Reducing Cat Risks

Wind Turbines Slow Down Hurricane Winds

Hurricane winds are dissipated by offshore wind farms.
By: | March 6, 2014 • 3 min read
Topics: Catastrophe | Energy
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Off the New York coastline would be a perfect place for an array of wind turbines, according to a Stanford professor. It would not only offer clean energy to the Big Apple but it would protect it the next time a Superstorm Sandy comes calling.

“If you have a large enough array of wind turbines, you can prevent the wind speeds [of a hurricane] from ever getting up to the destructive wind speeds,” said Mark Jacobson, a professor of civil and environmental engineering at Stanford University.

Computer models demonstrated that offshore wind turbines reduce peak wind speeds in hurricanes by up to 92 mph and decrease storm surge by up to 79 percent, said Jacobson, who worked on the study with University of Delaware researchers Cristina Archer and Willett Kempton.

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“The additional benefits are there is zero cost unlike seawalls, which would cost about $30 billion,” he said, noting that the wind turbines “generate electricity so they pay for themselves.”

The researchers studied three hurricanes, Sandy and Isaac, which struck New York and New Orleans, respectively, in 2012; and Katrina, which slammed into New Orleans in 2005. Generally, 70 percent of damage is caused by storm surge, with wind causing the remaining 30 percent, he said.

That’s why onshore wind farms would not be as effective, he said. While they would reduce the wind speed, they wouldn’t impact storm surge.

In 2013, one of the “most inactive” Atlantic hurricane seasons on record, insured losses totaled $920 million, according to Guy Carpenter, which relied on information from the Mexican Association of Insurance Institutions. The most noteworthy events were Hurricane Ingrid in the Atlantic and Tropical Storm Manuel in the Pacific, which displaced thousands as they caused excessive rainfall, flooding and mudslides.

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According to the Insurance Information Institute, Katrina was the costliest hurricane in insurance history, at $48.7 billion, followed by Andrew in 1992 at $25.6 billion and Sandy at $18.8 billion. Economic losses, of course, were much higher.

Wind turbines, which can withstand speeds of up to 112 mph, dissipate the hurricane winds from the outside-in, according to Jacobson’s study. First, they slow down the outer rotation winds, which feeds back to decrease wave height. That reduces the movement of air toward the center of the hurricane, and increases the central pressure, which in turn slows the winds of the entire hurricane and dissipates it faster.

The benefit would occur whether the turbines were immediately upstream of a city, or along an expanse of coastline. It could take anywhere from tens of thousands to hundreds of thousands of wind turbines off the coast to offer sufficient hurricane protection.

At present, there are no wind farms off the U.S. coastline, although 18 have been proposed for off the East Coast. Proposals have also been made for off the West Coast and the Great Lakes. There are 25 operational wind farms off the coast of Europe.

“Overall,” Jacobson and his colleagues concluded in the study, “we find here that large arrays of electricity-generating offshore wind turbines may diminish hurricane risk cost-effectively while reducing air pollution and global warming, and providing local or regionally sourced energy supply.”

Anne Freedman is managing editor of Risk & Insurance. She can be reached at [email protected]
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Risk Management

The Profession

David Hornaday knows risk managers have to be more fluent and competent in the financial world. Just procuring insurance isn’t enough anymore.
By: | August 3, 2016 • 4 min read

R&I: What was your first job?

Working as a signalman for Consolidated Rail Corp. I did that for about a year and a half before I got my first risk management job as a claims agent for ConRail. That was a self-insured company, so they administered their own claims.

R&I: How did you come to work in risk management? 

082016_ProfessionConRail got acquired by two different railroads and was split up, so I had the opportunity to either go with one of the railroads or look outside for another position, and I wanted to do more than just work with claims. I wanted to be exposed to the corporate risk management side of things. So I found a job as a risk manager for Suburban Propane in Whippany, N.J.

R&I: What is the risk management community doing right?

We’re working closely with brokers and underwriters and communicating internally to bring the insurance expertise to companies that need it.

R&I: What could the risk management community be doing a better job of?

Risk managers should be aware of non-traditional risks and focusing on ERM, versus just the traditional insurance procurement function. That’s where the future of our profession is going.

R&I:: What was the best location and year for the RIMS conference and why?

This is a little self-serving, but I thought Vancouver in 2011 was great because I had never been there but always wanted to go.

R&I: What’s been the biggest change in the risk management and insurance industry since you’ve been in it?

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Risk managers have to be more fluent and competent in the financial world. Just procuring insurance isn’t enough anymore. You have to have a basic level of financial knowledge to communicate with not only internal treasury and CFOs, but also with underwriters and insurers.

R&I: What emerging commercial risk most concerns you?

Social engineering. The onslaught of fraudsters is relentless. Companies have to be vigilant. But the coverage surrounding that sort of risk is also emerging, so risk managers will have to pay close attention to that and keep up with that evolving coverage.

R&I: What insurance carrier do you have the highest opinion of?

We had a major loss recently and there was a handful of insurers who paid on that claim which I thought were exceedingly professional: ACE (now Chubb), Ironshore and XL (now XL Catlin).

R&I: How much business do you do direct versus going through a broker?

We use a broker for everything.

R&I: Is the contingent commission controversy overblown?

It probably was a little bit overblown, but I think it’s good that things are more transparent now.

R&I: Are you optimistic about the U.S. economy or pessimistic and why?

I’m probably a little more pessimistic than optimistic. I just don’t see signs of strength out there. There are still companies with tons of cash outside the U.S. which can’t really bring it back in a way that makes sense. U.S. oil production is way down since the price of oil is so low.  Of course, the lower gas prices help the average consumer and lowers overhead costs for businesses, so it’s a little bit of a mixed bag.

R&I: Who is your mentor and why?

My mentor in this business is Joe Racansky. He was the director of risk management and my boss at CyTec Industries, and I learned as much from him as anybody in my career.

R&I: What have you accomplished that you are proudest of?

Successfully resolving claims stemming from the Lac-Megantic train derailment in 2013.

R&I: How many e-mails do you get in a day?

I’d say about 100.

R&I: How many do you answer?

All the important ones.

R&I:: What’s the best restaurant you’ve ever eaten at?

Prime 112 in South Beach, Miami. It was the freshest tuna I’ve ever had, and it was with the team from Aon, so it was great food and great company.

R&I: What is your favorite drink?

Gin and tonic.

R&I: What is your favorite book or movie?

My favorite movie is “Bull Durham.” It’s a baseball movie.

R&I: Who’s your favorite baseball team?

The Cincinnati Reds.

R&I: What is the most unusual/interesting place you have ever visited?

Key West, Fla., is pretty interesting. My wife and I have been there a few times and you always see something different.

R&I: If the world has a modern hero, who is it and why?

I was moved by the Chris Kyle story. I thought his life and story were inspiring.

R&I: What do your friends and family think you do?

I think they think I just buy insurance, when it’s really more comprehensive than that. They don’t know about meeting with underwriters and contract review and working on M&A deals.




Katie Siegel is a staff writer at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]
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Sponsored: Starr Companies

To Keep Cool in a Crisis, Companies Need a Comprehensive Solution

Corporate security threats now come in many forms, and mid-size companies should be prepared to cover them all.
By: | August 4, 2016 • 6 min read
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Threats against corporate security come in many forms, from intentional acts of violence to civil unrest to cyber-attacks. The perpetrators don’t discriminate by company size or sector, and the consequences can range from several thousand dollars lost to several lives lost.

The recent shooting in an Orlando nightclub that killed 49, for example, or last year’s San Bernardino shooting that killed 14, are somber reminders that terrorism and violence can erupt anywhere and in any type of business. In addition to loss of life, violence can translate into business interruption and property damage. In Ferguson, Mo., riots lead to over $4 million in property damage.

Cyber-attacks have also become commonplace, with hackers infiltrating private networks to steal data or hold it ransom.

Is your organization prepared for these risks?

“A lot of companies have a crisis response plan on paper, but they don’t have outside resources to come to their aid if there is an incident,” said Reggie Gibbs, Underwriter and Product Manager, Starr Companies.

Mid-size companies especially tend to lack comprehensive insurance coverage and crisis management services for a variety of security events due either to limited resources or an underestimation of their exposure.

Starr Companies’ Cyber and Terror Response (CTR) solution provides three coverages as well as crisis response services tailored to meet the needs of these companies. Each of its components addresses a common security threat.

SponsoredContent_Starr_0816“We don’t just want to indemnify the security risks our clients face; we want to help them actively manage them.”
 
— Reggie Gibbs, Underwriter & Product Manager, Starr Companies

Terror and Political Violence

“Political violence can be defined as a strike, riot, protest, or any type of unrest that gets out of hand and turns violent,” said Gibbs, who specializes in terrorism and political violence, workplace violence, and crisis management.

In the case of the Ferguson protests, any first party property damage or third party liability incurred by the disruption would be covered under the terrorism and political violence segment of the CTR solution.

In the case of a terror attack, organizations cannot necessarily rely on TRIA to pick up property losses. In the case of the Orlando shooting, for example, the likelihood of TRIA being invoked is low because property damage will not meet the threshold for coverage to kick in.

TRIA, reauthorized in 2015, provides a federal insurance backstop in the event of a terror attack. The U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, U.S. Attorney General, and U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security must declare an attack to be an act of terrorism, and property damage must exceed $5 million to trigger TRIA.

“We would still view the Orlando shooting as an act of terror, however, because of who the shooter claimed he was working for regardless if the ties to terror groups are clear or not. Therefore, our coverage would apply,” Gibbs said. Even if TRIA was enacted, however, companies would still have a lot of pieces to pick up following an attack. They may have injured or deceased employees, or face legal action from third parties.

Workplace Violence

For these situations, and any other incident of violence not driven by terrorism, the workplace violence component of Starr’s CTR solution would act as an umbrella to cover other liabilities such as legal liability, loss of life benefits, psychiatric care, and other crisis response services.

One such incident struck a Boston-area Bertucci’s in early May. An attacker wielding a knife drove his car into a Boston shopping mall before making his way into the nearby restaurant. He killed five, including restaurant workers and patrons.

“There was no ideological or political motivation behind it. He was just deranged.” Gibbs said. “Our workplace violence coverage can handle the loss of life benefits for both the employees and patrons killed in situations like this one.”

In the best cases, though, violence can be prevented altogether.

“If an employee reports a stalking threat, the policy would cover the expense of security guards,” Gibbs said. “In this case, it’s more of a pre-workplace violence coverage. It would de-escalate the situation.”

Cyber Liability

SponsoredContent_Starr_0816Attacks can also be non-physical.

Cyber extortion in particular is on the rise. Phishing scams lead employees to click on malicious links, unknowingly downloading ransomware onto their internal networks. The cyber criminals then hold companies’ networks ransom, asking for a sum of money in return for the release of data or to prevent a business interruption. The ransoms can be low — amounts that organizations can afford to pay.

“The hackers don’t want to attract the attention of law enforcement or regulatory agencies,” said Annamaria Landaverde, National Cyber Practice Leader & Professional Liability Underwriting Manager, Starr Companies. Landaverde specializes in the cyber component of the CTR coverage. “The FBI may not get involved if someone asks for $5,000. They are more likely to get involved if someone asks for $5 million.”

Since companies are not required by law to report cyber extortion —like they are for data breaches — many choose simply to pay the ransom and move on without generating any negative news headlines.

Starr_SponsoredContent“The hackers don’t want to attract the attention of any law enforcement or regulatory agencies. The F.B.I. won’t get involved if someone asks for $5,000. They will get involved if someone asks for $5 million.”

— Annamaria Landaverde, National Cyber Practice Leader & Underwriting Manager, Professional Liability Division, Starr Companies

“A California medical center recently had an incident like this where the hackers asked for $17,000 in ransom,” Landaverde said,” but the amounts can vary.”

While the ransom itself may seem manageable, many companies fail to recognize other costs associated with the identification and removal of the malware from their system. There may also be costs associated with forensics investigations, legal experts, public relations firms, third party lawsuits, and notification and credit monitoring.

“The cyber arm of the CTR coverage extends to liability that an organization would suffer as a result of a breach, or failure of security of the insured’s network,” Landaverde said. That includes not just cyber extortion, but outright data theft or denial-of-service attacks.

Crisis Management Services

SponsoredContent_Starr_0816“We don’t just want to indemnify the security risks our clients face; we want to help them actively manage them,” Gibbs said.

The fourth component of Starr’s CTR solution – crisis response — provides two outside consultants to insureds, with one specializing in “hard” security services like guards or instances of cyber extortion, and another focusing on crisis communications.

Without these outside services, there is only so much insurance can do in the aftermath of a crisis. Experienced consultants provide a range of security preparedness and response services to complement coverage and help insureds recover from an episode of violence or cyber event.

“From a communications perspective, our consultants can manage the public relations front to create clear and consistent messaging, but they can also stay in touch with families after a terror or other violent attack to make sure everyone stays informed,” Gibbs said.

They also serve as a first point of contact for insureds immediately after an event. If they need guidance quickly, consultants await at the ready.

“When a client purchases the product, they get a 24-hour hotline set up with one of our consultancies,” he said. “They can report an incident at any time, and our consultant will help either resolve a situation or deal with the aftermath in whatever way they can.”

While the Cyber and Terror Response package provides a comprehensive solution tailored for mid-size companies, Starr also offers standalone cyber liability and crisis management coverage on a primary and excess basis.

“For companies with greater exposure to a particular type of risk, or who simply want higher limits or greater customization, we have those standalone polices.” Landaverde said.

For more information on Starr Companies’ Cyber and Terror Response solution, visit https://www.starrcompanies.com/Insurance/CyberAndTerrorResponse.

Starr Companies is the worldwide marketing name for the operating insurance and travel assistance companies and subsidiaries of Starr International Company, Inc. and for the investment business of C. V. Starr & Co., Inc. and its subsidiaries.
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This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with Starr Companies. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.




Starr Companies is a global commercial insurance and financial services organization that provides innovative risk management solutions.
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