectives on leadership.
  • Examine … leadership strategies and how to effectively apply the strategies.
  • Empower … themselves and others to achieve success and groundbreaking results.

At the inaugural event, keynote speaker Peggy Holtman, co-author of “Leading at the Edge: Leadership Lessons from the Extraordinary Saga of Shackleton’s Antarctic Expedition,” discussed how a seemingly unconnected historical event can offer critical lessons on leadership in the workplace, especially for women looking to move into top executive spots.

Elaine Vega, Senior Vice President of Account Management, Healthcare Solutions

Elaine Vega, Senior Vice President of Account Management, Healthcare Solutions

After Holtman’s talk, a panel discussion, moderated by Vega, offered the perspectives of five workers’ compensation industry executives on ways in which women can navigate past the glass ceiling. Panelists included Eileen Ramallo , EVP Healthcare Solutions; Danielle Lisenbey, CEO Broadspire; Nanette de la Torre, VP Zenith; Nina Smith-Garmon, EVP Mitchell International; and Michelle Weatherson, Director, Claims Medical and Regulatory Division, State Fund of Calif.

The panelists discussed a wide range of topics related to women in workers’ compensation. For example, one topic focused on the need to take the big risks when it comes to moving past workplace barriers. Other topics included the importance of women in higher positions serving as sponsors and advocates for younger, less experienced women; and the impact of industry consolidation on women’s careers and how to best manage that change. Another topic was how women could best master conflict and emotions in the workplace.

“What’s clear is conflict has to be managed; it will not go away. It will only get worse,” said Healthcare Solutions’ Ramallo. “It then can create other rifts that won’t necessarily be visible immediately, but can have a very large impact. You have to be able to understand what it is early on from another’s perspective, why the situation exists, and then encourage and try to resolve a conflict situation, whatever may be driving it.”

In the wake of the first WiWC Forum, Hamlet noted that while there are countless general reports showing that women have not yet achieved equal representation in top leadership positions in the workplace, studies deal with averages rather than individual stories. And while women must continue to look at the data and work toward closing the gap, hearing from accomplished women in the workers’ compensation industry at NWCDC drove home critical messages on a person level.

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Today, Vega and Hamlet are looking to expand WiWC to make it “truly owned” by the industry. For example, they expect to recruit companies interested in becoming sponsors, forming an advisory council, creating a charter and discussing future possibilities for the organization on both the national and regional levels.

“Much remains to be done, but I have confidence that we will come together and make the organization stronger so that it prospers for years to come,” Hamlet said. “After all, it’s clear that our industry is filled with talented women who can make things happen!”

Vega added that WiWC has already received requests to live stream the event in the future, so it will examine the feasibility of that option in an effort to be even more inclusive.

“We have a shared vision for improving opportunities for current and future women leaders in workers’ compensation,” Vega said. “It doesn’t matter our gender or our title, it’s all about supporting the greater vision. As was said several times at the event, this is just the beginning. We hope more women and men will join us in this continued dialogue.”

For more information about the WiWC, send email to wiwcleadership@healthcaresolutions.com or join our WiWC group on LinkedIn.

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This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with Healthcare Solutions. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.




Healthcare Solutions serves as a health services company delivering integrated solutions to the property and casualty markets, specializing in workers’ compensation and auto liability/PIP.
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