Risk Scenario + Webinar

The Curse of the Black Adder

A supposed data breach sends a regional grocer scrambling to do damage control.
By: | December 11, 2013 • 8 min read
Risk Scenarios are created by Risk & Insurance editors along with leading industry partners. The hypothetical, yet realistic stories, showcase emerging risks that can result in significant losses if not properly addressed.

Disclaimer: The events depicted in this scenario are fictitious. Any similarity to any corporation or person, living or dead, is merely coincidental.

One Fine Fall Day

Aaron Scott watched with pride as his German shorthaired pointer Sadie bulled her way through the switchgrass. Sadie was six, an age when most hunting dogs started to show signs of aging. But Sadie was as heavy in the chest and shoulders as some males, and just as tough.

Scenario_BlackAdder

Then suddenly Sadie was on point, her stub of a tail twitching frenetically. Seconds later, the male bird exploded out of the brush. Aaron swung his grandfather’s over and under Remington up and dropped the bird cleanly. Aaron smiled. It didn’t get any better than this.

Then his phone rang. He had to get it. As the CFO for Pinecrest Food Markets, which had 44 stores in four states, it was part of his job to take calls, all calls.

“This is Aaron,” he said.

“Aaron, it’s Christine.” Christine was Aaron’s older sister and the CEO of the company. Aaron knew that tone in her voice. The news wasn’t good.

“We just got a letter from Spendex that they’ve been hit by malware. It looks like we may have lost credit card numbers for about 600,000 customers.”

Aaron paused and again looked at the scenery and savored the diminishing scent of spent gunpowder. He wished he could turn back the clock to one minute ago, but all that was gone.

“You there?” Christine said.

“I’m here,” Aaron said.

“Can you please get those dogs in the truck and get back to the office? We got work to do.”

Christine preferred jumping horses to bird-hunting. On a fox hunt, she could ride with anyone in the state.

Aaron loved his sister, but he also bore a scar over his right eyebrow where she’d clocked him with a rock when they were preteens.

“I’m comin’. Be there in 30,” Aaron said.

Pinecrest had been founded by Aaron’s grandfather William in an 800-square-foot shop in Johnstown, Pa. It had grown to where it had stores in eastern Ohio, its native western Pennsylvania, West Virginia and the Maryland panhandle.

Scenario Partner

Scenario Partner

Aaron and Christine ran it now. The phrase “three generations — shirt sleeves to shirt sleeves,” was how old-timers described how quickly an inherited family business could fall apart. Aaron and Christine had vowed they would prove that old saying wrong.

Back at the office, Aaron read the letter from the credit card transaction processing vendor Spendex. Spendex was reporting that as many as 26 of its regional retail customers lost credit card numbers to The Black Adder, a malware that strips names, credit card numbers and expiration dates from the magnetic stripes of credit cards.

“Now what?” said Christine.

“Well, we’ve got to tell every affected customer what happened and we need to do it soon,” Aaron said.

“How much is that going to cost?” Christine said.

“Quite a bit, but we’ve got insurance for it,” Aaron said as calmly as he could as he looked down at his iPhone and started scrolling through his contacts.

Aaron was playing possum with his cool tone. He was the family peacekeeper and he knew that his role at times like these was to keep a lid on the much more volatile Christine.

Christine exhaled, and Aaron kept his eyes on his iPhone.

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False Start

Part of the Pinecrest brand came from where it was based and who founded it.

Based as it was in a state that was home to almost a million military veterans, Pinecrest aligned itself with traditional values like patriotism, community, faith and family.

There was a picture of a local veteran who had given his life in armed conflict in every Pinecrest store.

Scenario_BlackAdder

So when it came to the data breach notification, Christine Scott — in what she felt was full alignment with the brand — didn’t shrink from responsibility.

In addition to letters and emails sent to Pinecrest’s 600,000 affected customers, Christine called local news stations to broadcast news of the breach and her promises to make good. She didn’t bother to ask Aaron whether he thought that was a good idea.

“Every one of our customers will be reimbursed for their time and trouble, including a year’s worth of multi-bureau credit monitoring services,” Christine said while the TV cameras recorded her.

“Well that’s what the policy says, doesn’t it?” Christine said when Aaron told her later that she probably shouldn’t have said that on television.

The very next day, a phone call from Pinecrest’s insurance broker was the second bad call Aaron got that month.

“Multi-bureau? No. The policy will cover services from a single credit monitoring bureau,” the broker, Robert Franz, told Aaron.

As Aaron spoke with Robert, he was multitasking and monitoring his emails. He saw an email marked “urgent” from Spendex. It was about the data breach.

“Hey Robert, can I call you back in a few minutes? I’ve got something hopping here,” Aaron said.

“Sure,“ Robert said, but in a tone that implied, “What could be more important than this?”

As it turned out, the email from Spendex was plenty important.

The notice from Spendex explained that although it was obligated to inform all of its customers that there had been a breach, in reality, only 14 of its 26 retail customers had been impacted. The clincher? Pinecrest wasn’t one of them.

Aaron pushed back from his desk and ran his hands through his hair.

“What the … ?” he said as loudly as he would say anything.

“What is it?” said Christine, popping her head into his office. She knew from the volume of Aaron’s voice that it was something big.

“We didn’t lose any data. We didn’t lose any data at all,” Aaron said.

“Great,” Christine said.

“No, not great,” Aaron said. “We just told about a million people that we did.”

“Now what do we do?” Christine asked.

Aaron felt that Christine had burned him before by going on television without seeking his counsel. That experience caused him to dig in his heels with Christine over what to do next.

“Slow down, just slow down,” Aaron said when the siblings met to go over strategy.

“I don’t know that we need to come out with an announcement just yet.”

Aaron’s reaction to his sister’s outspokenness had caused him to miscalculate. A full week went by until Pinecrest announced on its website and with another email blast that its customers had, after all, not been impacted by the Black Adder strike.

The company’s pause in making that announcement was as toxic as a rattlesnake bite.

The local media reacted negatively to the company’s week-long silence. News that the company sat on the knowledge that customers hadn’t lost data made the front pages of the Johnstown Tribune-Democrat and the Wheeling News-Register.

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Pinecrest’s Pain

For the first time in its history, Pinecrest was dealing with the full brunt of a hit to its reputation.

Scenario_BlackAdder

The traditional print media was one thing, and no small thing in the markets Pinecrest served. But online commentary, ungoverned by journalistic ethics, pulled no punches. Commentators ridiculed the company for banking on the military sacrifices of previous generations, when it “didn’t have the guts,” in one poster’s vernacular, to tell people the truth.

The company’s broker, Robert Franz, phoned Aaron with even more bad news.

“You’re not covered for any of your breach notification expenses, or for any credit monitoring services,” Robert told Aaron.

“Please tell me why,” Aaron said, keeping his voice low because he was just not in the mood for any spontaneous crisis communications with his older sister.

“Under your policy, you’re only covered for notification and credit monitoring if there was an actual breach,” Robert said.

“No breach, no coverage,” he said.

“So we’re out about a million dollars,” Aaron said flatly. In the regional grocery business, where margins could sometimes be measured in the low single digits, a million dollars was a very big hit.

“I’m afraid so,” Robert said.

Sales at Pinecrest Food Markets were down around 10 percent in all four states that it operated in.

“Might as well shop at Supermart,”a grizzled Korean War veteran told Channel 11 in Charles Town, West Virginia.

With the company down a million out of pocket and with revenue hamstrung, Christine Scott and the rest of the Pinecrest team had some very difficult and expensive decisions to make.

Should they sue Spendex for its shoddy forensics? And what coverage did they have for the costs of that?

Rumors began to circulate in several state capitals that class action lawsuits were being prepared on behalf of the tens of thousands of Pinecrest customers who felt they were caused needless expense and worry because of the bad information Pinecrest put out to begin with.

Grandstanding attorneys general were probably not far behind. Pinecrest was possibly facing legal action on several fronts and it was unclear whether it had the coverage to pay for its defense.

*****

With the world seemingly against them, Christine and Aaron took a day in late November and went to their grandfather’s hunting cabin in Somerset County.

The grouse were out there, but the two of them just sat staring at the fire in the cabin’s stone fireplace, with Aaron’s two bird dogs stretched out in front of the fireplace.

Sadie looked up hopefully as Aaron got up to throw another log on the fire.

“No huntin’ today, Sadie girl. Daddy is not in the mood,” Aaron said as Christine nursed a bottle of local craft-distilled rye.

“May I have some of that, please?” Aaron asked.

“Get your own bottle,” said Christine.

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Summary

A regional grocery chain gets into hot water after it loses customer financial data. Making matters worse is that the company does not have a good grasp on the language in its cyber coverage policy. The company also suffers reputational damage when it notifies customers based on bad information.

1. Know your partners: Pinecrest sees its problems go from bad to worse because the company it uses to process credit card transactions has shoddy forensics and reports data breaches for customers that in the end had no data breach.

2. Know your coverage: Pinecrest suffers needless losses because key executives don’t understand its insurance policy when it comes to services available under the coverage for data breach notification and credit monitoring.

3. Be as transparent as possible: When it comes to notifying customers of substantial issues that could impact their expenditures, getting out quickly with the best information is extremely important. Pinecrest actually has good news to report midway through this story, but sits on it due to internal friction. The good of the team must clearly win out here.

4. Create realistic expectations: Coverage existed for Pinecrest officials to put together a reasonable response when customer data was lost. But a key executive broadcast inflated statements about what Pinecrest would be able to do, creating equally inflated expectations.

5. Hold vendors accountable: Given the volatile expansion of cyber risk, it makes good sense to require vendors contractually to indemnify you if they lose your crucial customer data.

The Webinar

The issues covered in this scenario center around crisis management and insurance pitfalls associated with loss from a cyber breach. This follow-up webinar focused on specific loss trends and cyber exposures, as well as presented steps to take to strengthen your crisis risk management program.

Presenters

Webinar_Data_Breach_Aon

Download a copy of the slide presentation here.

Dan Reynolds is editor-in-chief of Risk & Insurance. He can be reached at [email protected]
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Risk Scenario

An Insatiable Beast

A beverage maker’s programmable logic computers are destroyed by a cyber worm.
By: | November 2, 2016 • 9 min read
Risk Scenarios are created by Risk & Insurance editors along with leading industry partners. The hypothetical, yet realistic stories, showcase emerging risks that can result in significant losses if not properly addressed.

Disclaimer: The events depicted in this scenario are fictitious. Any similarity to any corporation or person, living or dead, is merely coincidental.

Part One: Who Kicked the Door In?

Executives with Sweet Life are in a self-congratulatory mode.

Having just plunked down $15 million for a new, just-in-time processing and shipping system, the company leadership feels poised for even greater success.

Sweet Life began its existence in a guest house on an estate in upstate New York owned by the parents of company founder Josh Saltwood.Scenario_AnInsatiableBeast

Starting with a then-unknown Kombucha product, the company grew, selling Kombucha, coconut water and a menu of flavored sparkling water sourced from unquestionably pure springs.

Walk into almost any tony yoga studio along the Atlantic seaboard and you would see some bottle or can with the Sweet Life label on it.

“I want to congratulate everyone involved in this effort,” Saltwood tells his assembled leadership team during a celebratory, well-lubricated meal at one of the best vino-centric restaurants in the Finger Lakes.

Smiles all around, except for Anne Margate, the company’s chief risk officer. Saltwood notices her mood and lifts a wine bottle in her direction as if to offer her more.

She waves the bottle off, and bends her head back down to her BlackBerry, typing feverishly.

Partner

Partner

Saltwood just shakes his head.

“She worries too much,” he says to himself.

Two days later comes a jolt of reality for Saltwood in the form of a phone call from his CIO.

“We’ve got a breach. Doesn’t look too extensive but we’re moving to identify any lost data and isolate the problem,” the CIO says.

“Alright, keep me posted if you think it’s going to get uglier. I especially want to know if any customer data gets compromised,” Saltwood says.

“Roger, Wilco,” says the CIO.

It’s uglier than either Saltwood or his CIO could possibly know.

What’s hit Sweet Life is a cyber worm that goes by the name of “Purple Moray.” The name of the worm reveals its intent.

The worm carries a payload that is designed to search out and destroy — just like its ravenous sea eel namesake — programmable logic computers that control machine processes, the very thing that Sweet Life just purchased as part of its $15 million manufacturing upgrade.

Purple Moray is also equipped with a rootkit component, making its passage through Sweet Life’s information technology systems virtually impossible to detect. Try as they might, Sweet Life’s IT team feels like it is not seeing the whole picture.

Sweet Life’s CIO picks up the phone and calls a forensics team he knows in Rochester.

“Yep,” says the CEO of the forensics team when he picks up the phone. He’s eating potato chips as he talks.

“Yeah, hi Mark,” says the CIO, who has known the forensics CEO since high school.

“Whatcha’ got?” Mark says, crunching a chip.

“Are you eating?” the CIO says agitatedly.

“I’m hungry. What is it?” Mark says.

The CIO shakes off his irritation.

“We need you to come down here. We’ve had a breach and we’re not sure of the extent of it,” the CIO says.

“We’ll be there this afternoon.”

Part Two: Gut-Wrenching Pain

The CIO initially fails to tell Anne Margate what’s going on. Sweet Life is a bit of an old boy’s club — though all the top brass is under 40 — and Anne is not a member of the club.

Scenario_AnInsatiableBeast

But she makes a point of finding out what’s going on within the company regardless. It’s when the Rochester forensics team shows up that she gets wind of what’s happened.

“When were you going to tell me about this?” she asks the CIO.

“I … ,” he manages to get out before she cuts him off.

“We need to tell our insurance broker,” she says. “I’ll send you an invite.”

“Which is more than you did for me,” she says to herself under her breath as she walks away.

“OK to summarize,” the broker says on the call, “we need a full list of any customers affected, then move to notify those customers. And keep the forensic work going.”

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“I’ll let the cyber policy carrier and the crime policy carrier know that we might have a claim coming,” the broker says.

The next day the chief of operations comes into work to find that Sweet Life’s spanking new manufacturing system is down, all the way down.

“All the computers are dead, boss,” says one of the line foremen.

Anne Margate, who is now fully engaged in the recovery attempt, barges into the company lunch room.

There she finds Mark, the forensics guy, and two of his teammates settling down to a lunch of pepperoni pizza and a very large meatball sub.

“What’s going on?” she says.

“We’re having lunch,” Mark says.

“I know that, I mean with our manufacturing process,” she says.

Mark pauses to wipe some red sauce off of his chin.

“You’re, who again?” he says.

“I’m the risk manager,” she says, trying to control her anger.

“Oh,” he says. “What’s happened is that your operations have been attacked by a cyber worm. It’s called Purple Moray. It’s disabled the programmable logic computers that control your machine processes,” he says.

“Are they merely disabled or destroyed?” she says.

“We’re getting to that,” says Mark. “As soon as we finish lunch.”

Sweet Life’s broker, exercising an abundance of caution, contacts the company’s property carrier to notify it that Sweet Life may have a claim against this policy as well.

“It looks like the damages are far more extensive than we thought,” Anne Margate says on a call with Saltwood and the company’s property underwriters.

After she gets off the phone with her property underwriters, Anne Margate has the sickening feeling that in the event of the damages caused by a computer worm of this nature, her cyber, crime and property policies might not be all that well aligned.

Part Three: All Gone

“Can anybody in this company tell me what’s going on with this Purple Moray worm?” Josh Saltwood thunders into the phone from his vacation home in the Hamptons.

“All we’ve been able to do is identify it, we can’t stop it,” says the exhausted CIO.

Sweet Life’s situation is weakening day by day.

Scenario_AnInsatiableBeast

In addition to disabling or damaging key pieces of manufacturing equipment, the worm, through a second payload, did access and steal customer data; much more data than the company’s IT department initially understood to be taken.

The company has to inform customers, including the largest natural foods retailer in the country, that although it thought it hadn’t lost their data, it turns out they had.

“We know we told you a week ago that your information was OK, but it’s not OK,” the CIO and Margate tell the retailer on yet another painful call.

“This thing is like some kind of insatiable beast,” says Mark, the forensics guy, as he sits at an in-house Sweet Life computer, an open bag of peppermint bark on the desk.

“You want some bark?” he says to Margate, who is sitting beside him trying to learn as much as she can about cyber hack forensics.

“No thanks,” she says.

“I’ve never seen anything like this,” says Mark.

Over time, the forensics team, working in congress with Sweet Life’s IT team, is able to isolate the Purple Moray malware and remediate some of the damage done to the company’s computer-controlled manufacturing system.

Anne Margate, who worries about everything, finds that her concerns about her insurance policies were somewhat unfounded.

The cyber, crime and property policies all respond, although not to the degree that every loss is covered.

The company’s property coverage was inadequate to cover all of the damage done to the company’s new manufacturing system. The uninsured loss there is more than $5 million.

Sweet Life is facing a daunting task as it deals with a bruised image in the marketplace and strained relationships with its once loyal customers.

Now it also has to improve its cyber security and convince its insurers that it is a good risk going forward. When Josh Saltwood founded Sweet Life, he was one of three licensed retailers selling Kombucha. When Purple Moray struck, there were more than two dozen U.S.-based producers. The burgeoning coconut water market reflects a similar reality.

As Sweet Life tries to claw back to some semblance of success, it faces an initial market share loss of some $10 million annually, and there is no policy that can insure that.

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Risk & Insurance® partnered with FM Global to produce this scenario. Below are FM Global’s recommendations on how to prevent the losses presented in the scenario. This perspective is not an editorial opinion of Risk & Insurance®.

While one could argue whether cyber risk is still “emerging,” it’s the new reality, and should be dealt with like any other hazard. So, let’s examine this scenario using a traditional risk management approach. Although cyber is a relatively new exposure, traditional risk management concepts apply: risk identification, assessment and mitigation.

Essentially, any organization is subject to a cyber attack, and it’s not a matter of if, but when it happens. In this case, Sweet Life had just upgraded its processing and shipping system, when a data breach occurred. How the breach actually occurred is not clear, but we do know that it did cause some major damage to the industrial system control computers. Serious business interruption ensued, which had a deleterious affect on the company’s supply chain and market share.

Just how aware was Sweet Life that its IT systems were at risk? Did Anne Margate, the chief risk officer, fully understand the potential exposure? Had she and the chief information officer had any discussions about business risk impact if the systems were compromised? Today’s risk manager has to think well beyond insurance procurement. In this new digital era, the CIO becomes a new and important ally in managing risk.

Potential questions to ask:

  • To what extent are your business operations tied to computers, and how reliant are you on these systems to keep your operations running? Do you have a back up plan?
  • How secure is your network? How resilient are your email spam filters and malware protection devices?
  • Have employees received proper network security training?
  • Are measures in place to keep potential intruders from gaining access to your network—internally and externally?

Some pre-emptive actions to consider:

  • Determine what information security standard applies to your industry and base your cybersecurity framework on standardized practices.
  • Identify and classify data based on business criticality, as well as sensitivity/confidentiality of data.
  • Identify critical assets and physical/logical network access points at your facility and determine how access is controlled. Prioritize improvement activities.
  • Create and maintain a documented incident response team to respond to cyber events. The plan should be part of a holistic risk management program.
  • Test the plan. Tabletop simulation exercises can test the plan and identify restoration timeframes.

Multiple policies, various coverage: In terms of insurance coverage, cyber losses tend to involve multiple carriers. In this case, Sweet Life had three separate policies for cyber, crime and property. Unfortunately, how these policies would respond in the event of a cyber attack had never been fully vetted. As is the case with any insurance coverage, the time to learn about what is covered is an exercise best conducted before the loss actually occurs. If you have multiple carriers, be sure that you and your broker meet with them in advance to understand how the policies will respond and iron out any discrepancies.




Dan Reynolds is editor-in-chief of Risk & Insurance. He can be reached at [email protected]
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Sponsored Content: XL Catlin

Mind the Gap in Global Logistics

Shippers need more than just a sophisticated system to manage their growing operations.
By: | December 1, 2016 • 6 min read
XLCatlin_SponsoredContent

Manufacturers and shippers are going global.

As inventories grow, shippers need sophisticated systems to manage it all, and many companies choose to outsource significant chunks of their supply chain management to contracted providers. A recent survey by market research firm Transport Intelligence reveals that outsourcing outnumbers nearshoring in the logistics industry by 2:1. In addition, only 16.7 percent of respondents stated they are outsourcing fewer logistics processes today than they were three years ago.

Those providers in turn take more responsibilities through each step of the bailment process, from processing, packaging and labeling to transportation and storage. Spending in the U.S. logistics and transportation industry totaled $1.45 trillion in 2014 and represented 8.3 percent of annual gross domestic product, according to the International Trade Administration.

“Traditionally these outside parties provided one phase of the supply chain process, perhaps transportation, or just warehousing. Today many of these companies are extending their services and product offerings to many phases of supply chain management,” said Mike Perrotti, Senior Vice President, Inland Marine, XL Catlin.

Such companies are known as third-party logistics (3PL) providers, or even fourth-party logistics (4PL) providers. They could provide transportation, storage, pick-n-pack, processing or consolidation/deconsolidation.

As the provider’s logistics responsibilities widen, their insurance needs grow.

“In the past, the underwriters would piecemeal together different coverages for these logistics providers. For instance, they might take a motor truck cargo policy, and attach a warehouse form, a bailee’s form, other inland marine products, and an ocean cargo form. You would have most of the exposures covered, but when you start taking different products and bolting them together, you end up with gaps,” said Alexander McGinley, Vice President, US Marine, XL Catlin.

A comprehensive logistics form can close those gaps, and demand for such a product has been on the rise over the past decade as logistics providers search for a better way to manage their range of exposures.

XLCatlin_SponsoredContent_Perotti“Traditionally these outside parties provided one phase of the supply chain process, perhaps transportation, or just warehousing. Today many of these companies are extending their services and product offerings to many phases of supply chain management.”
–Mike Perrotti, Senior Vice President, Inland Marine, XL Catlin

A Complementary Package

XL Catlin’s Logistics Services Coverage Solutions takes a holistic approach to the legal liability that 3PL providers face while a manufacturer’s stock is in their care, custody and control.

“A 3PL’s legal liability for loss or damage from a covered cause of loss to the covered property during storage, packaging, consolidation, shipping and related services would be insured under this comprehensive policy,” McGinley said. “It provides piece of mind to both the owner of the goods and the logistics provider that they are protected if something goes wrong.”

In addition to coverage for physical damage, the logistics solution also provides protection from cyber risks, employee theft and contract penalties, and from emerging exposures created by the FDA Food Modernization Act.

This coverage form, however, only protects 3PL companies’ operations within the U.S., its territories and possessions, and Canada. Many large shippers also have an international arm that needs the same protection.

XL Catlin’s Ocean Cargo Coverage Solutions product rounds out the logistics solution with international coverage.

While Ocean Cargo coverage typically serves the owner of a shipment or their customers, it can also be provided to the internationally exposed logistics provider to cover the cargo of others while in their care, custody, and control.

“This covers a client’s shipment that they’re buying from or selling to another party while it’s in transit, by any type of conveyance, anywhere in the world,” said Andrew D’Alessio, National Ocean Cargo Product Leader, XL Catlin. “When provided to the logistics company, they in turn insure the shipment on behalf of the owner of the cargo.”

The international component provided by ocean cargo coverage can also eliminate clients’ fears over non-compliance if admitted insurance coverage is purchased. Through its global network, XL Catlin is uniquely positioned as a multi-national insurer to offer locally admitted coverages in over 200 countries.

XLCatlin_SponsoredContent_McGinley“In the past, the underwriters would piecemeal together different coverages for these logistics providers. For instance, they might take a motor truck cargo policy, and attach a warehouse form, a bailee’s form, other inland marine products, and an ocean cargo form. You would have most of the exposures covered, but when you start taking different products and bolting them together, you end up with gaps.”
–Alexander McGinley, Vice President, US Marine, XL Catlin

A Developing Need

The approaching holiday season demonstrates the need for an insurance product that manages both domestic and international logistics exposures.

In the final months of the year, lots of goods will be shipped to the U.S. from major manufacturing nations in Asia. Transportation providers responsible for importing these goods may require two policies: ocean cargo coverage to address risks to shipments outside North America, and a logistics solution to cover risks once goods arrive in the United States or Canada.

“These transportation providers are expanding globally while also shipping throughout the U.S. That’s how the need for both domestic and international logistics coverage evolved. Until now there have been few solutions to holistically manage their exposures,” D’Alessio said.

In another example, D’Alessio described one major paper provider that expanded its business from manufacturing to include logistics management. In this case, the paper company needed coverage as a primary owner of a product and as the bailee managing the goods their clients own in transit.

“That manufacturer has a significant market share of the world’s paper, producing everything from copy paper to Bible paper, wrapping paper, magazine paper, anything you can think of. Because they were so dominant, their customers started asking them to arrange freight for their products as well,” he said.

XLCatlin_SponsoredContent_Dalessio“These transportation providers are expanding globally while also shipping throughout the U.S. That’s how the need for both domestic and international logistics coverage evolved. Until now there have been few solutions to holistically manage their exposures.”

–Andrew D’Alessio, National Ocean Cargo Product Leader, XL Catlin

The global, multi-national paper company essentially launched a second business, serving as a transportation and logistics provider for their own customers. As the paper shipments changed ownership through the bailment process, the company required two totally different types of insurance coverage: an ocean cargo policy to cover their interests as the owner and producer of the product, and logistics coverage to address their exposures as a transportation provider while they move the products of others.

“As a bailee, they no longer own the products, but they have the care, custody, and control for another party. They need to make sure that they have the appropriate insurance coverage to address those specific risks,” McGinley said.

Unique Offering

“From a coverage standpoint, this is slowly but surely becoming the new standard.  A logistics form on the inland marine side, combined with an international component, is becoming something that a sophisticated client as well as a sophisticated broker should really be asking for,” McGinley said.

The old status quo method of bolting on coverage forms or additional coverages as needed won’t suffice as global shipping needs become more complex.

With one underwriting solution, the marine team at XL Catlin can insure 3PL clients’ risks from both a domestic and international standpoint.

“The two products, Ocean Cargo Coverage Solutions and Logistics Service Coverage Solutions, can be provided to the same customer to really round out all of their bailment, shipping, transportation, and storage needs domestically and around the globe,” D’Alessio said.

Learn more about XL Catlin’s Logistics Services Coverage Solutions and Ocean Cargo Coverage.

The information contained herein is intended for informational purposes only. Insurance coverage in any particular case will depend upon the type of policy in effect, the terms, conditions and exclusions in any such policy, and the facts of each unique situation. No representation is made that any specific insurance coverage would apply in the circumstances outlined herein. Please refer to the individual policy forms for specific coverage details. XL Catlin, the XL Catlin logo and Make Your World Go are trademarks of XL Group Ltd companies. XL Catlin is the global brand used by XL Group Ltd’s (re)insurance subsidiaries. In the US, the insurance companies of XL Group Ltd are: Catlin Indemnity Company, Catlin Insurance Company, Inc., Catlin Specialty Insurance Company, Greenwich Insurance Company, Indian Harbor Insurance Company, XL Insurance America, Inc., and XL Specialty Insurance Company. Not all of the insurers do business in all jurisdictions nor is coverage available in all jurisdictions. Information accurate as of December 2016.

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This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with XL Catlin. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.




XL Catlin. From insurance to reinsurance, a changing world needs new answers. We’re here to find them. With an incredible blend of people, products, services and technology, we have the power to find innovative, creative solutions to your risks — from the most familiar to the most complex.
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