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Risk Scenario + Webinar

The Best Laid Plans

Treatment delays and other effects of health care reform implementation blind-side a deal between a regional employer and a health care system.
By: | September 27, 2013 • 8 min read
Risk Scenarios are created by Risk & Insurance editors along with leading industry partners. The hypothetical, yet realistic stories, showcase emerging risks that can result in significant losses if not properly addressed.

Disclaimer: The events depicted in this scenario are fictitious. Any similarity to any corporation or person, living or dead, is merely coincidental.

Part One

Hale Everson disliked silence and wasn’t bothered by visible distractions. A natural multitasker, he liked to keep D.C. Span, the 24-hour news channel devoted to Washington politics, on his office TV.

As the Human Resources director for the Southern operations of Fuego Motors, a leading European car maker, Hale had been working for years to create a state-of-the-art health care monitoring system for the automobile manufacturing plant’s employees.

On the computer monitor in front of him, there were no less than 10 open spreadsheets.

Hale loved data and along with the auto plant’s risk manager, he had compiled plenty of it.

Hale paused at his keyboard and shifted his attention to his TV set. The U.S. Senate was voting on the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

“Come on boys, come on,” he said, as he watched the “yes” votes pile up. Hale wasn’t worried about the outcome of the vote. He’d been preparing for this day for years.

***

When it came to what he required to work well, Brady Heller, the CFO for Apex Care, a regional hospital, was a door-shut type, even though he had a corner office. Brady hated any sort of distraction.

Scenario Partner

Scenario Partner

It wasn’t until he got home late that night and watched the 11 o’clock news that Brady found out the Affordable Care Act had passed. Brady watched impassively as his wife sat next to him.

Always keeping his cards close to his vest, Brady quietly calculated what Apex Care had spent over the past four years to acquire numerous specialty practices to build a state-of-the art Accountable Care Organization.

Brady wasn’t worried about the outcome of the vote either. He’d also been preparing for this day for years.

***

Brady and Hale, friends since college, were walking down the fourth fairway at the local country club when the two community leaders, key members of the local chamber of commerce, put their well-disciplined heads together.

“Nice job picking up Neil Zane’s cardiac practice buddy,” Hale said to his friend with a smile.

“Thanks,” Brady said, as he scanned the grassy rise for his golf ball.

“From what I can tell, you’ve got all the pieces in place,” Hale said.

“I sure hope I do. Cost us enough,” Brady said as he turned to set up a 2-iron shot.

“Brady, hold on just second,” Hale said. Brady turned and looked soberly at Hale, alert to the business-like tone Hale had switched to.

“I think I’ve got all my pieces in place too, and I don’t want to wait ‘til the wind changes. I want to bring my entire workforce to Apex on a direct contract. I’ve got all the data…”

“I bet you do,” Brady said.

“And with my documentation we can get this done sooner rather than later,” Hale said.

“You got everybody ready?” Brady asked.

“I’ve got everybody on board, from Turin to where we’re standing right here,” Hale said, and Brady could tell that Hale meant every word.

Within three weeks, the local business weekly ran a story under the following headline and subhead.

“Fuego and Apex Ink Healthcare Pact”

“Savings and better quality of care in focus in multi-million-dollar arrangement”

The story featured a picture of Brady and Hale shaking hands over a conference table.

Poll Question

How do you envision health care reform impacting your workforce’s health in general?

View Results

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Part Two

Under the direct contract with Apex, Fuego’s workers and their dependents would receive exclusive health care at the regional health giant for three years. The contract was set to renew as long as costs didn’t deviate more than five percent on an annual basis from projections.

Scenario_BestLaidPlans

Seven months after the direct contract deal was announced, Serge Bernstein, head of Apex’s high-profile bariatric medicine and weight loss clinic, requested a face-to-face meeting with Brady.

“I have to ask you, did you have access to Fuego’s health care data before you agreed to this deal?” Dr. Bernstein asked Brady.

“I know as a matter of fact that the company keeps excellent records,” Brady said as an opening defense.

“Well, I keep pretty good data on my end as well,” Dr. Bernstein said, as he expertly swiped his digital tablet to bring ups some figures.

“The contract with Fuego says costs can’t deviate more than five percent from projections,” he said.

“That’s correct,” Brady said.

“What would you say if I told you that I am seeing instances of diabetes in that population at about 250 percent of projections?” Dr. Bernstein said.

“I’d be very concerned,” Brady said.

“Then you should be very concerned,” Dr. Bernstein said.

Two weeks later it was the hospital system’s head of orthopedics, Krishnan Gilani, who was sitting in Brady’s office.

“I’ve got a four-week waiting list for initial non-emergency evaluations,” Dr. Gilani said.

“Why?” Brady said.

“Have you heard of the Affordable Care Act? This autoworker population requires a lot of care. Many of them are overweight, which complicates treatment. I’ve also got a threefold increase in overall caseload due to all the previously uninsureds coming on board under the new law,” Dr. Gilani said.

“Wow,” Brady said.

“Wow indeed, Mr. Heller,” Dr. Gilani said. “These are substantially out of whack figures and of great concern,” Dr. Gilani said.

***

Hale and Brady were mostly silent as Hale lined up a putt and the two of them digested the information that the increased number of insureds coming in for treatment was threatening to broadside their direct contracting arrangement.

“It’s the first year of the program,” Hale said after his putt lipped out. “I’m sure the numbers will settle down in years two and three.”

“You’re probably right,” Brady said as he stood over his putt.

“You’re probably right.”

Poll Question

What steps is your company taking to educate executives on the impacts of health care reform?

View Results

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Part Three

Hale’s view of his in-office television screen is obscured by the bulk of the autoworkers’ union vice president. To the vice president’s left is the union president. Neither of them looks healthy and neither of them looks especially pleased.

Scenario_BestLaidPlans

“Eighteen months ago you sold this hospital deal to us, saying it would be better for the workers and their families. You said we’d get better treatment, cheaper, and better access to treatment,” the union president said.

“I did say that, that’s true,” Hale said

“None of that was true,” the vice president said.

“We got a guy on the line, he twists his back trying to keep an engine compartment bonnet in place. You know how long it takes him to see a back specialist?”

“I don’t…” Hale begins.

“How about five weeks?” the vice president said. “Five weeks!”

“And this is the only hospital we can go to,” the president said.

“I thought health care reform was about choice. You know what? We have no choice,” the union president said.

“Am I in Russia now because I feel like I’m in Russia,” the union vice president says to the union president.

The quarterly meetings between hospital management and the medical team leaders have become so fraught with tension for Brady Heller that they begin to feel like out-of-body experiences.

Dr. Bernstein, Dr. Gilani and Dr. Helen Beers, chair of the cardiac unit, have Brady in their cross-hairs.

“When you brought my practice into your system, I was assured that I could maintain my care standards, that my cost of risk would be reduced by 20 percent and that my revenues would increase by 30 percent,” Dr. Beers begins.

“None of that has happened,” she said, fixing formidable steel blue eyes on Brady through her titanium eyeglass frames.

“Instead I’m seeing delays in payment. I am seeing care standards that I never would have tolerated independently, and I am seeing this across a number of departments, not just my own,” she said.

“We want access to full financial documentation under the terms of our contracts or we are walking, I am not kidding you,” Dr. Bernstein said.

Brady looked from Dr. Bernstein to Dr. Gilani to Dr. Beers. Nowhere was there mercy or understanding.

Hale has a board meeting of his own to attend.

“If we pay them this $3 million that they’re asking for,” the CFO for North America says to Hale.

“On top of the contracted amount,” he says, looking around the table for emphasis, to make sure everyone is getting his point.

“On top of the contracted amount,” he says yet again, unmercifully.

“What assurances do we have that we’re not going to be shelling out another $3 million in six months to a year from now?” the CFO asks.

“I’m not sure that I can offer you any assurances,” Hale says.

“We’re seeing treatment delays and co-morbidities that are beyond the scope of our projections,” he adds.

“I thought this was the best health care money could buy,” the CFO says.

“It may be,” says the North American CEO, who has made a special point to be at this meeting.

“The issue is we didn’t know it would take this much money to buy it.”

The CEO fires Hale Everson that very evening.

Poll Question

How will Health Care Reform impact the level of involvement you have in the care delivery system for your employees?

View Results

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Summary

A sizable regional employer and a large health care system come to grief when their directly contracted health care arrangement is blind-sided by health care reform implementation. The planners of the deal fail to take into account the delays in treatment that large numbers of previously uninsured patients coming into the system will create. Contrary to their promises, standards of health care deteriorate and key stakeholders become alienated.

1. The importance of good data: Data is only actionable if it is good data. Fuego Motors thought it had adequately measured the health care risks inherent in its employee population, but events proved it to be woefully wrong. The advent of the Affordable Care Act is going to impact medical treatment and loss projections are going to have to be altered.

2. Assess your contract: Direct contracts to provide health care services to employers might make a lot of strategic sense, but they can turn into straightjackets if not written with enough flexibility to account for increasing health care costs and the unknowns of health care reform.

3. Medical practice acquisition is fraught with perils: Bigger is not necessarily better when it comes to health care business management. Conflicting work cultures and compensation and quality of care expectations can lead to disagreements, litigation or worse if contractual provisions aren’t spelled out adequately.

4. Health care regulation is in conflict: Federal health care reform is not the only wind sweeping the waters. There are numerous federal and state entities regulating health care and their missions and mandates are not in step with each other. Understanding the full lay of the land moving forward is a must.

5. Move with measured steps: There is so much going on in health care practice and regulation right now that the unknowns outnumber the knowns. Look at acquisition targets with more caution than ever before.

6. Be fully transparent: Both sides thought they had all the data they needed. But in the end, their failure to completely share with their data with their respective teams created unpleasant surprises. Being fully candid about all risks is the best strategy in this unsure environment.

The Webinar

The issues covered in this scenario were in part based on the impact of health care reform. This follow-up webinar focused on specific changes to the health care market in the wake of Affordable Care Act implementation and presented actions insureds can take to prepare themselves moving forward.

Download a copy of the slide presentation here.

Dan Reynolds is editor-in-chief of Risk & Insurance. He can be reached at dreynolds@lrp.com.
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Risk Scenario

The Scales of Justice

Two employee injuries at the same company produce two very different outcomes.
By: | August 26, 2014 • 9 min read
Risk Scenarios are created by Risk & Insurance editors along with leading industry partners. The hypothetical, yet realistic stories, showcase emerging risks that can result in significant losses if not properly addressed.

Disclaimer: The events depicted in this scenario are fictitious. Any similarity to any corporation or person, living or dead, is merely coincidental.

Frankie and Hector

“It’s a great day for the Irish!”

Scenario_ScalesJustice

Whether they loved him or found him annoying, workers in the seafood and meat departments in the Better Harvest grocery store in Boston’s Back Bay knew the meaning of that booming morning greeting very well.

It declared that boisterous fish cleaner and erstwhile fish-counter salesman Frankie Burns was at work, and he wanted everybody to know it.

Despite his sometimes jarring presence, most people loved Frankie. Frankie knew seafood, having worked on his family’s cod boat when he was younger. Now, at 55, he provided a knowledge of local fish and shellfish that was an asset in a store catering to the Back Bay’s educated, prosperous consumers.

Barrel-chested, with forearms, shoulders and biceps solidly built from years of manual labor, Frankie cheerfully and proudly unloaded the tubs of hake, pollock and flounder sold by the market.

This May morning, though, would prove to be a wake-up call for the hard-living Frankie. As he had thousands of times before, Frankie hoisted a heavy tub of iced pollock up onto the fish-cutting counter. This time, though, his back gave out.

“Whoa,” Frankie said as he clutched his lower back, wincing at the piercing, unfamiliar pain there.

Whoa indeed.

Testing revealed that Frankie had aggravated a chronic degenerative back condition. His claim was found to be compensable.

Scenario Partner

Scenario Partner

With 180 stores nationwide and close to $8 billion in sales, Better Harvest’s human resources department was well-versed in the amendments to the Americans with Disabilities Act that were enacted in 2008.

Following Better Harvest’s well-documented procedures, and at Frankie’s reluctant request, Back Bay store manager Gracie Walker granted Frankie an accommodation under the ADA.

For now, Frankie was done hoisting ice-filled fish tubs. The store would need to find another fish cutter as the heaviest thing Frankie would be permitted to lift would be paper-wrapped one pound cod fillets.

“Hey, a job’s a job,” Frankie said, as he hoisted a beer and a Fenway Frank with his brother Petey at a Sox game that summer.

————–

Hector Velasquez was the fish cutter in Better Harvest’s Brentwood, Calif. store.

At 53, Hector’s idea of a good time was to go Zydeco dancing with his latest and greatest girlfriend Vera at the Puma Club in nearby Venice Beach.

That’s exactly what Hector was doing on a steaming hot California night during a performance of his favorite Zydeco band, the Vallejo Oyster Crackers. But Hector made a misstep due to a slippery combination of spilled beer and crushed peanut shells on the dance floor of the Puma Club.

Vera tumbled to the ground with Hector but popped right back up, adjusting her hair and skirt in the process. Hector wasn’t so lucky.

“Honey, are you hurt?” Vera said.

Hector, whose love of beer, fried seafood and tortillas had left him with a stout belly, tried to get up but couldn’t.

Another dancer, seeing Hector in distress, stopped Hector from trying to move.

“Stay still, man,” the Zydeco dancer said. “You might have really hurt yourself.”

Hector’s fellow dancer put his hand on Hector’s belly to still his movements and pushed a chair cushion under his head.

“Be still a minute, man, and breathe — breathe against the pain,” the Zydeco dancer said.

Hector looked up at the man thankfully and started to breathe more deeply, his beer belly rising and falling with each labored breath.

Hector couldn’t make it to work the following Monday and filed for leave under the Family Medical Leave Act.

Poll Question

How familiar are your risk management and human resources departments with the amendments to the Americans with Disabilities Act that were enacted in 2008?

View Results

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Tough Medicine

Hector rested for a few days, trying to dull the pain with Ibuprofen and light beer. Given that he wasn’t hurt at work, Hector didn’t go to a doctor, thinking he might end up bearing the cost of treatment that he couldn’t afford.

Scenario_ScalesJustice

On the Thursday after his injury, Hector got a ride from a buddy and came back to work. Hector is self-medicating, taking unhealthy doses of Ibuprofen in an attempt to perform his job.

He barely made it through Thursday and Friday, depending on co-workers to cover for him. Over the weekend, home resting but still in substantial pain, Hector faced the music.

“There’s no way, man,” he said, looking at his bent-over body in the bathroom mirror.

“I gotta talk to somebody.”

The following Monday, Dave Wagner, the general manager of the Brentwood Better Harvest store, got a knock on his office door.

Being the GM of this store, with its affluent and demanding customer base, was no joke. Dave Wagner was one busy man.

“Hector, what’s up?” Dave said.

“I need to talk to you, Mr. Wagner. It’s my back. I hurt it bad the other night and I can’t do any lifting, not much anyway,” Hector said.




Dave did some rapid-fire mental calculations as he gestured Hector to a chair.

“Sit down Hector, sit down,” he said.

Hector moved slowly to sit down, telling Dave everything he needed to know about how badly Hector was hurting.

“I’ll tell you what Hector, I’ll tell you what,” Dave said, as memories of Better Harvest HR emails concerning the ADA flashed through his formidable memory.

“Hold on a sec,” Dave said and popped down at his desk. In two clicks and a couple of scrolls, Dave scanned some emails from HR.

“Reasonable accommodation” is the phrase that stuck in Dave’s mind as he rapidly scanned the emails.

“You don’t have to lift,” Dave said, turning back to Hector. “You can work the counter. How does that sound?”

Hector, although in substantial pain, brightened some.

“That sounds good Mr. Wagner, thank you,” Hector said. But Hector’s feeble attempts to stand up sent Dave a message.

“Talk to Marcus and tell him what I said and I’ll talk to him too,” Dave said, as Hector made his way out.

As Hector went off to find Marcus, the manager of the seafood department, Dave engaged in professional, removed reflection.

“We’ll see what’s reasonable. I’ll give it three months,” he said to himself, before his vibrating cellphone distracted him.

“Cripe,” the harried Dave said to himself, looking at the number and picking up his phone.

“Dave Wagner,” he said impatiently to whoever was on the line.

Three months came and went, and Dave had to make a call. Hector just wasn’t that strong on the counter.

You had to have serious customer service skills to handle Brentwood and Beverly Hills customers and Hector was flailing. Complaints about him were coming at Dave from all sides, customers, co-workers, you name it.

“Reasonable means reasonable,” Dave said to himself as, worn down with complaints about Hector’s customer service shortcomings, he moved to terminate him.

Poll Question

How well do you document interactions with employees that touch on ADA or Family Medical Leave Act compliance issues?

View Results

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The Wheel Turns

After his firing, it didn’t take long for the befuddled Hector to hook up with a gifted, ambitious employment rights attorney, Lucia Yamamoto, a graduate of Berkeley Law and a passionate defender of workers’ rights.

Scenario_ScalesJustice

This is how the pre-trial negotiations went between Yamamoto’s firm, The Workers’ Rights Center, and the firm that did defense work for Better Harvest’s employment liability carrier, Apex Insurance.

“Okay guys, this is an easy one,” Yamamoto said on the phone call with the Apex defense team.

“We don’t see it that way,” was the game response from Ed Kleindinst, the defense lead for Apex’s law firm, Kleindinst, Evans, Hale & Brown.

“Oh really?” Yamamoto said, her derision palpable.

“You got two guys, practically the same age. They’re both working the same job. I mean this is beautiful,” she said.

“You accommodate one guy, and he’s still got a job,” Yamamoto said.

“Your GM in the Boston store continues to accommodate him, according to widely disseminated company policy…,” she continued.

“I don’t think you’re in a position to know how widely disseminated it was,” Kleindinst responded.

“Like it matters,” Yamamoto shot back.

“The other guy, same company, you terminate after 90 days even though it’s not presenting an undue hardship to your business. Instead, he was terminated because the manager felt he had accommodated him for long enough, which runs contrary to the company policy,” Yamamoto says.

“Been there 20 years, married with four children. Never been disciplined in his working life. Hello? Are you guys still there?” she said.

“We’re here,” Kleindinst said, this time with a little less vigor, pushing the mute button and rolling his eyes at his co-counsel in one of the Kleindinst, Evans, Hale & Brown conference rooms.

One of the partners jotted a note on a sheet of paper and slid it in front of Kleindinst.

There was a pause — orchestrated on the part of both Yamamoto and Kleindinst.

“Well, you’re not saying anything,” Yamamoto said.

“Go on, please, counsel,” Kleindinst said.

“Oh I’ll go on, I could go on all day with this one,” Yamamoto said.

“Two million,” she said.

“Oh come on!” Kleindinst said.

“See you in court!” Yamamoto replied.

Kleindinst’s partner jerks his head at the sheet of paper, trying to focus Kleindinst.

“One million,” Kleindinst said.

“One and six or we go to court and no more of this,” Yamamoto said.

There is another pause.

“Gentlemen, are we done?” said Yamamoto.

Kleindinst looked at his co-counsel, who nodded and pulled back in his chair.

“Yes, we’re done,” Kleindinst said.

***

“I really, really don’t like her,” Kleindinst said to his partner after he hung up.

“Like it matters,” his partner said.

Poll Question

Are you aware of the section of the ADA which stipulates that employees seeking an injury accommodation shouldn’t have to compete with other employees for the accommodation?

View Results

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Bar-Lessons-Learned---Partner's-Content-V1b

Risk & Insurance® partnered with Sedgwick to produce this scenario. Below are Sedgwick’s recommendations on how to prevent the losses presented in the scenario. This perspective is not an editorial opinion of Risk & Insurance®.

1. Medical review: Make sure you request and document medical reviews of any request for leave or accommodation under the Family Medical Leave Act or the Americans with Disabilities Act as part of the overall interactive accommodation process.

2. Consistency: Different injured employees with debilitating chronic conditions should be treated with consistency under the Americans with Disabilities Act, regardless of whether their need for accommodation is due to a work-related injury, a non-occupational injury or illness or for another medical need.

3. Document, document, document: Companies need to make sure that standard procedures regarding leave or accommodation under the Family Medical Leave Act or the Americans with Disabilities Act are in place, up to date and triggering interactive process review – as well as clearly communicated to employees. Companies also need to document that they have communicated changes to those policies in a comprehensive and timely manner. A robust information management platform is key to supporting the process and necessary documentation.

4. The leave option: Although the goal of ADA/ADAAA is to keep people at work and every effort should be made to meet an accommodation request, supervisors need to keep in mind that there may be cases where a workplace accommodation isn’t possible or advisable due to the significant hardship it would place on their business; time off from work may be the only option. Shoe-horning an employee into a task they are unfit for may do more harm than good.

5. Disabled means disabled: Under the law, even if a condition is “controlled” by medication or some other treatment method, a disability is still a disability. Be very careful not to treat someone with a chronic condition differently just because they’re asymptomatic.

Additional Resources

ADA Accommodation Services

Sedgwick Connection Blog


Dan Reynolds is editor-in-chief of Risk & Insurance. He can be reached at dreynolds@lrp.com.
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Sponsored Content by Helios

Medication Monitoring Achieves Better Outcomes

Having the right patient medication monitoring tools is increasingly beneficial.
By: | September 2, 2014 • 5 min read
SponsoredContent_Helios

There are approximately three million workplace injuries in any given year. Many, if not the majority, involve the use of prescription medications and a significant portion of these medications is for pain. In fact, prescription medications are so prevalent in workers’ compensation that they account for 70% of total medical spend, with roughly one third being Schedule II opioids (Helios; NCCI; WCRI; et al.). According to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), between the years of 1997 and 2007, the daily milligram per person use of prescription opioids in the United States rose 402%, increasing from an average of 74 mg to 369 mg. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that, in 2012, health care providers wrote 259 million prescriptions—enough for every American adult to have a bottle of pills—and 46 people die every day from an overdose of prescription painkillers in the US. Suffice to say, the appropriate use of opioid analgesics continues to be a serious issue in the United States.

Stakeholders throughout the workers’ compensation industry are seeking solutions to bend the curve away from misuse and abuse and these concerning statistics. Change is happening: The American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (ACOEM) and the Work Loss Data Institute have published updated guidelines to promote more clinically appropriate use of opioids in the treatment of occupational injuries. State legislatures are implementing and enhancing prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs). The Food and Drug Association (FDA) is rescheduling medications. Pharmaceutical manufacturers are creating abuse-deterrent formulations. Meanwhile payers, generally in concert with their pharmacy benefit manager (PBM), are expending considerable effort to build global medication management programs that emphasize proactive utilization management to ensure injured workers are receiving the right medication at the right time.

SponsoredContent_Helios

A variety of factors can still influence the outcome of a workers’ compensation claim. Some are long-recognized for their affect on a claim; for example, body part, nature of injury, state of jurisdiction, and regulatory policy. In contrast, prescribing practices and physician demographics are perhaps a bit unexpected given the more contemporary data analysis showing their influence on outcomes. Such is the case for medication monitoring. Medication monitoring tools promote patient safety, confirm adherence, and identify potential high-risk, high-cost claims. Three of the more common medication monitoring tools include:

  • Urine Drug Testing (UDT) is an analysis of the injured worker’s urine that detects the presence or absence of a specified drug. Although it is not a diagnosis, UDT results are generally a reliable indicator of what is present (and what is not) in the injured body worker’s system. The knowledge gained through the testing helps to minimize risks for undesired consequences including misuse, abuse, and diversion of opioids. With this information in hand, adjustments to the medication therapy regimen or other intervention activities can occur. UDT can also be an agent of positive change, as monitoring often leads to behavior modification, whether in direct response to an unexpected testing result or from the sentinel effect of knowing that medication use is being monitored.
  • Medication Agreements or “Pain Contracts” signed by the injured worker and their prescribing doctor serve as a detailed and well-documented informed consent describing the risks and benefits associated with the use of prescription pain medications. Medication agreements help the prescribing doctor set expectations regarding the patient’s adherence to the prescribed medication therapy regimen. They serve as a means to facilitate care and provide for a way to document mutual understanding by clearly delineating the roles, responsibilities, and expectations of each party. Research also suggests that medication agreements promote safety and education as injured workers learn more about their therapy regimen, its risks, and benefits.
  • Pill Counts quantify adherence by comparing the number of doses remaining in a pill bottle with the number of doses that should remain based on prescription instructions. Most often, physicians request pill counts at random intervals or the physician may ask the injured worker to bring their medication to all appointments. As a monitoring tool, pill counts can be useful in confirming proper use, or conversely, diversion activities.

On a stand-alone basis, these tools rank high on individual merit. When used together as part of a consolidated medication management approach, their impact escalates quite favorably. The collective use of UDT, Medication Agreements, and pill counts enhance decision-making, eliminating gaps in understanding. Their use raises awareness of potential high-risk, high-cost situations. Moreover, when used in concert with a collaborative effort on the part of the payer, PBM, physician, and injured worker, they can improve communication and align objectives to mitigate misuse or abuse situations throughout the life of a claim.

SponsoredContent_Helios

Medication monitoring can achieve better outcomes

The vast majority of injured workers use medications as directed. Unfortunately, situations of misuse and abuse are far too common. Studies show a growing trend of discrepancies between the medication prescription and actual medication-regimen adherence when it comes to claimants on opioid therapy (Health Trends: Prescription Drug Monitoring Report, 2012). In response, payers, working alongside with their PBM and other stakeholders, are deploying medication monitoring tools with greater frequency to verify the injured worker is appropriately using their medications, particularly opioid analgesics. The good news is these efforts are working. Forty-five percent of patients with previously demonstrated aberrant drug-related behaviors were able to adhere to their medication regimens after management with drug testing or in combination with signed treatment agreements and multispecialty care (Laffer Associates and Millennium Research Institute, October 2011).

In our own studies, we have similarly found that clinical interventions performed in conjunction with medication monitoring tools such as UDT reduces utilization of high-risk medications in injured workers on chronic opioid therapy. Results showed there was a decrease in all measures of utilization, driven primarily by opioids (32% decrease) and benzodiazepines (51% decrease), as well as a 26% reduction in total utilization of all medications, regardless of drug class. This is proof positive that medication monitoring can be useful in achieving better outcomes.

This article was produced by Helios and not the Risk & Insurance® editorial team.


Helios, the new name for the powerful combination of Progressive Medical and PMSI, is bringing the focus of workers’ compensation and auto-no fault pharmacy benefit management, ancillary services, and settlement solutions back to where it belongs—the injured party.
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